2
votes
3answers
49 views

What is the core meaning of the verb “set” in Modern English?

What is the core meaning of the verb "set" in Modern English? I wrote "to put (something or someone) in a particular place" in my assignment, but the teacher said it was wrong.
1
vote
7answers
127 views

Eliminate to be verb [closed]

How can I eliminate the weak "to be" verb (DOES) in the following sentence: She does not assist in accomplishing...
1
vote
3answers
87 views

Verb mix-up in a sentence

I have this sentence, and I have a feeling that the verbs and subjects do not agree with each other, and it continues to bother me. How can I fix it? Furthermore, both mates in a couple could also ...
0
votes
2answers
284 views

“Baby is creeping” vs. “baby is crawling” in AmE

Years and years ago, I remember reading in a book on AmE usage that the phrasal turn a baby creeps before it walks was to some extent more common to AmE than to BrE, which preferred exclusively the ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

“Fudge” vs. “dodge” (an issue, question, etc.), and “fudge” as another term for “cheat” in AE

In AE, can "fudge" and "dodge" be used just about interchangeably to convey the sense of circumvent [= avoid or try to avoid answering, fulfilling, or performing (duties, questions, issues, etc.)]? ...
6
votes
4answers
994 views

How is justice served?

Serve is a ditransitive verb: “I served him; I served him dinner.” Dinner is served when it is delivered; and a person is served when food is placed in front of him. In which sense is justice served ...
-1
votes
2answers
3k views

“Happen to know” vs. “came to know” vs. “got to know” vs. “came across”

Can anyone give use cases and examples for Happen to know Came to know Got to know Came across I always gets confused in their uses.
3
votes
2answers
192 views

“tear apart” or “rip apart” packaging?

What's the best verb to express that I opened the packaging of a product by tearing it off? Tear apart the packaging? Rip the packaging? Or is there any better verb or phrase to be used?
2
votes
0answers
225 views

Tri-Parts Phrasal Verbs and Categories [closed]

There seem to be three categories for tri-part phrasal verbs: genuine non-separable (come up with); flexible in that the final particle can be omitted (brush up (on); mandatory separable (talk (.) ...
3
votes
2answers
343 views

When did the term 'get lost' first come to use?

I have established that this term is an American idiom. Does anyone know when it came to be popular use or was first used there?
1
vote
3answers
26k views

“Please note” vs. “please notice” [closed]

When I'm writing a text and want to ask the reader to pay close attention to a point, should I write "Please note" or "Please notice"? Is there any difference?
3
votes
1answer
190 views

“Tabled”, US vs UK [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the meaning of the expression “We can table this”? Here's an example snippet for some context. Ann had an idea. We tabled her idea. In the UK this means ...
3
votes
3answers
310 views

He considers that X is Y. vs He thinks that X is Y

The following verb in sentence 1 strikes me as strange when it has the same meaning as in sentences 2 and 3 below. He considers that blue cheese is delicious. He thinks that blue cheese is ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

Synonyms for “curate” in US English

What synonyms are there for "curate", as in (to quote here) to select, organize, and present (suitable content, typically for online or computational use), using professional or expert knowledge ...
4
votes
2answers
267 views

Is “Songify” a well-received word as an English neology?

I came across the word “songify” for the first time in the article of October 23 NY Times titled ‘Yes We Chant’ with the sub-head, “The Gregory Brothers songify the debate, with Gregorian chanting.” ...
11
votes
4answers
353 views

Hire an employee (a consultant)?

I am trying to fill in this sentence: “My company is looking to ___ a consultant”. Is the correct term “hire” or is there a different word that is more fitting when talking about a consultant?
-2
votes
1answer
2k views

what is the difference between “hook up with” and “have sex with”? [closed]

I would like to know the subtle difference between hook up and have sex. I'm asking because hook up seems have a subtly different meaning than have sex: in the situations I've heard this word it seems ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Past tense of 'dive' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: UK English: Is “dived” a valid word? Can anybody explain the difference between dived and dove in the following sentence? He  __  in to the ...
0
votes
4answers
445 views

The first batch of special prizes “have vs. has” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “group” singular or plural? Which is correct? The first batch of special prizes has been distributed. The first batch of special prizes have been ...
-1
votes
3answers
769 views

What's the meaning of “root” in “you root for the favorite”? [closed]

What's the meaning of root in this context? You root for the favorite. You cry when they go away.
10
votes
6answers
2k views

Is using the present perfect old fashioned?

I was talking to a Singaporean (English is her native language. I think, closer to American rather than British) friend. I learned in English class that you can use present perfect when there is a ...
5
votes
2answers
419 views

Meaning of the verb “to pooch”?

I'm familiar with the word pooch as a cute synonym of doggy, but here is pooch used as a verb: It was just a poorly done deal and it just so happens to be the biggest deal ever for Nasdaq and they ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

“Have a breakfast” or “eat a breakfast” in AmE

Which expression do Americans prefer, have a breakfast or eat a breakfast?
7
votes
6answers
16k views

'Expired' or 'Passed away'?

When someone dies, do we say they expired or passed away? Does the word expired give any more respect when used? Or less respect than passed away?
1
vote
2answers
564 views

Difference between “engage” and “hire”

For example, "We decide to engage a lawyer for the case." "We decide to hire a lawyer for the case." Is engage used particularly in British English? Do speakers of American English use engage in ...
4
votes
2answers
9k views

“Interfere in” vs. “interfere with”

I was taught that when interfere is followed by in, it means to get involved in something that doesn't concern you; when followed by with, it means to prevent something from being done. And this is ...
13
votes
2answers
10k views

Why is the phrase “should have went” so widely used?

Rarely do we hear "should have gone" in common speech. Some background: My father immigrated to the US in the late 60s. He learned English first overseas, British English. Then he studied extensively ...
1
vote
3answers
206 views

Is “dawdle” a common verb in American English?

Is "dawdle" a common verb in American English? In my limited experience I have never heard Americans use it.
6
votes
4answers
12k views

Which is more correct: “burgled” or “burglarized”?

Which is more correct: We were burgled yesterday. or We were burglarized yesterday. I'm from the U.K. and never use burglarized but my friend from the U.S.A. seems to think it's OK.
24
votes
7answers
26k views

Can 'revert' be used as a synonym of 'reply'?

I am a native speaker of American English, and I have only ever heard this usage of the word revert from one person. This person is not a native English speaker (he is from India), so he may just be ...
16
votes
4answers
7k views

Can or should “ask” ever be used as a noun?

"The ask is that you provide me with..." I started hearing "ask" being used as a noun a few years ago. Is this a recent trend? Is it an East Coast thing, unique to North America, or just unique to ...
3
votes
3answers
17k views

Difference between “get” and “take”

What is the difference between "get" and "take"? Both are used to describe receiving something. By intuition I mostly guess which one to use, but would like to know some rule which will stick in my ...