For questions on how and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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1answer
67 views

Should “something, and therefore something” be referred to as singular or plural?

For example, if I have the sentence Due to the improvement of our algorithm, our model, and therefore simulation, becomes more realistic. Should the becomes be instead written as become? Does ...
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1answer
3k views

“Yes, Please” vs “Yes, Of course”

I have heard people saying: Que: Can I use your pen? Ans: Yes please. and also Que: Can I use your pen? Ans: Yes Of course. I wanted to know if there is any difference between these two ...
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2answers
49 views

Renown vs. renowned [closed]

Which is correct? 'The event will be held in the renown abbey' OR 'the event will be held in the renowned abbey' ?
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1answer
141 views

Usage of “imperative to [verb]ing”

From what I learned, we could use imperative to [verb]ing, but when I read my book, I see this sentence: An accurate analysis of surveys is imperative to building a good understanding of customer ...
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3answers
77 views

In “Dear X” what function does “X” serve?

I answered a question (Should I use capital or small letter here? "Dear All" or "Dear all"?) about capitalizing "all" in "Dear All," In answering this, my thinking was "what ...
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1answer
90 views

Has the expression “powered by”, as used in website or softwares, a positive connotation?

This question is a spin-off of this one in Portuguese SE. In that question, the OP wanted to know how to translate to Portuguese the expression powered by as used in websites or softwares when another ...
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4answers
235 views

Understanding dichotomy [closed]

I am having a hard time understanding the definition of dichotomy. I saw this recent article from a Harvard student: "• Dichotomy means two mutually exclusive alternatives and does not mean ...
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1answer
143 views

English of Modern Technology [closed]

English is a dynamic, fast evolving language. Many new technological terms and expressions have been recently added to the language. My question is where to find good resources (books, forums, etc) to ...
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1answer
154 views

Which is correct: 'leaving at…' or 'leaving by…', '..end of this week'?

My understanding of correct usage is 'leaving by end of this week', and that is what I have been using all along. However looking at an example of 'informal letter', at an IELTS preparation site, I ...
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1answer
62 views

Remove extra “the”s and improve a sentence [closed]

I have the following statement describing a course learning outcome: At the end of this course, the students will be able to: Apply concepts of lighting and illumination technology and ...
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3answers
96 views

Usage of “cooperate.” [closed]

Almost all of my students use the word "cooperate" in this way: "My company cooperates with X." X can be a company or person. For example, if the student works at MediaTek, they will say "We ...
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0answers
194 views

How to ask a question about ordinal number? [duplicate]

There are many pupils in the classroom. Peter was the n th( n is a positive integer) student to arrive. Now I want to ask Peter about what n is. How can I ask him? It seems that it is very difficult ...
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1answer
62 views

Colloquial for House of Commons

In the United Kingdom, what is colloquial for House of Commons? Would you say a member addressed the House, addressed Commons, or would you also say he or she addressed the House of Commons?
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1answer
720 views

Interview, taking, giving, being interviewed

So what is correct to use in the context of the interview? (If one is an interviewee) I am taking an interview. I am giving an interview. I am being interviewed. (If one is an interviewer) I am ...
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0answers
14 views

Usage of a pronoun properly [duplicate]

I had this question in mind for long and I think this is the perfect spot to ask. Consider the following sentences (Just for instance). We are an equal opportunity employer. However when applying ...
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1answer
107 views

Is “have to” appropriate in formal writing [closed]

Is it appropriate to use have to in formal writing? I've seen a number of posts about the meaning of that phrase but none regarding whether it is appropriate compared to alternatives. EDIT: Here's ...
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2answers
147 views

Is “Me” instead of “I” as a nominative pronoun actually acceptable?

TL;DR; Has 'Me and whoever' long become acceptable usage in informal speech? In the comments on this answer on ELL, I corrected the usage of "me" instead of "I". "My boyfriend and I.. " 😁 ...
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3answers
2k views

1 o'clock in the morning OR 1 o'clock at night?

Could you help me on this? In my native language I would speak about the "night" starting from around 11 pm till 4 in the morning. So every time I see an English phrase like "2 o'clock in the morning" ...
2
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1answer
157 views

Why “off the table” is not included in major English dictionaries while “on the table” is shown as an idiom in all of them?

I recently saw a cartoon in which President Obama in a physician’s costume followed by an elephant and a buffalo in suit is lifting up the one end of a surgery tolley marked “Big farma and insurance ...
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2answers
238 views

“Experimented person” as synonym of “Experienced person”

I occasionally find some occurrences of experimented as adjective, such as experimented user, experimented soldier, etc., but they are relatively rare. Is is accepted usage to consider both words as ...
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1answer
181 views

Is there a difference between “entrée” and “entry”?

From a recent op-ed in the Washington Post (emphasis mine): But immigration gives Trump entrée to African Americans with an issue that will resonate with many and at least give him a hearing. I ...
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3answers
101 views

I'm looking for a word similar to an abstract concept

I'm looking for a word to describe when you are aware that something is real, however because you've never experienced said-thing firsthand, the thought of the thing seems like an abstract concept ...
0
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1answer
181 views

Can we use “depart” in the following sentence?

Can we use "depart" in the following sentence? I departed from Jared, heading to the north as he went to the opposite direction. I guess "depart" is mostly used for places. I wonder if it can be ...
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2answers
583 views

Is there any difference or nuance between “At the start, …” and “In the beginning, …”?

"At the start, ...", this is from the book, I am reading now. It sounded very rare to me so I was wondering what an occasion I can use this expression comparing "In the beginning, ...". Thanks.
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1answer
57 views

“eldest” vs. “firstborn”

A family genealogist discovered that his grandparent who was believed to have had six siblings actually had two more who had died very young; one died a few days after birth. The firstborn died at ...
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1answer
58 views

Use of “workarounds”

Let's say there is problem X, and I have in mind some methods, each is a workaround for X. For a single workaround, it seems fine to say: "I am suggesting a workaround X", but I feel the following ...
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1answer
85 views

Can't understand a 'but' word usage [Daniel Defoe] [closed]

Can someone please explain me why Daniel Defoe uses a 'but' word literally everywhere? (See photos, last string in both occasions). Thanks a lot for your answers!
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1answer
154 views

How do I choose between “was” and “were”? [closed]

Should I use the singular “was” or the plural “were” in the following sentence? The first thing that I noticed was (OR) were the street performers singing near the main entrance of the park. ...
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1answer
71 views

When did it become common to say “because X” instead of “because of X?” [duplicate]

When did this usage become common, especially in a sarcastic or ironic context? Carnegie Mellon erroneously sends computer science admission letters to 800, because computers. [emphasis added] ...
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3answers
232 views

Can the word petrify be used correctly in the sentences below? [closed]

Can the word petrify be used correctly in the sentences below? He was petrified with exhaustion! He was so petrified he slept without moving a muscle.
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4answers
4k views

What is meant by a “two-lane” road?

When people say that a road has "two lanes"? Two lanes total, one travelling in one direction, and one travelling in the opposite direction? Two lanes travelling in one direction, and two more ...
32
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7answers
2k views

Can a statement be “hissed” without any sibilants?

Is using hissed as a replacement for said technically acceptable in dialogue without the presence of any sibilants? "You fool!" she hissed. I understand that hissed could be used to indicate a ...
0
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1answer
68 views

Usage of “so to” in the place of “to” as part of infinitive construction

Example: We make wine by hand in small lots and taste the wines constantly so to profit from its constant change. I would normally drop the "so" and phrase it like "we do it to profit" Are both ...
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1answer
43 views

Use of 'such as themselves'?

Would it be correct to use the following sentence? The group make for a handsome lot. And that poise of talk can only be found in the most opulent of beings, such as themselves. I have been ...
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1answer
97 views

Are proper adverbs falling out of usage in current spoken American English?

While watching American movies and TV series, I notice that in dialogue very often the usage of a proper adverb is replaced by the corresponding adjective (in the case where the adverb is formed by ...
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6answers
3k views

The meaning of 0% and 100% as opposed to other percentages?

Oftentimes, percentages are rounded to the nearest whole number. A $49.99 item may be marked 50% off, even if the price becomes $24.99 (it should be 50.03% off). However, I have come to notice that ...
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2answers
35 views

What is the difference between “feudal” and “feudalistic”?

They are both adjectives related to feudalism. But what is the difference between the two in actual usage.
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1answer
104 views

Regional omission of “to be.” [duplicate]

I've noticed that people from the Washington, Oregon area tend to omit "to be" when describing something that needs to be completed. For example, just today one of my consulting engineers sent me an ...
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5answers
457 views

For computer science, are the files corrupted or corrupt?

Computer files: Are they "corrupt" or "corrupted"? I feel they could be both. What is the standard?
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2answers
40 views

The second verb of subject should be express according to number or not? [closed]

He is a man who has a bad heart. or He is a man who have a bad heart. Which one is correct? I tried to search "He is a man who have" and "He is a man who has" on Google but I got quite ...
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1answer
36 views

Using “Chances are…”

Here's the sentence I'm wrestling with: "Chances are most of your customers are..." Is this correct? Or should it be "Chances are that most of your customers..." or "Chances are, most of your ...
2
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3answers
132 views

What is the meaning of this life quote? [closed]

I am trying (but failing) to understand the meaning of this life quote: Trying is a part of failing. If you are afraid to fail then you are afraid to try. Can you explain what it means?
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0answers
129 views

Does an invitation to do something “together” imply “with a group”?

I need to know the meaning of the following sentence, if being sent to one person. "Would you be interested in trying out a new restaurant together sometime"? Does this mean that this is a group ...
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2answers
326 views

“Looks like” in more formal way [closed]

I want to write It looks like I misunderstood Berta's explanation But in more formal way. Thanks
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2answers
149 views

“…the city of Berlin was divided ________ the USSR, the USA and the UK” [duplicate]

After the second world war, the city of Berlin was divided ________ the USSR, the USA and the UK. Options by with between among My Approach: I am not able to solve this ...
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2answers
61 views

Why the word “common ground” as noun does not contain or unnecessary to have a hyphen?

Why the word "common ground" as noun does not contain or unnecessary to have a hyphen? Is this compound term correct?
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1answer
59 views

In anything but…meaning and usage

I am reading some documentation and cannot fully understand the meaning of 'In anything but..' In anything but the smallest applications it makes sense to organize the service definitions by ...
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3answers
263 views

Which is correct, “to take refuge in” or “to take refuge with”?

Concerning refuge with a higher existence such as an Omnipotent being, what is more befitting to use, English wise: To take refuge in [Omnipotent being] To take refuge with [Omnipotent being] ...
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1answer
3k views

Can we say “same to you” in response to “nice to meet you”?

Is it ok to respond with "same to you" when someone says Nice to meet you ? I am getting confused because "you too" can be interchangeably used for "same to you".
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1answer
102 views

Long-term v lifelong [closed]

Should I say "It's been a long-term dream of mine to do sth" or "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to do sth"