For questions on how and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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4answers
9k views

Is there any difference between “word-for-word translation” and “word-by-word translation” and is the latter actually valid?

First off, some data: According to COCA word-for-word has 60 usages, 3 of them are "word-for-word translation". Word-by-word has 26 usages, none of them are "word-by-word translation" (but some with "...
5
votes
10answers
324 views

Speaker Paul Ryan said “encouraged with” but media is saying “Ryan encouraged by”. Why?

*Note: The first half of this question, in bold, is streamlined and expresses the gist of my message. You can skip the second half of the question if you would rather not slog through all my ...
4
votes
1answer
51 views

What are some less ambiguous words for “choice,” “decision,” “option,” etc.?

1) You come to a fork in the road. You need to make a choice between going left or right. You face a decision between the left path and the right path. You have the option to advance in either ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

When to use “most” or “the most”

I came across with this sentence and it cast me doubt the usage of "most" and "the most" The sentence states: "But what I remembered most is moving a lot" Would it change the meaning of the ...
-1
votes
0answers
20 views

Please let me know [on hold]

What is the difference between and are they both correct? 1.That has got to be the smallest foot I have ever seen. 2.That is the smallest foot I have ever seen. Thanks.
2
votes
2answers
31 views

usage of “but” in a sentence

can anyone tell me the meaning of "There was not anyone in the room but liked his singing" Is this sentence correct and if it is, then could anyone explain to me it's meaning.
8
votes
1answer
1k views

Homogenous versus Homogeneous

I've always used the word (spelling) homogenous to describe things of similar nature. However, when I started university I heard everyone use the word homogeneous (pronounced "homo genius" or "homo ...
3
votes
4answers
712 views

Can you be sent on a quest or does it then become a mission?

A discussion on the Arqade sister site brought up an interesting question that I thought I'd share here. What is the difference between a quest and a mission? Given the roots of the words, quest ...
-3
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0answers
51 views

Is it right to say “that and all…”? [on hold]

My many friends are using “that and all”. For example (context):  I was talking to my coworker about our project.  He has been assigned to do some part, and he is doing it.  But some of the ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Context in the use of 'neither'

I saw this in one of my newsletters: Neither Barack Obama's nor Hillary Clinton's top adviser is Iranian: they're both American citizens by birth. Is that part that says, 'top adviser is Iranian' ...
0
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0answers
8 views

Trained at vs trained to?

The following is a quote from Dragonsbane, by Barbara Hambly, chapter 1. “John would never have gone after the dragon, Gareth, had he not been forced to it. But as Thane of Alyn Hold, as Lord of Wyr, ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

“eldest” vs. “firstborn”

A family genealogist discovered that his grandparent who was believed to have had six siblings actually had two more who had died very young; one died a few days after birth. The firstborn died at ...
2
votes
3answers
902 views

Difference between eloquent and articulate

Is there an intended difference between the words "eloquent" and "articulate," or are they simply two synonymous adjectives? When I use the adjective "eloquent" I most often think of flowery, ...
8
votes
3answers
942 views

What does ‘be one’s “buddy”’ mean aside 'be one’s “friend”'?

What does ‘be one’s “buddy”’ mean aside be one’s “friend”? I was drawn to the phrase, “My short game’s always been my buddy” appearing in the following quote of Tiger Woods in the Time magazine’s (...
-1
votes
1answer
33 views

the difference meaning between humiliate and ridicule [on hold]

i get new word, ridicule, that means making fun of someone in harsh way how about humiliate. i think there both have similiarity but there both not a synonym. what is the difference ? thanks
2
votes
1answer
8k views

Is “play chess when others are playing checkers,” a well-known / well-used phrase?

I found the phrase, “he’s always playing chess when others are playing checkers,” in today’s (September 11) article of New York Times, written by Charles Blow under the headline of “It’s a Mad, Mad, ...
2
votes
2answers
85 views

I dislike his/him being blunt [on hold]

What is the difference between the two sentences below? Are they both grammatically correct? I dislike his being blunt. I dislike him being blunt.
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Why is “positive” chosen as the opposite of “normative”, as in “positive statement”?

I understand that the phrase "positive statement" means, when opposed to normative statement (like in economics), statements that describe facts without indicating (dis)approval, thus that are ...
2
votes
2answers
641 views

Origin of “off the meter” idiomatic phrase

When and how did the phrase "off the meter" become established as an idiom? Urban Dictionary defines "off the meter" as the condition of being "very good, awesome, great". I have heard and said it ...
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0answers
28 views

what is the use of these words; would, should, could? [on hold]

I want to know the usage following; Would Should Could please answer me
1
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0answers
54 views

“Come this May, I will…” Why am I using “come”? [duplicate]

"Come this fall, I will be at Harvard studying law." "Come May, I will have been studying Biology for seven years." While speaking with a colleague, I used the phrase "Come + time period". She wasn'...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Is this correct? : “Tenji that was, died in his sisters arms.” (Kind of like 'powers that be') Also is 'have a claim to' correct' or 'hold a claim to'

Full quote for context "I have no claim to life, yet I walk. I have no claim to valor, yet I fight. I have no claim to love, yet I mourn. I am not the dragon, for Tenji Minamoto that was, died in his ...
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0answers
24 views

Wha is the difference between the two cases of preposition use?

I was just reading something that used the phrase He was studying about civil war history. The author probably meant either "He was learning about civil war history" or "He was studying civil ...
2
votes
0answers
44 views

What is the difference between sqq and ff?

What's the difference between sqq. and ff.? The Apocryphal Acts of Paul, Peter, John, Andrew and Thomas by Bernhard Pick has, for example, these 4 references in a row: Hennecke, N ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Should “something, and therefore something” be referred to as singular or plural?

For example, if I have the sentence Due to the improvement of our algorithm, our model, and therefore simulation, becomes more realistic. Should the becomes be instead written as become? Does ...
1
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0answers
46 views

How to modify gerunds when they are objects? [migrated]

A question about gerunds really confuses me: Is it true when gerunds are objects, we can't make them work as nouns? For example, we can't say: "I really enjoy free swimming!" or "My ...
1
vote
1answer
66 views

“Handling of Task 1” or “Handling Task 1”

I am working on my thesis and included is a subsection in which I describe how a part of a class of my program handles the task I have been assigned for the thesis. To give you an idea of what the ...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

France vs. french as an adjective [closed]

Why do media use France as an adjective, instead of French, e.g., the France economy, vs., the french economy? or Canada tourism vs. Canadian tourism?
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Usage of “imperative to [verb]ing”

From what I learned, we could use imperative to [verb]ing, but when I read my book, I see this sentence: An accurate analysis of surveys is imperative to building a good understanding of customer ...
0
votes
5answers
11k views

Trustable or trustworthy?

For a long time I have been using trustworthy as the adjective for of trust. However, I recently heard someone say trustable, and it piqued my interest. Apparently it is a word on Merriam-Webster as ...
2
votes
0answers
43 views

hiccough vs hiccup [duplicate]

I had 12 years of public school, 4 years of college (honors), 4 years of medical school and 3 years of post graduate training. Now I have practiced medicine for 35 years. Last week, someone told me ...
3
votes
1answer
66 views

What is the word with the definition: “One that is modulated”?

If I employ someone, then they are my "employee". If my computer program modulates other computer programs, then they are my computer program's _____.? I can't find any reference to "modulatee" ...
0
votes
3answers
102 views

How do you write “and” in short form?

How do you write "and" in short form like w/o as in "without"?? It's not "&" but some other form. I used to write it but I forgot since I dont live in the US. Please help me remind it. Thanks
3
votes
1answer
120 views

Is the usage “how many ever” correct?

Eg : You may use it how many ever time. I know the sentence can be phrased better but I just wanted to given an example. So my question is, Is "how many ever" a correct usage?
3
votes
2answers
78 views

Super Duper -usage and nuance

I'd like to know how to use the idiom: Super Duper. It seems to be a slang which means great or marvelous. http://www.thefreedictionary.com/superduper But, one of my colleagues sometimes says "I'm ...
8
votes
4answers
606 views

The usage of “banzai”

I started to reread a pretty old mystery of Thomas Harris, “The silence of the lambs,” which I once gave up reading because of difficulty of understanding the narrative studded with technical jargons ...
5
votes
4answers
248 views

'Devon Police is' or 'Devon Police are'—should 'police' be treated as singular or plural? [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? Devon Police is recording incidents or Devon Police are recording incidents
24
votes
3answers
2k views

Why are “slip roads” called that way?

Slip roads are used to allow vehicles to merge in a road whose speed is higher or, conversely, let them leave it safely. This term appears to be British English usage. Here is an example of usage: ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Could Present Perfect Continuous form a grammatical tautology in some sentences?

I have joined a grammar MOOC starting with an introduction to English tenses. One of the practice questions left me confused. The question is as follows: Do these two sentences have similar ...
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votes
0answers
34 views

Electric cars are easier to make our dreams come true than gas fueled cars [closed]

Electric cars are easier to make our dreams come true than gas fueled cars. This sentence does not sound right to me. Can anyone explain why I might think so.
5
votes
1answer
56 views

Is 'folk' a politically correct substitute for 'people'?

Edit: Comments so far have focused on the speech of politicians. While this discussion is interesting, and desired when relevant, I am more concerned with use in activist communities. I believe the ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Why is “everybody” singular?

Why is "Everybody" in the singular? We say "People in Europe are nice". Why, then, do we say "Everybody in Europe is nice"?
5
votes
3answers
86 views

Is there any difference between “I'm sat” and “I'm sitting”?

In BrE, one can apparently use I'm sat here to mean I'm sitting here. This seems to be a relatively modern usage: I had originally thought that this was a regional or dialectical variant and had ...
0
votes
1answer
186 views

As to grammar and idiom, is the following extract correct: “… if you know the man or are him, call …”?

Obviously, my questions refers to the pronoun him. Am I wrong to suppose that the use of the subject case pronoun he instead of him would not improve the previous statement? What about this one: “… if ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

How do you use colons with abbreviations? [closed]

If you are writing a report and have to mention the room number, is it correct to write Room No.:625, Room No. 625, or Room No: 625 The first example just looks wrong to me, whereas the second and ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Using present perfect with “The last casino”

Can I use the present perfect in the following sentence: "The last casino I have been to was in Spain."? Or, do I have to say "The last casino I went to was in Spain"? To explain: With the ...
18
votes
3answers
7k views

“endure” vs “perdure” vs “persist”

All definitions via The Free Dictionary perdure means To last permanently; endure endure is To continue in existence; last persist means To be obstinately repetitious, insistent, ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

What can be the verb to be used for agreement on contarcts?

What can be the best verb to be used for the process the eventually yields contracts? Should I use: Parties should agree on a contract Parties should find on a contract Parties should sign a ...
1
vote
2answers
55 views

“Answers arrive in a piecemeal fashion”

I am being told that this sentence is not in a proper construction: "Answers arrive in a piecemeal fashion." Neither Book Google nor standard Google search yields a single result using quotation ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Origin of “Innocent” to mean “Sexually Inexperienced”

I was thinking about the way "innocent" is often used (in both casual and moderately formal contexts) to mean "sexually inexperienced/oblivious", and came to the conclusion that using the phrase in ...