How and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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2
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0answers
36 views

Can the word “proxy” be used as a preposition?

At the end of a sentence, I want to insert the following (parentheses included): (proxy my parents, of course). E.g., I sent my brother to his room (proxy my parents, of course). But this ...
1
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2answers
56 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
3
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2answers
101 views

British usage: add verb forms of “do” after a conditional

Is it standard British usage to add forms of the verb "Do" after a conditional like "Would"? e.g., If I could, I would do"?
25
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6answers
4k views

What is the difference between Ukraine and the Ukraine?

Time magazine (March 5th) carries the article titled, “Ukraine, not the Ukraine: The significance of three little letters,” in which the following comment of William Taylor, who served as the U.S. ...
2
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1answer
14k views

Is the usage of “so as to” correct? [on hold]

Can "so as to" be used, and if so in what contexts and in what situations? Can it be used formally and in written documents? Edit: I'm looking more at an IT question for example "You can do ...
4
votes
2answers
57 views

“Please, cut the apple in halves.” or “Please, cut it in half.”?

I've heard native speakers use "half" but never "halves" in such sentences. If we cut an apple into two identical pieces, we get two halves. It shouldn't, therefore, sound wrong if one used ...
2
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3answers
341 views

What are the replacements for “i.e.” and what are their differences?

I can think of "that is to say", "in other words", "put differently". And I'd like to know if there are any subtle differences in the usage of these synonyms. Can they always be used interchangeably ...
3
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5answers
36k views

When to use 'ourselves' vs. 'our self'

I wrote when we place our self meaning each one of us, his or her self -- and was told to use "ourselves" instead. Who is right?
12
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6answers
4k views

When did the term “flip flop” displace the term “thong” in North America for a type of sandal?

To Australians like me "thong" means a kind of sandal such as recently repopularized by the Havaianas brand but we know it means a kind of G-string in other English-speaking parts of the world. To ...
0
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2answers
58 views

“Dish of the day“ vs “today's special”

Many restaurants offer a menu which doesn't change from day to day, and in addition offer one choice which varies from day to day, perhaps depending on which ingredients are available. This choice can ...
0
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0answers
24 views

Usage of the phrase 'reviewing over'

I've come across the phrase 'reviewing over' and at first I disregarded it as a hold over from grammar in a foreign language but now I've seen a native English speaker use the same phrase. For ...
0
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1answer
71 views

usage of “constitute” and “thankful”

A senior researcher has single-handed[ly] constituted one of the most comprehensive collections of field recordings. I have three questions, two pertaining to usage and one to grammar:  1. ...
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0answers
45 views

Novels for improving English vocabulary [closed]

I'm learning English and I think my level is between upper intermediate - advanced now and I want to improve my english as well. So I need free download fictions, novels, .... books. I downloaded some ...
5
votes
4answers
5k views

You didn't miss me, right? (possible answer with correct use of English)

A) No, I didn't miss you. B) Yes, I didn't miss you. C) No, I did miss you. D) Yes, I did miss you. According to my common sense perfect answers can be C) and B) only, and reason behind it is- ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
0
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2answers
27 views

how do we use 'ride' and 'drive when it comes to a motorcycle?

suppose Iam offering someone a ride home can i use the word 'ride' as in " come I'll ride you home " i know " I'll give you a ride home " would be the correct sentence but could you still answer my ...
1
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0answers
34 views

Clarification about the usage of “the” [migrated]

I know that this may be a basic question but I'm severely confused. How do you decide when or not to use "the". For what I've read, if you are referring to objects within a large class (without any ...
0
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3answers
60 views

The use of “considered” [on hold]

When using the word "considered," should it typically be followed by "to be" or "as"? For example, The project was considered a failure vs. The project was considered to be a failure I am ...
2
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2answers
33 views

Is the describer needed in 'not…but…" type constructions?

Consider these two sentences: "His actions reveal him to be a husband who is not jealous but is zealous." "Those words demonstrate not his jealousness but his zealousness." Are the words ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

“Rather !” as a reply: old-fashioned? Colloquial? Unusual?

Is "Rather" as a reply (BrE), with heavy stress on the second syllable, old-fashioned ? Colloquial ? Unusual ? e.g. "Did you enjoy yourself?" "Rather!" Can "pretty much so!" be its AmE ...
1
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3answers
42 views

When should we expect an answer

What is the proper way to ask this question? When should we expect an answer or When can we expect an answer
53
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8answers
4k views

“My personal opinion is…” Is it always pointless to use the words “personal” and “personally”?

Is this kind of redundancy acceptable in both speech and writing, formal and informal ? Would the following sentences have their meaning changed if we omitted "personal" or "personally" ? Would they ...
0
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3answers
95 views

How come “wise man” and “wise guy” have opposite connotations?

wise man: a sage a wise and trusted guide and advisor wise guy: a smart aleck a person who is given to making conceited, sardonic, or insolent comments ...
0
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2answers
42 views

Confused on how to use “instead” in the middle of a sentence

I am dumbfounded on why the man does not spring for Walton’s help, instead, he makes sure the vessel is headed North. I'm confused on how to use "instead" in the middle of my sentence. Is that ...
0
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2answers
44 views

Sudden popularity of: obfuscate, why? [closed]

I hope there is a real reason for this and that my question won't be seen as 'primarily opinion based'. What's the deal with the sudden popularity of the word 'obfuscate' and it's variants? Ngram ...
0
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0answers
7 views

Meaning of “Updated As Reported” [migrated]

I have a question about this example: link (move mouse over the blue question mark) Choose the ID that matches the office you want to visit. This information is reported by the doctor ...
0
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0answers
5 views

Proper use of the word equipment in the following sentance [migrated]

Which sentance is correct: The equipment used for both boats is simular? The equipment used for both boats are simular?
13
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5answers
1k views

History and usage of “dooryard”

I have been interested in the expression "dooryard stop" recently. This is an expression that is used to describe a short visit in someone's dooryard (driveway) that often means not staying long ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

Can all verbs ending in “-ise” be written with the suffix “ize”? [closed]

Are there any "-ise" (or "-yse") words which cannot be (or are never) written using "-ize"? I searched for prior questions, and came across: Correct use of "ise" vs "ize" at the ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Why are names considered proper nouns?

Names are supposed to be proper nouns because they refer to a unique entity, right? But what about when the condition of specificity is not applicable? Take the word "Albert". It's supposed to be a ...
0
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0answers
42 views

He didn't so much as thank me OR to thank me?

I have heard both ways 'He didn't so much as thank me' and 'He didn't so much as to thank me'. Which is correct and is the other wrong or can it be used colloquially? Thank you.
4
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7answers
585 views

Is it redundant to say that something is “clearly evident”?

Here's a sentence: "The volume of resources invested is clearly evident." Is this redundant?
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0answers
29 views

Usage or abusage? [duplicate]

English is not my first language. I live, and work, among people who do not have English as their first language. I notice many instances where grammar has been abused. Sometimes, I am not sure ...
0
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1answer
47 views

Legitimacy of the usage of “homeworks” [duplicate]

Teachers and students sometimes refer to homework assignments as "homeworks". Is that an acceptable usage?
0
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1answer
44 views

Can we use “bad” as an adverb in writing and formal speech? [duplicate]

Should a lecturer say "He felt bad" or "He felt badly"? "His tooth ached so bad he couldn't sleep" or "His tooth ached so badly he couldn't sleep"? Are both forms acceptable in formal ...
1
vote
6answers
120 views

Proper usage of “trying”

Let's say there is an atmospheric condition where the water in a bucket partially freezes then reverts back to a completely liquid state and vacillates back and forth but never actually freezes. Is ...
0
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0answers
12 views

Usage of I or me [duplicate]

The use of me and I what it the secret to this struggle. When is it appropriate to use me and when to use I?
4
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2answers
119 views

What led to the increased usage of “schtupping”?

I was listening to a television show the other day and one of the characters used "schtupping": schtupping — to have sexual intercourse with Dictionary.com notes that the term's origin is ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

“exact soluble model” or “exact solvable model”, “analytic” or “analytical” solutions

In physical science and math, we encounter some models that can be analytically solved. This means that the properties of models are fully understood and determined by the analytical solutions. In ...
3
votes
1answer
310 views

“Home appliances”, “household appliances”, “domestic appliances”, and “brown/white wares” in AE

In AE, do the terms "home appliances", "household appliances", and "domestic appliances" mean just about the same, or is there a subtle difference to these? You might want to consider this Ngram for ...
1
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2answers
380 views

Using besides in a sentence

Besides gaining my career, the course will surely contribute to our country’s wealth. Is this use of besides correct?
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0answers
43 views

About the usage of the word “gravity” in speech

From John Hancock's "On the Boston Massacre", a speech delivered in March 5, 1774, he used the expression "The attentive gravity, the venerable appearance of this crowded audience..." I understand ...
-1
votes
4answers
112 views

Does the verb “trounce” have dual meanings of active and passive voice in its gerund form,”trouncing”?

There was the following sentence in Time magazine (June 28) article titled, “Reform in Japan – The third arrow” analyzing Japan’s Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe’s so called, Abenomix policies to ...
0
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0answers
5 views

Usage of “If any” [migrated]

I have seen this pair of words several times and could roughly catch the meanings in the contexts encountered. However, I do not understand properly and hence can't use it. What does 'if any' really ...
0
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1answer
81 views

What two words best describe these features?

I am in the middle of developing an app. I'm having some trouble trying to decide the best usage for two features in particular. I know what both of these words mean, but I am becoming increasingly ...
5
votes
4answers
362 views

How often is “more often than not”?

A person, supposedly a native speaker of English, assured me that I would say "often" means roughly 50-60% of the time, whereas "more often than not" means 75-95% of the time, and is closer in ...
3
votes
2answers
201 views

When did “by way of” start meaning “originally from”

Some years ago, after returning to New York from some years living abroad, I began to notice New Yorkers of a certain generation (in their 20s and early 30s) describing themselves or others as "from ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Usage of “Only when X will Y and then only when Z” [closed]

This sentence: Only when input goes to logic 1 (s) will the FSM move from state s0 to s1, and then only when a clock pulse arrives. I have read in a book related to digital logic. I know the ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

Using future simple tense in a thesis

Being a non-native speaker, I have of course a bit of a problem with writing my thesis in English. In the thesis, I propose a software solution and I describe it. What I am not sure is: should I use ...
6
votes
2answers
177 views

What Defines a Utah Accent?

I have heard a number of people refer to the "Utah accent." What is it that distinguishes a Utah accent from others? I have noticed that, in some cases, people from Utah omit the 't' from words such ...