How and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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241 views

Is “cause” instead of “because” becoming Standard English?

Nowadays, I'm seeing a drastic increase in usage of cause in place of because, especially in written English. People are in such a hurry, that a statement like below passes off like Standard English: ...
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2answers
28 views

Am I using “as well as” right?

I would like to ask whether my usage here is right or wrong: Inman had started a long journey. He met persons who helped him, as well as persons who tried to turn him in to the Black Guard whose ...
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2answers
21 views

“use some rest” vs. “take some rest” vs. “get some rest”?

"use some rest" vs. "take some rest" vs. "get some rest" which one is correct, if i want to tell my friend to go to relax or take some nap. The phrase "take some rest" is familiar me but i also have ...
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3answers
22k views

Reservation “under the name”, “in the name”, or “by the name” of Ms. X

Which idiom of "by the name", "under the name", and "in the name" is appropriate for reservations? e.g. There's a reservation by the name of Cullen... She made the reservation in the name of Jordan ...
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1answer
50 views

Does English have an expression like “nth day”?

In my native language, if today is 1st and Sunday and we want to refer to the next Sunday (on 8th) then we may say the "today's eighth day" or just "8th day". For example if you're asking when does ...
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1answer
19 views

How should I use “just as .. so ..” phrase

I have not understood the usage of the phrase "just as .. so" yet. When should I use it ? What is it meant for ?
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1answer
24 views

Correct preposition to follow “ineptitude”?

I wish to express John's inability to do a certain activity, e.g. cycling, by using "ineptitude" plus a preposition. Which preposition is most appropriate/accepted? "At" + gerund? "For" + gerund? ...
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0answers
22 views

“Hereinafter” usage question

If I use "hereinafter" in a formal document in order to announce I'm abbreviating something can I use the full version afterwards or do I have to stay with the abbreviated version from there on out? ...
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2answers
36 views

How should I place “Indeed” in sentence

I would like to say sorry first for my bad english, and I hope you understand me . I have been improving my english recently and I thought about adding "indeed" into my essays , I have certainly ...
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56 views

Exaggeration of … into

I'm studying for the GRE and came across the following question: "Recent years have witnessed the posthumous inflation of the role of the hobbyist Alice Austen into that of a pioneering ...
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5answers
188 views

Can “weren't” be used in reference to a singular noun?

I've been watching a TV sitcom lately, "Last Tango in Halifax." A main character uses "weren't" instead of "wasn't" and I am wondering if that is considered correct in some areas or dialects? For ...
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2answers
4k views

what is the difference in usage of 'pertain' and 'appertain'?

In the dictionary the meanings of these two words seem interchangeable so why do the two words exist? Are there different contexts for their usage? Definitions by Merriam-Webster: Definition of ...
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1answer
97 views

“Caldoniafied” In General Use in the 1980s?

I am curious about the word "Caldoniafied" meaning, roughly, hard headed, and presumably coming from the song entitled "Caldonia" ("Caldonia, Caldonia, what makes your big head so hard?". )Louis ...
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3answers
54 views

to have fun “on a journey” vs “in a journey”

Richard Branson in an interview with Motivated magazine was quoted as saying: To have fun in [my] journey through life and learn from [my] mistakes. Source: PERSONAL MISSION STATEMENTS OF 5 ...
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3answers
82 views

The house of a friend of Bob’s

How do I say (a friend of Bob’s)’s house? It’s like a double possesive. Bob’s friends are a class of people. Tom, a friend of Bob’s denotes that he is one among Bob’s friends. Now what if I want to ...
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1answer
32 views

Is the word “constraint” used appropriately in my sentence? [on hold]

I have some imperial equations to estimate seepage from irrigation canals. In these equations some coefficients have been used . These coefficients are based on soil type. Unfortunately there is no ...
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3answers
178 views

To laugh over vs. about

Most of the time when I need to reference something using the word "laugh", my go-to preposition is "about". However, at times, "over" sounds much more adequate in day-to-day use. The big question, ...
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2answers
58 views

Which one is correct-“life” or “lives”? [closed]

I am not sure about what is correct use of words in the following line: They lost their lives saving our lives. or They lost their life saving our lives.
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1answer
45 views

Kudos to you and its usage [closed]

What does Kudos to you exactly mean? Can I use it instead of"Bravo"? I hear it a lot in "Californication".
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1answer
7k views

Is “keep updated” proper usage of those words?

I'm far from being an English major, but I have a simple question. If someone were to say keep updated in a sentence, is that correct? I know the usage, tense, and other things matter, but is it ...
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1answer
18 views

“Handling of Task 1” or “Handling Task 1”

I am working on my thesis and included is a subsection in which I describe how a part of a class of my program handles the task I have been assigned for the thesis. To give you an idea of what the ...
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4answers
63 views

Are there instances when a new term has been purposely introduced into the language and actually put to use?

I am thinking of the suggested use of ze as an alternative for he or she. I cannot think of an example where such a thing has actually been adopted and put to general use.
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1answer
41 views

Say “you guys” to a group of people [duplicate]

Can we say "guys" to a group of people, that group possibly including women? Example sentence: I am looking forward to see you guys then!
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1answer
137 views

Use/non-use of articles before Adjective + Abstract noun

I have confusion regarding use/non-use of articles before adjective + abstract noun. Eg. competent handling, prolonged tread life, enhanced durability Providing COMPETENT HANDLING and PROLONGED TREAD ...
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2answers
35 views

Whereafter or where after, one or two words?

If I Google the word whereafter, multiple online dictionaries claim it is one word. However, if I type it in Microsoft Outlook, then spellcheck insists that it is two words. Grammarly seems to accept ...
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2answers
110 views

Can we use “shore” referring to river?

I saw the usage of "shore" with "river" in a modern American book, however my dictionary says that we should use "bank" with "river". Are there any difference between using "shore" and "bank" or maybe ...
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1answer
28 views

This is true or That is true?

When someone says something that you agree with, should you say "that's true" or "this is true"? I have heard people say it both ways. My question is for both formal and informal usage.
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5answers
663 views

Does “Smugness” imply “Having or showing low opinions of others”?

I have a little confusion whether "smugness" implies a "low opinion of others" in contrast to a "high opinion of oneself" I have consulted ODO and wiktionary; they showed the meaning of "Smugness" is ...
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1answer
45 views

Past perfect and perfect continuous: a difference in meaning? [closed]

The pavement was wet, it had been raining. The pavement was wet, it had rained. What's the difference?
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3answers
3k views

Why “like doing something” or “like to do something” but only “dislike doing something”?

At a further education course for teachers, in Switzerland, (given by two native speakers of English), someone came up with the question of whether you could say "dislike doing something" and "dislike ...
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2answers
40 views

Can “it's” be used as a question? [duplicate]

In my experience, people say "it's" in place of "it is," but never in the form of a question. I think the question "It's?" sounds awkward, but I'd like to know if it's grammatically correct. Is it? ...
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2answers
22 views

“Sensor outputs” or “sensors' outputs”?

I acquire measurements from several sensors, and I need to filter these signals. Is there a difference between the two sentences below? The sensors' outputs are filtered. The sensor outputs are ...
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2answers
147 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
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1answer
43 views

Ellipsis followed by another statement - Is it still correct English/use of punctuation?

In transcripts (mainly screenplays/dialogue scripts and some web pages), I see the following: "You could try to do this... or that." CHARACTER gestures at the alternate choice; a big red ...
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2answers
60 views

Word with -ee as a suffix

Is it correct English to be able to add the suffix -ee on to any verb to show the object of that verb? Ex: Abandonee is "one to whom something is abandoned" Observee is "one who is observed" ...
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1answer
38 views

Proper usage of “assessed” for delinquent bills

Delinquent bills will be assessed a USD 100 (United States Dollar One Hundred Only) charge if payment is not received within 7 days of the due date. Is this the correct usage? Or should the word ...
3
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2answers
75 views

If I were to have or If I should have [duplicate]

I am not native English. My question regards the conditional form of the verb have to, must. I was wondering if I could use in interchangeable way the expressions "If I were to have" and "If I should ...
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2answers
55 views

'Relates to' vs. 'Is Related to'

Does the choice between passive/active voice make any difference in the examples below? My question relates to your earlier work. My question is related to you earlier work. Nerve cells relate to ...
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1answer
80 views

As to grammar and idiom, is the following extract correct: “… if you know the man or are him, call …”?

Obviously, my questions refers to the pronoun him. Am I wrong to suppose that the use of the subject case pronoun he instead of him would not improve the previous statement? What about this one: “… if ...
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1answer
44 views

Usage of Quicker and more quickly [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences are correct? Calves require less medication and gain weight quicker than that those raised in consignment. Calves require less medication and gain weight more ...
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2answers
44 views

Help with usage: Having had? [closed]

Is this proper usage? "I feel good despite not having had any coffee today."
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0answers
18 views

Genitive case in a sentence where two proper nouns are used [duplicate]

Which of the two sentences is correct: Ion's and Zoe's daughter is at home. or Ion and Zoe's daughter is at home
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2answers
62 views

How do we use the word “landfall” in a sentence?

May I ask for a specific sentence using the word "landfall"? which has a definition of: a reaching of land as by a traveler, craft, or storm according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. ...
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3answers
317 views

“First, second, last” vs “first because, second because, last because.”

When to use the former or the latter? Example: I picked NTU Library. First, (because) it was my university's library, so I wouldn't have to walk very far. Second, (because) I liked the ...
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1answer
37 views

What is the difference between “broke” and “was broken”?

What is the difference between "broke" and "be broken" in the following? The pot broke as I kicked it. The pot was broken as I kicked it.
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1answer
48 views

Where does the term “sleeve fish” come from?

I was in a snack shop and reading the labels and came across "Thailand Sleeve Fish Slice" on what appeared to be a package of dried squid. I found limited results indicating that it does seem to refer ...
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3answers
101 views

What does the west wind signify to New Yorkers?

The New Yorker carries the archives of entertaining old articles. Among them there was a short piece titled “The street and into the grill” written by E.B. White and published in October 1950. A man ...
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2answers
67 views

Can “did you…” be conditional?

Let me know, should you come. Like the one above, I've seen many sentences that had inverted conditionals which started with should, were, and had--but not with could, did, or have. So I wonder if ...
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48 views

Is a second 'they' needed here?

Dogs can walk, but can't fly. Dogs can walk, but they can't fly. Which sentence is correct? Is the "they" required?
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1answer
28 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct as written?

Germany's assessment of the progress in negotiations was at odds with France's expectations towards it.