How and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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2
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2answers
69 views

Why do we say “be to blame”, not “be to be blamed”?

I wonder why "be to blame" is used rather than "be to be blamed"? I've googled it, and what I found is that it is considered as an idiomatic expression.
1
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1answer
33 views

crash as a transitive verb [on hold]

Is it correct to use crash as a transitive verb ? And is there a less awkward sounding way to say for example; the pilot crashed the airplane ?
1
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6answers
200 views

Is there a single word that refers to a vagina secreting lubricant in response to sexual arousal?

I'm seeking a single word. An analogue is "salivate" which is what someone sometimes does when they experience hunger and refers to the mouth secreting liquid. "Elsa was hungry and began salivating" ...
1
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2answers
45 views

The order of “twice” and “the” [on hold]

I have read this sentence. And I happen to wonder if the order of "twice the" is right or not. "It was a space in London, in Kensington and it went on sale for 400,000 pound, which is over twice the ...
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2answers
451 views

I know or I do know

I have seen people using I do know that. instead of I know that. Is this usage correct?
0
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0answers
44 views

Are there any clear explanations for these trends?

I was curious earlier about the use of various pronouns / possessives in English (primarily first person), so I chose a selection of them and was surprised to discover that, among other oddities, "I" ...
3
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2answers
73 views

What is the meaning of “Jane raised the lights.” [on hold]

It seems the idea of the author of above sentence is to say that Jane raised the lighting of a stage where a performance was being done. Is that correct usage, especially when 'lights' is plural? I am ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

I am going to spray water on you

I am looking for a sentence to say when you are in a situation where you want to put some drops of water from your wet hands onto someone else's body, by flickering your fingers. What would be an ...
0
votes
1answer
62 views

Using property name in plural instead of its units

Consider describing an object and referring to some of its properties, that has a unit (eg. weight in kilograms). Is it correct to describe the property not by saying what unit is it in, but using ...
2
votes
2answers
156 views

“You just won the lottery? Chapeau!”

"You just won the lottery? Chapeau!" This is the first time I have seen such usage in English. Literally 'Chapeau' means 'hat', but the intention (that I get from the internet) is something ...
0
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2answers
351 views

When did replacing “yes” with “absolutely” come into common usage?

Replacing simple, concise words with longer, more obscure ones has long been a hallmark of bureaucratic reports and student papers. Consider the response "yes" (and its other less formal variants) ...
0
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0answers
45 views

Use of 'My' vs. 'Me' as in 'Me doing something'? [duplicate]

So I believe I've heard this before but I'm not entirely sure, nor am I sure if it's correct grammatically or not: using the word 'my' instead of 'me' with some form of 'doing'. Here's an example: ...
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3answers
38 views

Participants' vs Participantses [on hold]

So I know an apostrophe is used to show possession. E.g The participant's book. However, what if I wanted to show possession with several participants? If I was referring to the scores of each ...
2
votes
2answers
160 views

Is “offloading a passenger” idiomatic?

Merriam-Webster and Oxford seem to suggest that we can offload things, not people, yet "offloading a passenger" is quite prevalent in Philippine English. Is it a phrase that somebody from the inner ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

What does it mean by “has to say”? [closed]

I would like to add more about my question. Rob and Finn were the hosts at the learning English program. They wanted to listen to an expert about their topic. So, they said "Let's listen to what the ...
-1
votes
0answers
15 views

Email etiquette book [closed]

Could any one please suggest me a book name or any particular website to improve my business email writing skill. Thanks in advance.
-2
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1answer
910 views

Why does the word 'calculative' not exist in the Oxford dictionary?

My friends and I have been using 'calculative' and not 'calculating' to describe a person given to doing or planning things only for their benefits; but it seems like we have been wrong for so long. ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
1
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1answer
116 views

Meaning and use of “would have to be” in this sentence

I'm a beginner of English and really appreciate that you can help me learn more. I noticed a sentence: I think all the girls in the anime are awesome, but my favorites would have to be Nozomi and ...
3
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2answers
74 views

What does “About its lot” mean?

In Douglas Adams' Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency, Chapter 2, when talking about how long the Electric Monk believed silly things, the book says: How long did the Monk believe these ...
0
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4answers
491 views

Recordkeeping, record keeping, or record-keeping

In the following sentence, a reviewer claimed that record keeping is a spelling error that should be corrected to recordkeeping. Service providers shall manage information using agreed upon ...
2
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3answers
80 views

Is “Thrashing Win” an oxymoron?

According to me, a "crushing defeat" and a "thrashing win" are opposites. I have always seen the usage of these two terms in sports. But I have seldom seen the usage of "thrashing defeat". Is ...
0
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1answer
30 views

“generations now past” - is “now” appropriate here?

...structure will stand for generations to come, just as it did for generations now past... Is the word now grammatically correct in this usage or even necessary?
0
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2answers
198 views

Corporates - is there any such word? [closed]

The use of "corporates" as a word to mean companies, organizations, etc., has been gaining popularity of late, at least here in India. Although I believe it is standard to speak of "corporate" life, ...
0
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3answers
43 views

Trustable or trustworthy?

For a long time I have been using trustworthy as the adjective for of trust. However, I recently heard someone say trustable, and it piqued my interest. Apparently it is a word on Merriam-Webster as ...
0
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2answers
41 views

Which preposition follows “in the week” when denoting a specific week of the year?

I'm pretty sure that the correct preposition is of: I'll probably start working on this issue in the week of June, 8th. However, there are thousands of hits on Google using the preposition from. ...
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2answers
107 views

… to feel sick Tuesday afternoon / on Tuesday afternoon / from Tuesday afternoon. Which one is correct?

Are these all correct? He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick Tuesday afternoon. He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick on Tuesday afternoon. He was feeling ...
0
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1answer
28 views

'Accessory' vs 'included' as adjective (BE)

I'm wondering about the use of the word 'accessory' as an adjective. Would it be preferable in BE to say something like 'This DJ controller comes with accessory headphones'? I feel that 'This DJ ...
0
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0answers
30 views

The use of 'contract'

Is it right to say 'He is contracted with a virus which causes his immunity to be weak against diseases'? Can the word 'contract' be used with 'with'? Thanks.
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2answers
65 views

Do usage errors exist?

...for the descriptive linguist? I've noticed that some users on English Stack Exchange, and some reference works, tend to answer questions about word usage by referring to how words are used in ...
0
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1answer
36 views

Would an “affector” be appropriate for an event driver?

I'm trying to come up with a better word to describe a "driver" or "conditional"; basically, the name of an object or event which is a trigger for something else. Would it be appropriate to say that ...
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3answers
2k views

Does ‘sugarplum’ have the meaning of ‘honey’ or ‘sweetie’?

There is the following advice for ‘defusing an argument with one word’ in a website: In an argument in which the fight systems are fully armed you need to provide an abrupt interruption. Have a ...
5
votes
2answers
85 views

In what situations would a native English speaker omit the last g in an -ing verb?

Examples: I'm sick of following my dreams. I'm just going to ask them where they're goin', and hook up with them later. -Mitch Hedberg The jazz boom was goin' on then so there was a lot ...
5
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3answers
324 views

Usage of hain't

According to Dictionary.com, ain't has two meanings: Nonstandard except in some dialects. am not; are not; is not. Nonstandard. have not; has not; do not; does not; did not. When I ...
5
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3answers
419 views

Is there a rule about using the adverb “utterly” followed by negative adjectives?

I have noticed that most of the time it is the case in usage, but I'm not sure if it is a rule or not. I. e. would it be right to say "utterly wonderful" or does it sound oxymoronic? Thanks
3
votes
4answers
315 views

“Cousined to them” expression [closed]

What is the expression that sounds like "cousined to them" meaning accepted or gotten used to? For example, The city councilors passed the building code but the planning department was set in ...
13
votes
1answer
613 views

How is “erogenous” incorrectly formed?

When I check the etymology of erogenous in OED, it is mentioned that it is incorrectly formed (along with erogenic). Etymology of erogenous from OED: formed as erogenic adj. + -ous suffix. ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

“Sitting room”, “lounge”, “lounge room”, and “front room”

Each of these terms seem to be used to designate a room, in a private house or in the front of a public facility, where one can sit and relax and talk. But, are there any differences to them -- or do ...
-3
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1answer
57 views

usage of adverb never [closed]

Is this sentence correct? "We had a fight and never spoke again". I think the verb "spoke" should be either in simple present or present perfect, shouldn't it?
0
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3answers
2k views

Confused on how to use “instead” in the middle of a sentence

I am dumbfounded on why the man does not spring for Walton’s help, instead, he makes sure the vessel is headed North. I'm confused on how to use "instead" in the middle of my sentence. Is that ...
0
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3answers
3k views

Difference between control and manage?

They seem to function the same. Manage is even "control in action or use" according to http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/manage. Control is a verb so isn't that in action as well? Thus, is it the ...
0
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2answers
53 views

Does “is that ok for you?” means the same of “does that work for you?”

Do they mean exactly the same? Is one form more formal/casual than other? Can I say one of them in a email that is not very formal?
1
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2answers
60 views

How to explain an acronym inside a quote [duplicate]

I'm currently doing an essay and I haven't previously given context "private contractors with top secret clearance had access to GCHQ databases." how d I explain what GCHQ is? Is this correct? ...
3
votes
2answers
246 views

Is there a name for words which are pronounced differently depending on which definition is being used?

I was thinking about the word "fillet" recently. When I teach high school freshmen about the word (in a machining/engineering context), they refuse to believe that it is pronounced "FILL-it," rather ...
2
votes
2answers
26 views

Can laboring and belaboring be used in the same way?

While reading the book, Nine Algorithms That Changed the Future (amazon link), I came upon the following sentence: I know I am laboring this point, but the reason for going through this example ...
0
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2answers
155 views

Usage of “I'm incredulous!” as an exclamation of shock or disbelief

Would the exclamation "I'm incredulous!" be an appropriate response to finding out some unexpected news, if the intention is to convey shock or disbelief?
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2answers
46 views

Prediction / Foreshadow verb

What is a way to say "as you _____ mentioned" where _____ is meant to convey that the person correctly predicted / foreshadowed your response?
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0answers
19 views

Is it “is” or “are” in “There is/are two of us here”? [duplicate]

I have a question, which one of these sentences would be grammatically correct, or can they both be? There is two of us here. Or, There are two of us here.
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3answers
72 views

Rules for verb usage

I'm fairly new to the world of linguistics and this is my first post in this forum. I've been helping a friend to learn English and one of her questions has me stumped, even as a native speaker. She ...
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0answers
12 views

Question about usage of the article “the” [duplicate]

Although I have learned English for over 20 years, using articles is still confusing for me. Sometimes I do'nt understand why the is used like in these cases: Shoot for the stars -> This is ...