For questions on how and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
2answers
45 views

Usage : Am yet to read those

Conversation : A- I am reading the Harry potter series. B- I am yet to read those. or is it better to use "I am yet to read them" or is there a better alternative?
3
votes
5answers
199 views

Collective “linens” vs. “linen” in AmEng vernacular

What's the difference in using the uncountable noun linen either in the plural or in the singular to refer to articles or garments, such as sheets, tablecloths, or underwear? How did originally ...
7
votes
1answer
70 views

Is 'take a sauna' the correct expression?

I'm not a native English speaker and I was just wondering if take a sauna is a correct way to say that I'm going to sauna, the same way you can say take a shower. I have tried to search this up ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

“call someone/something” vs. “call someone/something up” for "make a phone call to someone/something

What's the difference between call and call up to mean make a telephone call to? Is the latter any more informal than the former, or is it mainly a regional thing? call someone or something up ...
0
votes
2answers
133 views

Exaggeration of … into

I'm studying for the GRE and came across the following question: "Recent years have witnessed the posthumous inflation of the role of the hobbyist Alice Austen into that of a pioneering ...
-1
votes
2answers
40 views

Use of catch you “in some time” [on hold]

I had an interesting discussion regarding this. We (non-native speakers) tend to transliterate the words in English whilst trying to convey our message. I have often seen here, people use this ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

scene to vs scene of

I am a non-native speaker wondering which of the following sentences would read more naturally to a native speaker: The market looked like it had been the scene of a mass murder. The market ...
-1
votes
0answers
19 views

Is 'and all' grammatically correct? [on hold]

People around me use the word 'and all' a lot and I feel it's not grammatically correct. For example, they say, people and all, subjects and all, students and all. Please let me know.
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Usage of Too… to

In school, I learned too... to... as an expression, like I am too tired to stand or It is too early to sleep. But sometimes I want to say something like I think 30 days on trip is good, it is not ...
4
votes
3answers
8k views

Is there any difference between “word-for-word translation” and “word-by-word translation” and is the latter actually valid?

First off, some data: According to COCA word-for-word has 60 usages, 3 of them are "word-for-word translation". Word-by-word has 26 usages, none of them are "word-by-word translation" (but some with ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

How should “that” be used?

I am an audio transcriber. One of my clients systematically dictates sentences such as : I feel that, if the company wanted to use the procedure, that it would seem likely it would have to .. To ...
8
votes
1answer
682 views

Source of the phrase “call [somebody] out of name”

I was introduced today to the phrase "Call out of name" as in: She claimed the other girl called her out of name. I had to ask what it meant and the answer was "she called her a bitch". I'm ...
0
votes
0answers
4 views

what is meaning of subject to in the following sentence [migrated]

hello there I m Sajid and I exceptionally confounded about the utilization of subject to what is the significance of subject to in this taking after the sentence? This was partially because ...
1
vote
1answer
31 views

Pant legs or pants legs?

With all this I don't see the answer to which is the correct form "He rolled up his pant legs" or "he rolled up his pants legs."
2
votes
2answers
23 views

Use of the word competent

Can you use competent in the context of an inanimate object such as an instruction manual, or a voltmeter? e.g. "In my opinion Standard 12345 is considered a competent document." or "The potentials ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“most” vs “the most”, specifically as an adverb at the end of sentence

Which one of the following sentences is the most canonical? I know most vs. the most has been explained a lot, but my doubts pertain specifically which one to use at the end of a sentence. Do you ...
-2
votes
1answer
47 views

'Everyone make' or' everyone makes'? [on hold]

Which one's the correct one? 1. Everyone make mistakes. 2. Everyone makes mistakes. And why?
1
vote
2answers
39 views

Equal vs Equivalent: Finer differences in meaning and usage?

Equal vs Equivalent: Finer differences in meaning and usage? What would be the subtler differences & similarities? Examples & scenarios where: Only one can be used Both can be used One ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Present Perfect usage in a sentence; continue with the same tense or move to Past Simple?

I've been rewriting a known quote: Curiosity killed the cat, but satisfaction brought it back. I used the Present Perfect and turned the quote into: Curiosity has killed the cat, but ...
2
votes
4answers
69 views

Can you be ill from an injury (I don't mean an infection) [duplicate]

This is something that crops up on the BBC a lot and irks me. For example, from a story today: One woman is critically ill and three others have been injured after they were stabbed near a ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Is this correct? : “Tenji that was, died in his sisters arms.” (Kind of like 'powers that be') Also is 'have a claim to' correct' or 'hold a claim to'

Full quote for context "I have no claim to life, yet I walk. I have no claim to valor, yet I fight. I have no claim to love, yet I mourn. I am not the dragon, for Tenji Minamoto that was, died in his ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

“If I have some questions I will write you” [migrated]

I need to know if it's OK to use have and some in this sentence, and why? If I have some questions I will write you. I've been told it is more typical to use any here instead of some. Is there a ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

Usage of Lets vs Let's for 'Let us' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Let's” vs. “lets”: which is correct? Lets now see how it can be done. Let's now see how it can be done. Is sentence 1 wrong? If so, why? ...
8
votes
2answers
332 views

“the 'first/last' of the [day/night/week, etc.]” for "the 'beginning/end' of the [day/night/week, etc.]

Where in the U.S. and Canada do they say, at the first/last of [the day/night/week, etc.] for at the beginning/end of [the day/night/week, etc.]? Luck had it that they only experienced a very ...
30
votes
6answers
6k views

What is the difference between Ukraine and the Ukraine?

Time magazine (March 5th) carries the article titled, “Ukraine, not the Ukraine: The significance of three little letters,” in which the following comment of William Taylor, who served as the U.S. ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Should “something, and therefore something” be referred to as singular or plural?

For example, if I have the sentence Due to the improvement of our algorithm, our model, and therefore simulation, becomes more realistic. Should the becomes be instead written as become? Does ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

“Handling of Task 1” or “Handling Task 1”

I am working on my thesis and included is a subsection in which I describe how a part of a class of my program handles the task I have been assigned for the thesis. To give you an idea of what the ...
2
votes
3answers
72 views

Should “riffraff”, when used as a subject, be treated as a singular or a plural noun?

riffraff (noun) people who are not respectable : people who have very low social status. Merriam-Webster doesn't say anything about number. The Free Dictionary says it can sometimes ...
1
vote
1answer
142 views

Usage of “imperative to [verb]ing”

From what I learned, we could use imperative to [verb]ing, but when I read my book, I see this sentence: An accurate analysis of surveys is imperative to building a good understanding of customer ...
10
votes
5answers
1k views

“He's unarguably the best” or “He's arguably the best”

I keep hearing the phrases unarguably the best and arguably the best. Some people say one, some people say the other when they mean he's the best. However which one is actually correct? If he's ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Question on Garner's explanation of subjunctive

I'm puzzled by an example given in Garner's Modern English Usage illustrating correct use of the subjunctive mood. In this example, Garner offers both the incorrect and the correct usage: "But the ...
0
votes
3answers
58 views

How do you write “and” in short form?

How do you write "and" in short form like w/o as in "without"?? It's not "&" but some other form. I used to write it but I forgot since I dont live in the US. Please help me remind it. Thanks
2
votes
0answers
86 views

Does “mouse” in the computer sense come from nautical slang?

Computer "mouse" is an English term known and used worldwide. Reference about its origin appears to suggest that the term, which obviously refers to the shape of a small mouse, may actually come ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

Is the usage “how many ever” correct?

Eg : You may use it how many ever time. I know the sentence can be phrased better but I just wanted to given an example. So my question is, Is "how many ever" a correct usage?
0
votes
2answers
68 views

What our students have to say. Grammar question

I often hear the phrase "what our students have to say" in testimonials, and I am confused with the grammar here. It can be taken in two ways as follows. 1) Our students have something (what) to say ...
-1
votes
1answer
33 views

Dealing with usage where nouns or pronouns are treated as adjectives

"That is so Dave!" I had a discussion of this on another forum where I said that 'Dave' is being treated here as an adjective. The only responses I got were on the lines of "'Dave' is a noun." And to ...
-1
votes
0answers
28 views

A people - is it correct? [migrated]

Puls Biznesu reported that the idea of the book was to give a people an opportunity to communicate abroad in a universal language - pictures. Is it right to place the indefinite article "a" before ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Speaker Paul Ryan said “encouraged with” but media is saying “Ryan encouraged by”. Why?

*Note: The first half of this question, in bold, is streamlined and expresses the gist of my message. You can skip the second half of the question if you would rather not slog through all my ...
1
vote
2answers
311 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Western end or West end? [closed]

"I proposed on the west/ern end of the beach" Which one's correct?
4
votes
1answer
102 views

Colloquial use of “to dip”

So, "dip" has come to mean "leave" in American slang. As in, "Let's dip," i.e. "Let's get out of here." How did that happen? The best I could come up with is: a dip in the road obscures vision, so if ...
0
votes
1answer
166 views

As to grammar and idiom, is the following extract correct: “… if you know the man or are him, call …”?

Obviously, my questions refers to the pronoun him. Am I wrong to suppose that the use of the subject case pronoun he instead of him would not improve the previous statement? What about this one: “… if ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

In what contexts is the word fertile used in this manner, and is it ridiculous or at best misleading?

I have seen a very strange definition for fertile. OED fertile: 1. Bearing or producing in abundance; fruitful, prolific. Const. of, in, rarely to. a. lit. of the soil, a district or region, ...
17
votes
5answers
22k views

the USA vs the US

I am writing an essay where I need to make a reference to the United States of America. Often I hear this shortened to the US, but sometimes people also say the USA. Are there any difference between ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

Different usage of had [closed]

Do we always have to use a particular time of a past event when we use 'had'. As I have heard its a past in past. Because I have come accross many statements where the writers donot use had with a ...
-1
votes
1answer
46 views
20
votes
3answers
3k views

Is it “chalk it up to” or “chock it up to”?

Grammarist & Our beloved StackExchange both say that the phrase "Chalk it up to" dates back to, among other things, debts being tallied on a chalkboard. However, when I hear the phrase "chock it ...
2
votes
1answer
17 views

May / might usage based on the probability of the event happening [duplicate]

I just taught may / might and the book tells the students that, "you use 'may' with things that have around a 50% chance of happening and might with a 30% chance". Is this true? I, for one, use ...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Is it okay to omit “a” with “going for”? [migrated]

Is it okay to ask: Are we going for film? Or is it compulsory to add "a"? Are we going for a film?