2
votes
5answers
98 views

“Share me” or “Share with me”?

I heard people saying: Can you please share me the slides? or Can you share me the note, etc.? I think it should be: Can you please share the slides with me? or Can you share ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

Does one include a comma after the last proposition in a list of multiple preposition-verb pairs

Should I do this: The developers are less experienced in, or passionate about, UX. Or should I remove the last comma: The developers are less experienced in, or passionate about UX. This ...
0
votes
3answers
75 views

What does “match X against Y” mean?

I just read a post that says: When Angular bootstraps your application, the HTML compiler traverses the DOM matching directives against the DOM elements. What does "match... against" mean? How ...
0
votes
2answers
224 views

Is it “restricted to” or “restricted from”? [closed]

I came across this sentence: The power to rule was restricted to ministers, and it was restricted from king. What is the difference between "restricted to" and "restricted from" here?
1
vote
1answer
39 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
3
votes
1answer
178 views

conceived of as vs. conceived as

When I want to write that some something has been "taken to mean" or "understood" or "interpreted as" XYZ, I sometimes use the phrase "to conceive of something as XYZ, where XYZ usually is a longer ...
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Is there any difference between “invite to” and “invite for”?

Is there any difference between invite to and invite for in terms of usage and meaning? For example: invite someone to lunch, dinner, a party, or a meeting but invite them for a drink or a meal
-1
votes
1answer
249 views

using a preposition after verbs such as “enter” and “control”

consider the two sentence below: "Elizabeth Taylor entered the room" and "she entered into the room". here is another pair: "the rebels control the city" and "they control over the city". my ...
-1
votes
2answers
53 views

Verbs within a prepostional phrase

In the following two sentences I see verbs being used within prepositional phrases. Is this acceptable in casual conversation? The meanings in both cases are clear. It depends on what the meaning ...
1
vote
3answers
159 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

“These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research” [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Help in doing something” or “Help doing something”

Is the preposition in necessary or abundant? To be specific, which of these two sentences sounds better/is correct? This helps in achieving better fuel economy. or This helps achieving ...
-2
votes
2answers
215 views

Is it grammatically sound to group nouns/verbs sharing a preposition that governs the same object using an “and” multiple times in one sentence?

For example, does the below sentence violate any grammar rules? "Global Connections" will be showcasing internship opportunities, job openings and training programs at, challenges and issues facing, ...
-1
votes
1answer
109 views

Verb + Preposition - use of from

I have a cylinder and a nail. If an instruction says 'the nail is inserted from the top' what is the correct meaning? Does the verb refer to the cylinder or the nail?
0
votes
1answer
61 views

“Facility for speaking” vs. “facility to speak”

Which one would you use: I lost my facility to speak. I lost my facility for speaking. Or does either work?
1
vote
2answers
674 views

“click on the image” vs. “click the image” [duplicate]

Transitive verbs take object directly. Source - http://grammar.about.com/od/tz/g/tranverb02term.htm If "click" is a transitive verb, why do we say "click on the image" and not "click the image"?
0
votes
1answer
135 views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same TWO objects?

How could one combine succinctly two verbs with the same two objects with different prepositions? For example, if I can either add gifts to a box and remove gifts from the box, what would be the most ...
-1
votes
1answer
547 views

preposition 'to' after verb 'talk' [closed]

I'm confused whether it is correct to use 'to' after 'talk' or not? Some examples would really be appreciated.
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“Excel at something” vs. “excel in something”

I've come across a question while writing an exam Roger really excelled ___ sports A) at B) on C) in D) for My first thought was 'in', later I remembered using 'at' also. I've ...
0
votes
1answer
280 views

Usage of “but” as preposition

About usage of "but", I am confused with this sentence: You have no choice but to perform the back-test yourself. "But" is the preposition in this sentence. Why is the use of infinitive? Can I ...
0
votes
3answers
93 views

“Seek the truth in X” vs. “seek the truth with X”

Ran into the phrase to seek the truth in love meaning "seek truth without hurting others in the process". I feel it should be "with" rather than "in." No rule in this case?
2
votes
3answers
670 views

Direct and Indirect Objects with the verbs: Give, Buy, and Bring

Both these phrases are correct, Give me it Buy me them so why are these sentences wrong? Give John it Buy John them In these sentences, "me/John" are both indirect ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

The meaning of 'be of' [closed]

What about such a statement that I found in one of the books for ESL learners: 'what is it of?' or 'what are they of?' What's the meaning of 'be of' here?
1
vote
4answers
283 views

Preposition for “to be qualified”

Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct? ...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among... I know that ...
0
votes
3answers
166 views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

“provide” vs. “provide with”

I am wondering if the following sentence is correct: We add the information their study provides with to our article. The context is: their study provides with some information. And we add the ...
0
votes
6answers
464 views

What does “gut over” mean?

What does "gutted over" mean in Javad Zarif's recent tweet? Mr.Secretary, was it Iran that gutted over half of US draft Thursday night? and publicly commented against it Friday morning?
1
vote
1answer
93 views

Is this “debate” a noun or a verb?

Monday's vote opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Enquire about whether” vs. “enquire whether”

I'm writing to you to enquire whether you have a need for I'm writing to you to enquire about whether you have a need for Which is proper?
0
votes
3answers
284 views

“Verify with me” vs. “verify for me”

Which would be more appropriate when asking for address verification: Can you verify with me you mailing address? Can you verify for me your mailing address? Though I believe this ...
4
votes
3answers
777 views

What preposition is used with “sit” and “computer”?

I personally would say "to sit at the computer", but a friend of mine said he heard "to sit on the computer" from a native speaker. That does not sound right to me at all, and I trust my guts, but ...
11
votes
4answers
702 views

Using “apologize” without “for”

Is it grammatically correct to use "apologize" as a verb without the preposition "for"? apologize: to make a formal defense in speech or writing. "I apologize the event." Wouldn't this ...
0
votes
1answer
272 views

What is the appropriate verb and preposition to say “play the lottery”?

Do we play the lottery? Do we play in/on the lottery? Do we bet the lottery? What is the appropriate verb for the sentence and is it necessary to use a preposition?
1
vote
4answers
413 views

Using the prepositions “on”/“off” as transitive verbs

Is it correct to say 'on it' or 'off it', where 'it' may refer to something like a light switch?
1
vote
1answer
104 views

“Come of a royal family” vs. “comes from a royal family”

Is it correct to say "She comes of a royal family"? Or should it be "She comes from a royal family"? Both sound correct to me. Could someone explain?
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Use of verb to give is used alone or with preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Why is it that when I say "I will give this book to my daughter", I am using the verb "give" and the preposition "to", but "to" is not used in the following: "What kind of names do people in your ...
2
votes
1answer
397 views

How to use “to offer” with two objects?

I am new in this web site! I would like to know if the following sentence is correct : Operating systems offer processes running in user mode a set of interfaces that can be used to make ...
0
votes
3answers
84 views

Crusade of vs. Crusades for - which is correct?

Crusade of or crusade for Crusades of or crusades for Which expression is correct? Also, do any express the party the crusade against? For example, is "crusade for peace against dictators" ...
4
votes
2answers
360 views

When using multiple verbs that typically use different prepositions, which do I choose? [duplicate]

This is the sentence I wrote: It is as simple as adding or removing an item to/from the list. Now I'm wondering if I should use "to" or "from" or "to/from" in: Written English, Spoken ...
0
votes
3answers
254 views

What is the suitable preposition which come after the verb “hassle”?

Should we say, A hassles with B or A hassles to B? What is the right expression?
1
vote
1answer
293 views

“Function defined on/over the set A”

For the mathematically inclined fellows: If f is a function whose domain is the set A, do you say that f is defined on A or over A? Do both prepositions apply here or is the use of one of them ...
0
votes
1answer
385 views

What to do with a list of verbs with different prepositional needs?

For example: The community was not supportive of, or happy with the result. The community was not supportive or happy with the result. So when using two sets of verbs and prepositions (listing) in a ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
2
votes
1answer
324 views

Use of gerund without preposition “to”

Can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below? He concedes killing his wife.
0
votes
1answer
411 views

“Ride a bicycle” or “ride on bicycle”?

Which is correct, "ride on a bicycle" or "ride a bicycle"?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“Take the role” vs. “take over the role” vs. “take on the role”

Is there a significant difference between the three expressions, or can they be used interchangeably? I'm trying to say that a colleague of mine succeeded to another after the latter had quit his ...
-1
votes
2answers
815 views

Is “off to somewhere with a car” correct?

I wonder if the structure of the following sentence is correct: I'm off to my place with my car. I'm the one driving the car, but I prefer not to use the verb drive. Would the following ...
6
votes
4answers
4k views

Install on, install in, install to

When I say "programs to install on a new PC" it sounds alright to me, but I'm not sure if it's the correct usage. Which one of the following should I use? Programs to install on a new PC Programs to ...
0
votes
2answers
96 views

“leverage 'x' with 'y'”?

I read through other questions regarding the use of "leverage" and wonder if you can "leverage one resource with another? For example "Leverage our resources with your own to help you gain market ...
0
votes
1answer
381 views

“To try oneself in something” template usage

For example, I'd like to try myself in farming. Is this grammatically correct? I want to express that I never have done farming before and wish to begin doing it.