How and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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1answer
45 views

Vocabularies about order of the things

I want to know if what certain orders or positions in the orders are in English. The following are my questions, assume that we have ten apples, I put my questions on these apples: What is the name ...
2
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2answers
76 views

What is the definition of definition?

Does a definition need to provide a unique or near-unique description or can non-unique descriptions also be categorized as definitions? For example: Is the statement "An apple is a fruit" a ...
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1answer
27 views

the usage of “insalubrious”

Does it make sense to say an insalubrious relationship between two countries? If not, what would be a better replacement? hey this is my first post on this website.. I'm a non-native english ...
29
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6answers
6k views

What is the difference between Ukraine and the Ukraine?

Time magazine (March 5th) carries the article titled, “Ukraine, not the Ukraine: The significance of three little letters,” in which the following comment of William Taylor, who served as the U.S. ...
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2answers
130 views

find something gone or find something has gone

Are both of them right? Next morning when you wake up, you find your kidney has gone. Next morning when you wake up, you find your kidney gone. If they are all right, what's the difference?
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1answer
71 views

Adjective form of “degrade”?

For example, I want to say: This book degrades Western culture. In this form: This book has been described as ??? to Western culture. What would the adjective form be? Is "degradeful" a ...
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1answer
102 views

Why We Need To Know About Hyperboles [closed]

So I realize that hyperboles exist, but in school we're taught about them as if they are truly important to what we are going to be doing in life. I realize their usefulness, but why do we need to ...
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3answers
660 views

“fought in the World War II” versus “fought in the second World War” [closed]

Why is fought in the second World War or fought in the Vietnam War correct but fought in the World War II is not?
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2answers
152 views

British usage: add verb forms of “do” after a conditional

Is it standard British usage to add forms of the verb "Do" after a conditional like "Would"? e.g., If I could, I would do"?
2
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1answer
28k views

Is the usage of “so as to” correct? [closed]

Can "so as to" be used, and if so in what contexts and in what situations? Can it be used formally and in written documents? Edit: I'm looking more at an IT question for example "You can do ...
4
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2answers
527 views

“Please, cut the apple in halves.” or “Please, cut it in half.”?

I've heard native speakers use "half" but never "halves" in such sentences. If we cut an apple into two identical pieces, we get two halves. It shouldn't, therefore, sound wrong if one used ...
2
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3answers
501 views

What are the replacements for “i.e.” and what are their differences?

I can think of "that is to say", "in other words", "put differently". And I'd like to know if there are any subtle differences in the usage of these synonyms. Can they always be used interchangeably ...
3
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5answers
59k views

When to use 'ourselves' vs. 'our self'

I wrote when we place our self meaning each one of us, his or her self -- and was told to use "ourselves" instead. Who is right?
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4answers
8k views

You didn't miss me, right? (possible answer with correct use of English)

A) No, I didn't miss you. B) Yes, I didn't miss you. C) No, I did miss you. D) Yes, I did miss you. According to my common sense perfect answers can be C) and B) only, and reason behind it is- ...
1
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1answer
71 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
2
votes
1answer
102 views

“Rather !” as a reply: old-fashioned? Colloquial? Unusual?

Is "Rather" as a reply (BrE), with heavy stress on the second syllable, old-fashioned ? Colloquial ? Unusual ? e.g. "Did you enjoy yourself?" "Rather!" Can "pretty much so!" be its AmE ...
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3answers
582 views

When should we expect an answer

What is the proper way to ask this question? When should we expect an answer or When can we expect an answer
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2answers
59 views

Sudden popularity of: obfuscate, why? [closed]

I hope there is a real reason for this and that my question won't be seen as 'primarily opinion based'. What's the deal with the sudden popularity of the word 'obfuscate' and it's variants? Ngram ...
1
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1answer
363 views

Can all verbs ending in “-ise” be written with the suffix “ize”? [closed]

Are there any "-ise" (or "-yse") words which cannot be (or are never) written using "-ize"? I searched for prior questions, and came across: Correct use of "ise" vs "ize" at the ...
2
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1answer
194 views

Why are names considered proper nouns?

Names are supposed to be proper nouns because they refer to a unique entity, right? But what about when the condition of specificity is not applicable? Take the word "Albert". It's supposed to be a ...
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7answers
1k views

Is it redundant to say that something is “clearly evident”?

Here's a sentence: "The volume of resources invested is clearly evident." Is this redundant?
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0answers
29 views

Usage or abusage? [duplicate]

English is not my first language. I live, and work, among people who do not have English as their first language. I notice many instances where grammar has been abused. Sometimes, I am not sure ...
0
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1answer
63 views

Legitimacy of the usage of “homeworks” [duplicate]

Teachers and students sometimes refer to homework assignments as "homeworks". Is that an acceptable usage?
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1answer
220 views

Can we use “bad” as an adverb in writing and formal speech? [duplicate]

Should a lecturer say "He felt bad" or "He felt badly"? "His tooth ached so bad he couldn't sleep" or "His tooth ached so badly he couldn't sleep"? Are both forms acceptable in formal ...
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6answers
151 views

Proper usage of “trying”

Let's say there is an atmospheric condition where the water in a bucket partially freezes then reverts back to a completely liquid state and vacillates back and forth but never actually freezes. Is ...
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0answers
13 views

Usage of I or me [duplicate]

The use of me and I what it the secret to this struggle. When is it appropriate to use me and when to use I?
2
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1answer
212 views

“exact soluble model” or “exact solvable model”, “analytic” or “analytical” solutions

In physical science and math, we encounter some models that can be analytically solved. This means that the properties of models are fully understood and determined by the analytical solutions. In ...
3
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1answer
434 views

“Home appliances”, “household appliances”, “domestic appliances”, and “brown/white wares” in AE

In AE, do the terms "home appliances", "household appliances", and "domestic appliances" mean just about the same, or is there a subtle difference to these? You might want to consider this Ngram for ...
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2answers
669 views

Using besides in a sentence

Besides gaining my career, the course will surely contribute to our country’s wealth. Is this use of besides correct?
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4answers
168 views

Does the verb “trounce” have dual meanings of active and passive voice in its gerund form,”trouncing”?

There was the following sentence in Time magazine (June 28) article titled, “Reform in Japan – The third arrow” analyzing Japan’s Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe’s so called, Abenomix policies to ...
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2answers
1k views

When did “by way of” start meaning “originally from”

Some years ago, after returning to New York from some years living abroad, I began to notice New Yorkers of a certain generation (in their 20s and early 30s) describing themselves or others as "from ...
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1answer
134 views

Usage of “Only when X will Y and then only when Z” [closed]

This sentence: Only when input goes to logic 1 (s) will the FSM move from state s0 to s1, and then only when a clock pulse arrives. I have read in a book related to digital logic. I know the ...
1
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2answers
104 views

Using future simple tense in a thesis

Being a non-native speaker, I have of course a bit of a problem with writing my thesis in English. In the thesis, I propose a software solution and I describe it. What I am not sure is: should I use ...
6
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2answers
999 views

What Defines a Utah Accent?

I have heard a number of people refer to the "Utah accent." What is it that distinguishes a Utah accent from others? I have noticed that, in some cases, people from Utah omit the 't' from words such ...
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2answers
99 views

Is 'Loneliness is profound on weekends' correct? [closed]

Profound being an adjective, is its usage in the sentence below correct? Loneliness is profound on weekends.
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0answers
20 views

Which should I use? That or which? [duplicate]

I am confused on the usage of "that" and "which". Would using "that" on both clauses of the following sentence be correct? Which ones should I use instead if it's not? "Why did you eat the pie that ...
4
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1answer
137 views

What principle guides word combinations with “almost”?

I am trying to explain to non-native speakers how to use "almost." I can't formulate (a) rule(s) to follow with regard to nouns/pronouns. So far, my only ideas are that almost can be collocated only ...
3
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6answers
2k views

Usage of “ladies and gentlemen” to address two people of diiferent sex

It seems to be not quite logical to use the traditional address "ladies and gentlemen" when there are only a single lady and a single gentleman in the room, not counting for the person who is ...
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2answers
165 views

Can the verb 'judge' collocate with 'of'? [closed]

I saw this sentence in an essay: Children’s cognitive development is on the preoperational stage, so they cannot consider as logical and judge of dangerous events. I would say "judge sth" or ...
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1answer
4k views

what does “early next week” means when said on Sunday?

I just received an email from my boss on Sunday afternoon saying that "please submit your work early next week". Does this mean the Monday or Tuesday of the coming week or the Monday or Tuesday of the ...
0
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1answer
88 views

Is “two-thirds” or “two thirds” correct? [duplicate]

I just recently answered a question related to how much water was filled in a glass. I answered "two thirds" but the answer was wrong because in the key answer book it was "two-thirds". Please tell me ...
2
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1answer
193 views
1
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4answers
99 views

What does “a bookstore-counting mood in Paris prompts soul-searching over Amazon’s 41 % share of new book sales in America” mean?

In the article titled “The French do buy books. Real books” appearing in New York Times (July 9), the author, Pamela Druckerman writes: “Recently when I was strolling through my museum-like ...
0
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1answer
107 views

How to use the word “restriction”

I am not sure about the usage of the word “restriction”. I would like to use it in a sentence like: “This video has some distribution and/or age restrictions”. Can I use “has some” or is there a ...
0
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3answers
2k views

To Be Used Of/For

Does "to be used OF" mean "to be used FOR": wikipedia The English term "empiric" derives from the Greek word ἐμπειρία, which is cognate with and translates to the Latin experientia, from which ...
2
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1answer
249 views

Dependent clause after pronoun

This question arose from why sentence #1 is correct and why sentence #2 is incorrect - I pity those who lost their money in gambling. I pity them who lost their money in gambling. I have ...
0
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1answer
65 views

Is “help out” an inappropriate phrase? [closed]

I have seen statements like: She helped out her grandmother. OR The boy was helping out in the laundry. But, does it make any sense to have the “out” there? Is it even incorrect, in spite ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

More Than One “from” in a Single Phrase

I apologize if this has already been raised elsewhere. I was unable to find an answer to the question of when, if ever, it is acceptable form to include multiple uses of the word "from" in a single ...
0
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2answers
258 views

Should we avoid a “double passive”?

Does it sound strange to say "An emergency meeting is expected to be held soon." or "The new highway is proposed to be built across the swamp." Should we avoid this type of construction ?
1
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1answer
345 views

Antonym of heartbreaker? [closed]

In one of my short stories, I have to compare a guy who is a heartbreaker to someone who is exactly the opposite of him. Instead of describing the opposite character of the guy, I am looking for a ...