1
vote
3answers
75 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

“These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research” [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the ...
1
vote
1answer
142 views

“Help in doing something” or “Help doing something”

Is the preposition in necessary or abundant? To be specific, which of these two sentences sounds better/is correct? This helps in achieving better fuel economy. or This helps achieving ...
-2
votes
2answers
82 views

Is it grammatically sound to group nouns/verbs sharing a preposition that governs the same object using an “and” multiple times in one sentence?

For example, does the below sentence violate any grammar rules? "Global Connections" will be showcasing internship opportunities, job openings and training programs at, challenges and issues facing, ...
-1
votes
1answer
71 views

Verb + Preposition - use of from

I have a cylinder and a nail. If an instruction says 'the nail is inserted from the top' what is the correct meaning? Does the verb refer to the cylinder or the nail?
0
votes
1answer
38 views

“Facility for speaking” vs. “facility to speak”

Which one would you use: I lost my facility to speak. I lost my facility for speaking. Or does either work?
1
vote
2answers
375 views

“click on the image” vs. “click the image” [duplicate]

Transitive verbs take object directly. Source - http://grammar.about.com/od/tz/g/tranverb02term.htm If "click" is a transitive verb, why do we say "click on the image" and not "click the image"?
0
votes
1answer
84 views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same TWO objects?

How could one combine succinctly two verbs with the same two objects with different prepositions? For example, if I can either add gifts to a box and remove gifts from the box, what would be the most ...
0
votes
1answer
195 views

preposition 'to' after verb 'talk' [closed]

I'm confused whether it is correct to use 'to' after 'talk' or not? Some examples would really be appreciated.
2
votes
3answers
504 views

“Excel at something” vs. “excel in something”

I've come across a question while writing an exam Roger really excelled ___ sports A) at B) on C) in D) for My first thought was 'in', later I remembered using 'at' also. I've ...
0
votes
1answer
185 views

Usage of “but” as preposition

About usage of "but", I am confused with this sentence: You have no choice but to perform the back-test yourself. "But" is the preposition in this sentence. Why is the use of infinitive? Can I ...
0
votes
3answers
88 views

“Seek the truth in X” vs. “seek the truth with X”

Ran into the phrase to seek the truth in love meaning "seek truth without hurting others in the process". I feel it should be "with" rather than "in." No rule in this case?
2
votes
3answers
278 views

Direct and Indirect Objects with the verbs: Give, Buy, and Bring

Both these phrases are correct, Give me it Buy me them so why are these sentences wrong? Give John it Buy John them In these sentences, "me/John" are both indirect ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

The meaning of 'be of' [closed]

What about such a statement that I found in one of the books for ESL learners: 'what is it of?' or 'what are they of?' What's the meaning of 'be of' here?
1
vote
4answers
145 views

Preposition for “to be qualified”

Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct? ...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among... I know that ...
0
votes
2answers
76 views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
0
votes
3answers
236 views

“provide” vs. “provide with”

I am wondering if the following sentence is correct: We add the information their study provides with to our article. The context is: their study provides with some information. And we add the ...
0
votes
6answers
421 views

What does “gut over” mean?

What does "gutted over" mean in Javad Zarif's recent tweet? Mr.Secretary, was it Iran that gutted over half of US draft Thursday night? and publicly commented against it Friday morning?
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Is this “debate” a noun or a verb?

Monday's vote opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.
1
vote
1answer
417 views

“Enquire about whether” vs. “enquire whether”

I'm writing to you to enquire whether you have a need for I'm writing to you to enquire about whether you have a need for Which is proper?
0
votes
3answers
143 views

“Verify with me” vs. “verify for me”

Which would be more appropriate when asking for address verification: Can you verify with me you mailing address? Can you verify for me your mailing address? Though I believe this ...
4
votes
3answers
459 views

What preposition is used with “sit” and “computer”?

I personally would say "to sit at the computer", but a friend of mine said he heard "to sit on the computer" from a native speaker. That does not sound right to me at all, and I trust my guts, but ...
11
votes
4answers
541 views

Using “apologize” without “for”

Is it grammatically correct to use "apologize" as a verb without the preposition "for"? apologize: to make a formal defense in speech or writing. "I apologize the event." Wouldn't this ...
0
votes
1answer
204 views

What is the appropriate verb and preposition to say “play the lottery”?

Do we play the lottery? Do we play in/on the lottery? Do we bet the lottery? What is the appropriate verb for the sentence and is it necessary to use a preposition?
1
vote
4answers
311 views

Using the prepositions “on”/“off” as transitive verbs

Is it correct to say 'on it' or 'off it', where 'it' may refer to something like a light switch?
1
vote
1answer
98 views

“Come of a royal family” vs. “comes from a royal family”

Is it correct to say "She comes of a royal family"? Or should it be "She comes from a royal family"? Both sound correct to me. Could someone explain?
1
vote
1answer
599 views

Use of verb to give is used alone or with preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Why is it that when I say "I will give this book to my daughter", I am using the verb "give" and the preposition "to", but "to" is not used in the following: "What kind of names do people in your ...
2
votes
1answer
254 views

How to use “to offer” with two objects?

I am new in this web site! I would like to know if the following sentence is correct : Operating systems offer processes running in user mode a set of interfaces that can be used to make ...
0
votes
3answers
78 views

Crusade of vs. Crusades for - which is correct?

Crusade of or crusade for Crusades of or crusades for Which expression is correct? Also, do any express the party the crusade against? For example, is "crusade for peace against dictators" ...
4
votes
2answers
314 views

When using multiple verbs that typically use different prepositions, which do I choose? [duplicate]

This is the sentence I wrote: It is as simple as adding or removing an item to/from the list. Now I'm wondering if I should use "to" or "from" or "to/from" in: Written English, Spoken ...
0
votes
3answers
200 views

What is the suitable preposition which come after the verb “hassle”?

Should we say, A hassles with B or A hassles to B? What is the right expression?
1
vote
1answer
190 views

“Function defined on/over the set A”

For the mathematically inclined fellows: If f is a function whose domain is the set A, do you say that f is defined on A or over A? Do both prepositions apply here or is the use of one of them ...
0
votes
1answer
287 views

What to do with a list of verbs with different prepositional needs?

For example: The community was not supportive of, or happy with the result. The community was not supportive or happy with the result. So when using two sets of verbs and prepositions (listing) in a ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
2
votes
1answer
295 views

Use of gerund without preposition “to”

Can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below? He concedes killing his wife.
0
votes
1answer
292 views

“Ride a bicycle” or “ride on bicycle”?

Which is correct, "ride on a bicycle" or "ride a bicycle"?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“Take the role” vs. “take over the role” vs. “take on the role”

Is there a significant difference between the three expressions, or can they be used interchangeably? I'm trying to say that a colleague of mine succeeded to another after the latter had quit his ...
-1
votes
2answers
647 views

Is “off to somewhere with a car” correct?

I wonder if the structure of the following sentence is correct: I'm off to my place with my car. I'm the one driving the car, but I prefer not to use the verb drive. Would the following ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Install on, install in, install to

When I say "programs to install on a new PC" it sounds alright to me, but I'm not sure if it's the correct usage. Which one of the following should I use? Programs to install on a new PC Programs to ...
0
votes
2answers
88 views

“leverage 'x' with 'y'”?

I read through other questions regarding the use of "leverage" and wonder if you can "leverage one resource with another? For example "Leverage our resources with your own to help you gain market ...
0
votes
1answer
285 views

“To try oneself in something” template usage

For example, I'd like to try myself in farming. Is this grammatically correct? I want to express that I never have done farming before and wish to begin doing it.
0
votes
2answers
101 views

Does “unfold with something” mean “unfold like something”?

Here's a sentence I don't completely understand. The story leaps back and forth in time with crisp juxtaposing of scenes set in disparate places. The production nevertheless unfolds with the ...
0
votes
1answer
290 views

deputizing and covering…“for” or not

Which of the following is grammatical? I am deputizing for him/her. I am deputizing him/her. I think in the case of covering you have to use: I am covering for him/her. ...or do ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

When to use “include” and “including”?

I know that include is a verb while including is a preposition but they made me confuse when it comes to their usage. I usually confuse when to use include with including. Most Thais like ...
4
votes
2answers
430 views

“Consists of” vs. “consists in”: different meanings of the verb, or the same meaning applied differently?

Mark Twain said, Good breeding consists in concealing how much we think of ourselves and how little we think of the other person. Could he have used consists of there instead of consists in and ...
9
votes
4answers
592 views

login and payoff are nouns. But can they be used as verbs?

I know that words like login and payoff are properly nouns but I increasingly notice many (not at all uneducated) people use them as verbs: Will you payoff your credit card this month? and ...
3
votes
3answers
716 views

“At” vs. “in” before verb

In a document I found the following sentence: listeners are more accurate at understanding speech spoken in their own accent... Would it be an error to use "in" instead of "at"? Actually in ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“Translated in” vs. “translated to”

Both of these seem very similar to me. Is there any difference between "books translated to English" and "books translated in English"? Google search returns many results for both (> 400,000), though ...
0
votes
5answers
76 views

Is using “get on developing” correct in this phrase?

You could get on developing this project and help me to add more features to that.
0
votes
5answers
139 views

Meaning of “running off” in this context [closed]

I do not understand the use of "run off" in the following sentence. Neither was I able to find any explanation so I guess it is not a phrase? If your generator (software) was running off a ...