How and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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1answer
1k views

Can we say “same to you” in response to “nice to meet you”?

Is it ok to respond with "same to you" when someone says Nice to meet you ? I am getting confused because "you too" can be interchangeably used for "same to you".
0
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1answer
73 views

Long-term v lifelong [closed]

Should I say "It's been a long-term dream of mine to do sth" or "It's been a lifelong dream of mine to do sth"
0
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1answer
138 views

Which future tense for holidays or doctor appointments?

Although I know the general rules when to apply which tense, I'm often confused and do not really know which one to use. I can find pros and cons for each tense. Two examples: In terms of spending ...
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4answers
105 views

Use of “this was suggested to me by…”

I say to my friend Mark: "You should read this book". Later, Mark talks with another person about this and says: "This book was suggested to me by a friend". Is this correct? Does it sound natural or ...
4
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1answer
113 views

Why does this use of “the” seem wrong?

I'm helping a colleague edit his paper before submission. He is a native French speaker and I am having trouble saying why "the" isn't necessary in "the threads" or in particular "the shared memory," ...
2
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3answers
123 views

How I can use a word of “whereas”?

I looked up Oxford dictionary: In contrast or comparison with the fact that: "you treat the matter lightly, whereas I myself was never more serious" I am still confusing about this meaning. Please ...
3
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1answer
137 views

19th C forms of address

In the early 19th C. when the eldest daughter married, did the second oldest daughter become the "Miss Whatever," or did she continue to be identified as "Miss Whoever Whatever?'
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5answers
797 views

Does “Smugness” imply “Having or showing low opinions of others”?

I have a little confusion whether "smugness" implies a "low opinion of others" in contrast to a "high opinion of oneself" I have consulted ODO and wiktionary; they showed the meaning of "Smugness" is ...
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3answers
55 views

Can we use this expression [closed]

Is this OK to use the following: Looking into the photograph the girl said, "It's me before 5 years."
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1answer
58 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? [closed]

We had our nails done at a salon and afterwards we went to a cafe, where Julie had an indulgent hot chocolate and I had a pot of tea. Please explain your answer. Thanks.
2
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1answer
145 views

Is “should” appropriate for polite requests?

I am placing request to a customer for a project and I want him to provide some information. I had worked with them in a previous assignment and they failed to provide me most of the details ...
4
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6answers
270 views

Can “weren't” be used in reference to a singular noun?

I've been watching a TV sitcom lately, "Last Tango in Halifax." A main character uses "weren't" instead of "wasn't" and I am wondering if that is considered correct in some areas or dialects? For ...
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1answer
50 views

What is the usage of word “like” here?

Indian elephants are the main contributors to the biogas production, but other vegetarian animals, like giraffes and rhinoceroses, help as well. What is the name of usage of this word "like" ...
0
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2answers
463 views

“use some rest” vs. “take some rest” vs. “get some rest”?

use some rest take some rest get some rest Which one is correct if I want to tell my friend to go to relax or take a nap? The phrase "take some rest" is familiar me but I also have ...
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0answers
51 views

Is “Jap” more commonly used in media with space restrictions?

From time to time, I encounter people using the word "Jap" on Twitter. One explanation I've seen for its use is that it's shorter than "Japanese" or "Japan", so it's easier to write tweets that fit ...
1
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1answer
98 views

What is the difference between “acquisitional”, “acquisitive”, and “acquisitory”?

I am actually a native speaker, but this one threw me. "Acquisitory" seems to be associated with avarice/greed, possibly specifically for material goods. "Acquisitive" also seems to be related to ...
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0answers
67 views

Grammatical rule for using no article with nouns

I can use "Listing Activation Codes" in an article whose description is the following: Use the following API route to list activation codes and their values. ​In this description, I mean that ...
2
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0answers
86 views

Why is the word “fewer” seemingly doomed? [closed]

More and more I see the word "fewer" less and less. It's being replaced by "less" and seemingly falling into disuse. What is the reason for this? Is it as simple as the marketeers believing, "fewer ...
4
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1answer
82 views

“Double Clicking” to mean, going in depth

I have been recently hearing the expression "double clicking" to mean 'going in depth'. For example: We will double click on this topic later on when required. I have never heard of such a usage ...
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3answers
113 views

What does “for comfort” in “too fast (close / hot/ warm / crammed) for comfort” mean?

I was drawn to the phrase, “Too fast for comfort” in New York Times (August 10) article with a headline, “China devalues its currency amid economic slowdown.: The move appeared to be a response to ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Does “money laundering” also mean raising funds illegally?

When I looked up what money laundering meant, the dictionary said it meant “concealing proceeds raised from illegitimate sources”. Does money laundering also mean “raising funds illegally”? If not, ...
0
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1answer
108 views

Does 'I certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism' make sense?

I recently watched an interview with a terrible journalist and she said the line: I certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism I'm specifically interested in doing good ...
0
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2answers
131 views

What does “Failure to fail” mean?

Paul Krugman, economist and Op-ed columnist of New York Times wrote in his article under the title, “G.O.P. Candidates and Obama’s failure to fail" - August 10. The shared premise of everyone on ...
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3answers
472 views

Preposition in vs. of

Which is correct; "in" poverty or "of" poverty? The children have survived 10 years of poverty. or The children have survived 10 years in poverty. Thank you!
3
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1answer
660 views

Why did Mother Teresa use the phrase “it is a poverty”?

I frequently see bumper stickers with quotations attributed to Mother Teresa that begin with the words "It is a poverty," for example: It is a poverty to decide that a child must die so that ...
0
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1answer
119 views

Meaning of “on the wax” from an article in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

I do not follow the meaning of "on the wax" below, and do not find its usage in any online dictionary. Yet the original text appears in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, thus peer-reviewed. So I ...
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2answers
388 views

What does “work a rope line” mean?

When Presidential race and caucuses are close, the candidates seem to be busy in “working a lope line” as in the following examples:. Wolf needs to work on his rope line speed. - ...
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1answer
1k views

Proactive vs Preemptive [closed]

I need to explain the difference between "proactive" and "preemptive" and come up with a sample of the proper context of each word. Can someone point me to a previous post or give me their thoughts?
3
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3answers
4k views

Meaning of “Conceptual point of view”

Now and then, I here this: From the conceptual point of view ... However, I still can't get its meaning. I think it is somehow related to the way to think about a particular subject, but I'm not ...
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2answers
220 views

usage of “Since the last X years”

Is this correct? "Since the last X years, Y is being used as ...". Meaning that Y has been used during the last X years, but also that it has been used for the first time only X years ago. this ...
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3answers
2k views

Why is it correct to say “He came and said something to me” but not “He came and said to me something”?

This question was just posed to me and I couldn't give a clear answer beyond that the second just feels wrong and one would generally use a direct or indirect quotation, as in "he came and said to me ...
4
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2answers
405 views

What is the difference between “could've” and “could of”? [duplicate]

I have seen people using could of instead of could have. Are both of them correct? Is there a difference in meaning between them?
0
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1answer
120 views

is “over the past years” a natural sounding expression?

I have heard "over the past few years" or "over past years", but I just read a document that said "X, Y and Z have been beneficial over the past years". This strikes me as wrong, but I found the ...
3
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4answers
12k views

“Normalise” or “normalize” (British English)?

Is normalise perhaps obsolete in British English, and normalize preferred instead? I have done some Googling, it seems British English dictionaries prefer normalize, but I haven't found any ...
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3answers
306 views

Is it correct to say “work twice as hard than”? [closed]

The full sentence is: I worked at the very least twice as hard to close sales than back then [two months before]. If it's incorrect how do you say it then — "twice as hard as [at some specific ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Contracting I'd've for I would have [duplicate]

Is it acceptable to contract the phrase in the subject the way above (at least in a spoken English) without raising eyebrows?
1
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1answer
401 views

How should I use “just as .. so ..” phrase [closed]

I have not understood the usage of the phrase "just as .. so" yet. When should I use it ? What is it meant for ? Do the sentences have to be diferent in some way ? "Just as Roni wanted to see ...
2
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1answer
440 views

“exact soluble model” or “exact solvable model”, “analytic” or “analytical” solutions

In physical science and math, we encounter some models that can be analytically solved. This means that the properties of models are fully understood and determined by the analytical solutions. In ...
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2answers
95 views

Am I using “as well as” right?

I would like to ask whether my usage here is right or wrong: Inman had started a long journey. He met persons who helped him, as well as persons who tried to turn him in to the Black Guard whose ...
4
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2answers
35k views

Reservation “under the name”, “in the name”, or “by the name” of Ms. X

Which idiom of "by the name", "under the name", and "in the name" is appropriate for reservations? e.g. There's a reservation by the name of Cullen... She made the reservation in the name of Jordan ...
2
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1answer
86 views

Does English have an expression like “nth day”?

In my native language, if today is 1st and Sunday and we want to refer to the next Sunday (on 8th) then we may say the "today's eighth day" or just "8th day". For example if you're asking when does ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Correct preposition to follow “ineptitude”?

I wish to express John's inability to do a certain activity, e.g. cycling, by using "ineptitude" plus a preposition. Which preposition is most appropriate/accepted? "At" + gerund? "For" + gerund? ...
0
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0answers
27 views

“Hereinafter” usage question

If I use "hereinafter" in a formal document in order to announce I'm abbreviating something can I use the full version afterwards or do I have to stay with the abbreviated version from there on out? ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

what is the difference in usage of 'pertain' and 'appertain'?

In the dictionary the meanings of these two words seem interchangeable so why do the two words exist? Are there different contexts for their usage? Definitions by Merriam-Webster: Definition of ...
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3answers
583 views

to have fun “on a journey” vs “in a journey”

Richard Branson in an interview with Motivated magazine was quoted as saying: To have fun in [my] journey through life and learn from [my] mistakes. Source: PERSONAL MISSION STATEMENTS OF 5 ...
2
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3answers
164 views

The house of a friend of Bob’s

How do I say (a friend of Bob’s)’s house? It’s like a double possesive. Bob’s friends are a class of people. Tom, a friend of Bob’s denotes that he is one among Bob’s friends. Now what if I want to ...
0
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1answer
131 views

Which one is correct-“life” or “lives”? [closed]

I am not sure about what is correct use of words in the following line: They lost their lives saving our lives. or They lost their life saving our lives.
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1answer
1k views

Kudos to you and its usage [closed]

What does Kudos to you exactly mean? Can I use it instead of"Bravo"? I hear it a lot in "Californication".
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4answers
81 views

Are there instances when a new term has been purposely introduced into the language and actually put to use?

I am thinking of the suggested use of ze as an alternative for he or she. I cannot think of an example where such a thing has actually been adopted and put to general use.
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1answer
206 views

Say “you guys” to a group of people [duplicate]

Can we say "guys" to a group of people, that group possibly including women? Example sentence: I am looking forward to see you guys then!