4
votes
4answers
99 views

What Does Strike a Chord Mean?

I am not a native speaker. From my reading and verbal communication, I came to believe that striking a chord means connecting to someone at an emotional level. However, I recently used it somewhere ...
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Does “allows to + verb” imply that the corresponding event occured?

Example: Yahoo vulnerability allows hacker to delete 1.5 million records from database. Does this imply that the hacker did delete those records or just that he was in the position to delete the ...
0
votes
2answers
92 views

Reserve or book tickets?

In an app I am writing the user can book/reserve tickets for riding a bus. Which of the following terms does fit this process best? 'Reserve Tickets' or 'Book Tickets' Also, in some cases the user ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

Is 'subject' in 'is subject to considerable debate' a verb or a noun?

Every once in a while I stumble upon this phrase: ... is subject to considerable debate Examples are easily found on the web, for instance: In the context of suspected cognitive disorders, the ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

we take safety measures, do we also 'take' control measures?

Someone provided me with a PowerPoint presentation and instructed me to convert it into a word document with sentences rather than point form notes. Here is what the PowerPoint slide said: "Control ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

How do you parse the sentence “He had Elizabeth read the letter aloud.”?

The Stanford parser gave the following output. I think the word "read" should be tagged with VBN (past participle). (ROOT (S (NP (PRP He)) (VP (VBD had) (S (NP (NNP ...
1
vote
4answers
319 views

What is the difference between “splitting something” and “dividing something”?

What is the difference between "splitting something" and "dividing something"? When do people say split and when do they say divide?
2
votes
1answer
78 views

Is “grapple hooking” a correct phrase?

I want to say "using a grapple hook" as a verb. In context it would be like "sprinting, jumping, grapple hooking"—but that doesn't sound right. Is it correct? If not, is there a way to say it as a ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

Differences in the Semantics of Three Tri-Part Phrasal Verbs

What are the subtle semantic differences in the following three tri-part phrasal verbs: (1) be up against (2) come up against (3) run up against
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Can 'it' be used plurally?

Can 'it' as a pronoun refer to many different imperative verbs? For instance, in the sentence: Abide by thy customs, thou excellent one: grind thy corn, drink thy water, praise thy cooking,-- if ...
3
votes
1answer
321 views

What is the present participle of “stop, drop, and roll”?

In a verb phrase, such as stop, drop, and roll, how do I conjugate this in the present participle? Stopping, dropping, and rolling? Stop, drop, and rolling?
0
votes
2answers
292 views

What does “to be caught in a controversy” mean?

Can I use something like "I am caught in a controversy" to express that I am witnessing and confused by the controversy between other entities?
1
vote
1answer
6k views

Is it “my passion lies in” or “my passion is”?

I have the following sentence in my résumé: My passion lies in analyzing complex algorithms. Someone pointed out to me that it is not correct, and that it should be: My passion is analyzing ...
5
votes
4answers
423 views

What is the grammar behind “Thanks be to God”?

What is the grammatical interpretation of the phrase? I don't understand what verb tense or voice is used.
5
votes
6answers
639 views

“Do a shop” for “go shopping”

This has puzzled me for a few years now. When preceded by 'a', shop becomes a noun. Does "do a shop" even make sense then? The correct phrase for me was always "go shopping", or similar. Can ...
7
votes
1answer
203 views

When was the word “scroll” first used as a verb?

We all know that a scroll is a roll of parchment used in ancient times. A scroll can be rolled up or down, and that must have been the metaphor the creator of the computer-term "scroll" had in mind. ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

About two mutually related, future actions [closed]

Is it correct to say: "I will do that thing when I will talk to him."?
10
votes
2answers
607 views

“Try to save” or “try saving”

Are both try to save the file and try saving the file grammatically correct? If so, is there any difference in meaning?
4
votes
3answers
4k views

Is “give an exam” grammatical for “writing the answers to exam”?

Amongst North Indian Students, the phrase "give an exam" is very popular. These students use the phrase to describe the act of writing the answers to examination questions. The reason being, in ...
13
votes
9answers
1k views

“Assign a variable to a value” or the other way round?

I was wondering which of these phrases is/are correct: assign a variable to a value assign a value to a variable I'd say the second is correct, but I'm not a native speaker. A quick Google search ...
2
votes
3answers
326 views

How different is “Be rid of somebody” from “Get rid of somebody”? Are they interchangeable?

In the movie review article of Clint Eastwood’s “J. Edgar” in the New Yorker magazine (November 14) titled “the Man in Charge,” there was the following sentence: “A single scene with Robert F. ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

Meaning of “course of the year”

I don't quite get the meaning of course of the year in the following sentence. They search for food by moving over ice from island to island during the course of the year. What does course ...
2
votes
5answers
629 views

“A classmate and I was” vs “A classmate and I were”

I'm writing a resume right now targeted towards a specific company. My girlfriend (a classmate) and I were (see, I don't know if that's the right word, hence this question!) the first from our school ...
1
vote
2answers
84 views

About 'used to'

You used to have muscles. You can use it to me. Sometimes, "used to" means "often", sometimes use+to just means "use". How to diff those two situations?
0
votes
3answers
2k views

“There is” or “there are”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “There are so many” vs. “There is so many” I know this is correct: There's no problem. But what if it was plural, i.e. problems? Would this ...
3
votes
2answers
289 views

Animalisms… What other terms derive from parts of an animal, like 'wing it', or 'hoof it'? [closed]

The question " Past tense of "to wing"? " got me thinking about terms we use in the English language that derive from parts of an animal, especially verbs or verb phrases, like 'wing it' or ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

A machine spits out the product

So what's the opposite of feeding material to a machine? Are products ejected or discharged? While I think this may apply to a fast process where the product gets tossed out or dumped onto a ...
7
votes
4answers
4k views

“The thing is, is that…”

This is a phrase I've heard many people use, and it sounds wrong to me; e.g.: The thing about that is, is that she might take it the wrong way. It seems to treat "The thing [...] is"—the entire ...
13
votes
7answers
2k views

How long does it take to mull something over?

I used the phrase "we'll mull it over" in an e-mail. My intent was to let the readers know that we (the team) needed to give it due consideration and come up with a considered response to their ...
5
votes
5answers
6k views

What does “the D word” mean in the context of discussing the pros and cons of marriage over co-habitation?

I came across a phrase unfamiliar to me, the D word, in an article of Time magazine (November 18, 2010 Issue) titled Who Needs Marriage? How an American institution is changing. The D word appears as ...
1
vote
3answers
4k views

“Which we discussed” vs. “about which we discussed”

Which one is correct? I’ve added changes/fixes which we discussed yesterday. or I’ve added changes/fixes about which we discussed yesterday.
4
votes
4answers
3k views

Meaning of “flip the script”

I’ve heard the phrase “flip your script” or “flip the script” in various hip-hop songs. What does it mean?
6
votes
5answers
929 views

“Something that work” or “something that works”?

Googling both sentences I find many references with or without -s. Should I add the -s to the verb after "that"? Is it considered a third person singular? I'm searching for a rule to apply to the ...