Tagged Questions

Questions related to using as verbs words not commonly used as such.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
3answers
226 views

Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”

The chambers inside the pyramid were closed (to/for) visitors (to clean and repair/for cleaning and repairing). Which is the correct alternative in both the brackets, and why? Please explain in ...
13
votes
5answers
1k views

“Hello” as a verb

A dictionary says that Hello could be a verb, noun and interjection. I'm not sure I saw it to be a verb though. Q: Could someone provide an example of 'hello' where it's used as verb. In the meaning ...
6
votes
1answer
131 views

Is the suffix “-ize” particularly productive in the morphological domain of nouns ending in “-nym”?

On a recent question asking if acronymize is a word, a comment caught my attention: Why bother to acronymize? If I'm going to take such liberties, I might as well just acronym the text. This ...
-1
votes
1answer
94 views

“buying cookies will deliver on our promise” - can I use subject and verb like this?

A bit of context: a couple decided not to spend money on unecessary stuff and they promised that to each other. Later, one of them says: I dont believe that buying cookies will deliver on our ...
-1
votes
2answers
418 views

“I can command English.”

I saw a sentence: "I would like to be a scientist who can command English." What do you think about usage of "command"? Should we say " ...who has a good command of English."? Could you please ...
3
votes
1answer
156 views

To “Macgyver” or to “macgyver”?

I recently came across this usage “we Macgyver…” and the use of the upper case caught my attention. I googled the word to see if it is mentioned in the dictionary; it gave me this result, for ...
2
votes
2answers
230 views

Is it correct English to turn interjections such as “ah”, “oh”, “um” “huh”, “hem” into verbs?

For example: she ahhed/ohhed/ummed/huhhed/hemmed. Or is this possible only with some interjections?
8
votes
3answers
17k views

Which nouns can be used as verbs?

Someone told me that the English language is special (compared to German, at least) in the way that every noun could be used as a verb. I think this phenomenon is called supine. Is this correct? ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
0
votes
1answer
332 views

Is the word “Einstein” a verb? [closed]

I know that a lot of people use the word "Einstein" to convey someone as a genius, but I was wondering if Einstein, as a verb, is an official term.
14
votes
5answers
791 views

Can a noun (such as “duct tape”) be used as a verb?

I found the phrase “duct-tape together” in the following sentence of a Washington Post (June 21) article written by Chris Cillizza under the title “Gingrich campaign hit by more departures.” The ...
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Can “snob” be used as a verb?

I commonly see "snob someone off", where the word they should correctly use is snub. Is using "snob" as a verb forever a no-no? Is it creeping towards accepted usage?
4
votes
3answers
922 views

Is it possible to verb anything other than a noun?

Is it possible to verb anything other than a noun? Although slightly meta, I noticed that English SE has verbing as a tag, rather than verbing-nouns.
12
votes
3answers
2k views

Should capitals be used when verbing trademarks?

When using a trademark as a verb ("hoovering", "xeroxing", "photoshopping" and "googling"), should it be capitalized or uncapitalized? Strictly speaking, Google and Adobe are opposed to their ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns

In an answer to another question, steven_desu argued that it was “technically incorrect” to use the word “e-mail” or “email” as a verb because it stands for “electronic mail.” I do not argue whether ...