1
vote
0answers
37 views

When can a singular verb be used for multiple subjects separated with 'and'? [duplicate]

I read "Are" vs. "is" with compound subjects and http://www.grammar.cl/Present/ThereIsThereAre.htm, so this doesn't duplicate, because I ask about disparate subjects. I also tried ...
0
votes
2answers
184 views

“Could not have been” vs. “must not have been”

What's the difference between "could not have been" and "must not have been"? For example, That could not have been an easy task. That must not have been an easy task. I've seen both ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

“To refuse oneself” vs “to refuse”

In which cases can we use "to refuse oneself" instead of "to refuse"? Can you use "oneself" to give more emphasis to the sentence, or are you only allow to use it when you refuse something done to ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

Difference between “queue” and “enqueue” [closed]

What is the difference between queue and enqueue given that both are verbs?
1
vote
1answer
42 views

intermix vs mix

What are the differences? Are they everywhere interchangeable? Isn't intermix redundant, because if you mix A and B, then you must be mixing them together? For example, can mix be used in: Law and ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

Will marry vs will get married [duplicate]

I have seen both sentences below: I will get married. I will marry. So what is the difference? Which one is recommended? Is there any difference in meaning or just grammar?
1
vote
1answer
41 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
0
votes
1answer
163 views

Is there any difference between “invite to” and “invite for”?

Is there any difference between invite to and invite for in terms of usage and meaning? For example: invite someone to lunch, dinner, a party, or a meeting but invite them for a drink or a meal
-1
votes
3answers
167 views

How similar or different are “recant”, “repudiate”, “renounce” [closed]

Recant, repudiate, renounce are synonyms of abjure. I'm unclear as to how these terms may be utilized in different sentences. I will be delighted to see them all in one sentence. I seek efficient ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Meaning of “induce of” in letters by Thomas Jefferson

March 24th 1789 In Europe I doubt whether you can; because our government gives it’s offices on it’s own knowledge of persons, and not on the recommendations of others. They give their ...
1
vote
2answers
218 views

“Before it was too late” vs. “before it would be too late”

What is the difference between the sentences below? Mary decided to get pregnant before it was too late. Mary decided to get pregnant before it would be too late.
1
vote
1answer
145 views

Is there a difference between “to air” and “to broadcast”?

What is the difference, if any, in the use of the verbs to air and to broadcast?
1
vote
1answer
320 views

What is the difference between “start off” and “start”?

For me they both seem interchangeable, but I suspect there should be at least subtle difference in meaning. When it's more appropriate to use "start off" instead of just "start"?
1
vote
1answer
993 views

To find/get/take one's bearings

Is there any difference between these three expressions? to find one's bearings to get one's bearings to take one's bearings
0
votes
0answers
10 views

“I like something” vs. “I do like something” [duplicate]

I'm starting to learn English. I have a question. What is the difference between I like milk and I do like milk
2
votes
2answers
8k views

Difference between contract and catch [a disease]

What could be the difference between contracting a disease and catching a disease? I know there isn't any big difference. However, it looks like there are some diseases you can both catch and ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

“Happen to know” vs. “came to know” vs. “got to know” vs. “came across”

Can anyone give use cases and examples for Happen to know Came to know Got to know Came across I always gets confused in their uses.
2
votes
1answer
8k views

'There seem' or 'there seems' + usage of the word 'seem'

First, I have a question "How words 'seem' and 'there' are used together?" Which is correct: There seem ... or There seems ... Then, I'm am interested in general constructions with the word ...
1
vote
2answers
223 views

Difference between the words “validate” and “agree” [closed]

What is the difference between agreeing with a persons feelings and validating their feelings?
2
votes
5answers
7k views

Difference between “taxi” and “cab”

Definition of taxi: To ride or travel in a taxicab Definition of cab: A taxicab. Since the definitions don't show many differences, is it okay to assume that there is no difference ...
3
votes
2answers
369 views

“Suffer” vs. “suffer from”

I would like to know the difference between "suffer" and "suffer from". From the dictionary, I cannot distinguish between them. In particular, which of the following should I use: suffer ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

The difference between “delimit” and “limit”

In an article I came across the following sentence: "To delimit the responsibility of the police means to delimit human reason" I was just wondering why did the author use "delimit" instead of "limit" ...
1
vote
4answers
590 views

What is the difference between “splitting something” and “dividing something”?

What is the difference between "splitting something" and "dividing something"? When do people say split and when do they say divide?
5
votes
2answers
1k views

“Trawling through” or “trolling through”

There are quite a few discussions online about whether one can "trawl through" or "troll through", looking for something. From what I can see, both are fishing terms so both are legitimate in ...
0
votes
1answer
313 views

Should I say I work “for” or “with” my supervisor? [duplicate]

I have heard people saying both "I work for him" and "I work with him" when they are talking about their supervisors. But, since these people were not native English speakers, I could not figure out ...
0
votes
1answer
303 views

“Inspect” vs. “control” [closed]

Which of inspect or control is more appropriate when referring to action checking the operational state of something? Context: Workers are checking the operational state of a billboard with regards ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Are there any differences between “ascribe” and “attribute” when used as “because of”?

Are there any differences between "ascribe" and "attribute" when used as "because of"? The following two sentences, which one sounds more natural? The fall in the number of deaths from heart ...
1
vote
4answers
219 views

“It can be safely deleted” vs. “It can safely be deleted”

Is there a subtle difference between the following two sentences? It can be safely deleted. It can safely be deleted. If they mean the same thing, is one preferred for other reasons?
2
votes
4answers
522 views

“Implicate” vs. “incriminate”

I am exploring possible differences in the meanings of 'implicate/incriminate' from using different direct objects. Assume the context is police interrogation: He implicated/incriminated his ...
1
vote
1answer
233 views

What is the scope of using shelved, postponed, adjourned, put off?

postponed shelved adjourned put off Exactly as in this question, I have a problem with choosing the scope of using those synonyms of postponed. What is the scope of using each of them?
18
votes
5answers
2k views

“Infer” vs. “imply” — can “infer” imply “imply”?

Okay that's a crazy title, but bear with me. Got into a good natured discussion with someone on another stack exchange site, and I was "correcting" him on the use of infer vs. imply. (The ...
-1
votes
4answers
4k views

What is the difference between “anticipate” and “expect”?

My understanding is the following: I anticipate everyone will come here by 10. = "I hope it's gonna happen, but I'm not so sure about the result". I expect everyone will come here by 10. = ...
1
vote
2answers
533 views

“Release”, “free”, or “delete allocated memory”?

release the allocated memory. free the allocated memory. delete the allocated memory. What are the differences between them?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

'Has found' versus 'found' [duplicate]

When would one say "she has found her keys" as opposed to "she found her keys"? Are they equivalent, or at least partially equivalent? I'm not a native speaker and have been unable to find a pattern ...
1
vote
1answer
163 views

Differences in the Semantics of Three Tri-Part Phrasal Verbs

What are the subtle semantic differences in the following three tri-part phrasal verbs: (1) be up against (2) come up against (3) run up against
1
vote
1answer
827 views

“Need to” as an English Modal

In my studies of both theoretical and applied English linguistics, we studied English modals more than once. So a question came up on this site earlier today. I explained that "need to" is a modal. ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“It was my birthday yesterday” vs. “My birthday was yesterday”

Is there a difference between the following sentences? It was my birthday yesterday. My birthday was yesterday. When should I use "it was something yesterday/a few days ago/..." and when ...
0
votes
1answer
6k views

When to use “include” and “including”?

I know that include is a verb while including is a preposition but they made me confuse when it comes to their usage. I usually confuse when to use include with including. Most Thais like ...
2
votes
2answers
196 views

'Whack someone“ vs ” Whop someone“ vs ”Wallop someone"

I noticed that, in the dictionary, the words Whack, Whop and Wallop can have a meaning resembling hit some one hard. ODO says: Whack (Verb) = strike forcefully with a sharp blow. Whop (Verb) = ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

What is the difference between “dispute” and “argue”?

There were two English teachers who told me different answers. I'm confused. When I want to talk about two persons having different opinions, I have to say that "they dispute with each other" or "they ...
-1
votes
2answers
8k views

“I got it covered” vs “I've got it covered” [closed]

Which of the two sentences is correct and why: I got it covered. or I've got it covered. Edit: I am referring to usage that implies that you have something under control: Sally: Did ...
0
votes
2answers
517 views

“Feeding” data or “entering” data: which one is correct?

Which is the better verb to use with data: feeding or entering? Furthermore, which is more common in the literature of the field and which do people who work in the field say more often? Are they ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Regress” vs. “retrogress”

What do each of them mean exactly? Is either (or both) the opposite of "progress"? Could someone please explain the difference? To add some context: When I look up the definitions I see the ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Do “figure out” and “realize” mean the same? [closed]

Talking about noticing something, do both mean the same? For example: I just figured out that the ball is blue. I just realized that the ball is blue.
3
votes
3answers
10k views

“Gain/acquire/gather/get experience”

According to my Longman dictionary, gain experience and get experience seem to mean the same: gain/get experience: The programme enables pupils to gain some experience of the world of work. But ...
2
votes
4answers
380 views

“To latch in a recess/groove” vs. “to catch in a recess/groove”

Is there a difference in meaning when used in a technical context? For example, does a fork latch in a recess when pressed or does it catch in the recess?
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

what is the difference between “hook up with” and “have sex with”? [closed]

I would like to know the subtle difference between hook up and have sex. I'm asking because hook up seems have a subtly different meaning than have sex: in the situations I've heard this word it seems ...
3
votes
1answer
310 views

Meaning of “nip”

Nip is defined differently in two different dictionaries. From OALD, nip is defined as “to give somebody or something a quick painful bite or pinch”, whereas in MWLD, it is defined as “to bite or ...
2
votes
3answers
8k views

Difference between “explain” and “describe” [closed]

What is the difference between "explain" and "describe"? When to use one over the other?
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

“Learn” vs. “study” difference [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there any subtle difference between “to study” and “to learn”? What is the difference between "to learn" and "to study"? Can you study without ...