Tagged Questions

How and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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2
votes
2answers
49 views

Is it grammatically correct to use “we” or “us” as well as the name of a group? e.g. “A meeting of we employees went very well.”

Is "we + [name of group]" a grammatically correct construction? Example: "A meeting of we employees went very well." Also, what about this: "They gave donuts to us employees at the meeting."
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Question about about various uses of “to be” and correctness of their usage in my sentence

If I were the man involved, and didn't know my wife was 'pretend', I would be totally crushed when I did find out she was fake. How could I make the above statement correct? If it already is, ...
0
votes
1answer
131 views

What is the difference between interaction, communication, conversation, and discussion? [closed]

I think all of these are kinds of communication. But can't think the difference between the other terms
2
votes
4answers
74 views

Questions from Japan - For guys: When do you use “Please”? [closed]

Will you use "Please" when asking your close male friends to pass you the salt? Why? When do you/don't you use "please" with them (your close male friend)? Were your parents strict in using "Please"? ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Reference material for change in English usage over time

How words have changed in meaning and usage over time is frequently a hot topic both on here and the wider community, and I find it fascinating. Are there any good reference works which document this ...
2
votes
1answer
115 views

Are there any universal rules in appropriating “_an,” “_sh,” “_es,” “_ch” for the demonyms of countries? [duplicate]

Suffixes indicating people and language of country vary by country: _an: American, German, Italian, Belgian, Australian, Russian, Ukrainian, Korean, Mexican, Brazilian, Chilean, Argentinean, ...
0
votes
0answers
89 views

Spelling alphabet: Should I spell out each letter in my name using the spelling alphabet, or only the confusing letters?

I have a long name and spelling out every letter as "a as in alpha, b as in bravo" would take a very long time. I've heard people using only the expansion for confusing letters like M,N etc. and just ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
3
votes
2answers
57 views

How are basement levels in shopping malls designated?

In a mall or somewhere with multiple basement levels, what is the proper way to designate each underground level? We have: first floor, second floor, etc. for above ground floors. Underground levels ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

Phrase: give pause

What exactly does the phrase give (sb.) pause mean? Is it just a simple shortening of the following?: give pause to someone (or give someone pause for thought) cause someone to think ...
2
votes
2answers
146 views

“I'm flabbergasted!” - Old fashioned? Pedantic? Refined? Educated? [closed]

To flabbergast - to overwhelm with shock, surprise, or wonder. "I'm flabbergasted!" - I have only one friend who uses this phrase, so I can't figure out what kind of person uses it. Although ...
0
votes
3answers
203 views

What's the difference between: Is it ok for you?, and: Is it ok with you?

What is the difference and in which context you can use: Is it ok for you? or: Is it ok with you?
0
votes
1answer
48 views

What's the difference between patent and obvious?

Patent is used a lot more in "serious" matters, like legal breaches, such as a "patent breach of law," but does that really mean anything? Does "patent" just sound more refined?
-3
votes
1answer
36 views

why we say in a sea of multiculturalism

the question is about definite and indefinite. why do we say in a sea of multiculturalism rather than in the sea of multiculturalism. cause i think it is multiculturalism not any other things so it ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Difference between audience and audiences? [closed]

I've heard some people say the word audiences in conversation. How does audiences differ from audience and when do you use it?
0
votes
1answer
70 views

Whom did you meet? [duplicate]

I am confused to use the word "whom" in a sentence.Is the above sentence correct? Give me a bit of your mind at what contexts we generally use whom with proper examples.
4
votes
1answer
77 views

'Aesthetical Qualities' - a term to describe pleasing characteristics in texts?

I am trying to figure out if I can use 'aesthetical qualities' to refer to qualities that writers or readers find pleasing in texts. This question comes from a remark by a professor on an essay I ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

What is the difference between “matter-containing media” and “matter”?

I'm reading the english wikipedia entry titled "Radiation". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiation you can find the word in the first paragraph, or by searching. so... What is the difference between ...
7
votes
3answers
114 views

The usage of “banzai”

I started to reread a pretty old mystery of Thomas Harris, “The silence of the lambs,” which I once gave up reading because of difficulty of understanding the narrative studded with technical jargons ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

What slang words and colloquialisms are likely to embarrass an American in England or an Englishman in the U.S.? [duplicate]

An Argentine or Mexican tourist in Madrid, or A Brazilian tourist in Lisbon, will certainly hear phrases he has never heard before and may find some of them offensive. I myself have a list of ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Using plural words when mentioning something in general [closed]

I am extremely weak at English grammar. I would like to ask the following sentence: 'To identify the contents of the crates or boxes, packing list will be prepared and attached outside the crates or ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

“That might even could happen” be considered incorrect? [duplicate]

would you help me out with examining this sentence? "That might even could happen" be considered incorrect? Thank you.
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Difference between 'related to' and 'relating to'? [duplicate]

What is the difference between 'related to' and 'relating to'?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Is repeating the word “that” ok, if it is technically, grammatically correct? [duplicate]

E.g.: "... with all the sustainability considerations that that entails." If I'm correct, the above example is relative pronoun followed by pronoun - it just happens to be the same word for both ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Is there difference in common usage between 'I have an answer' and 'I know an answer' sentences

In common everyday usage is there any diffrence between these sentences: 'I have an answer' and 'I know an answer' My clue: Ad 1. I have some proposition of an answer but I'm not 100% sure Ad 2. ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

“You all should have” vs. “you should have all” vs. “all of you should have”

Which one of these three constructions is more correct: By now, you all should have received your insurance cards. By now, all of you should have received your insurance cards. By now, ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

Is it grammatical to use “same” or “the same” in substitution for an objective pronoun?

I've seen and heard this usage of the pronoun "same" more than once, and it sounded strange to my ears: "Thank you for the book; I will return same shortly." "Wine production has increased, ...
0
votes
2answers
136 views

What's the accurate meaning of “forget yourself”?

I was looking for a translation of the German expression "bevor ich mich vergesse" (lit. before I forget myself) and looked up if the literal translation could be used. In German this expression ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Words to say after someone welcomes me? [closed]

Please can someone tell me some proper words to say after someone say "Welcome to our office"? Other than just "thank you"?
1
vote
2answers
153 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “this side of x”? And how do I use it?

Since I don't understand it in the first place, I better just give you an example: Cracked.com example, says otherwise known as "the pettiest hobo crime this side of aggressive panhandling." ...
1
vote
2answers
106 views

Is this usage of 'of which' correct?

I'm working on an employee manual and I came across this one: "Our team philosophy is to become the best of which we are capable." Is this a correct sentence? The point it's trying to get across is ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Does it make sense to say someone is your senior, such as a sibling?

Does it make sense to say someone is your senior, such as a sibling? I'm writing an essay about myself and was wondering whether or not it is a correct usage of the word.
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Vocabularies about order of the things

I want to know if what certain orders or positions in the orders are in English. The following are my questions, assume that we have ten apples, I put my questions on these apples: What is the name ...
11
votes
12answers
2k views

Neutral alternative to “deny” to mean “assert the untruth [of a claim]”

The term "deny" means to reject the truth of some claim. However, it often seems to imply the claim is in fact true, denial notwithstanding. Smith continued to deny that he had shot Jones. I ...
4
votes
3answers
609 views

The etymology of “redhead” vs. “ginger haired”

All my life I have known people with reddish, orangey hair, to be termed ginger haired. Just as you don't call a blonde a 'yellow head' red head just wasn't a word that was said (wouldn't orange head ...
2
votes
2answers
63 views

What is the definition of definition?

Does a definition need to provide a unique or near-unique description or can non-unique descriptions also be categorized as definitions? For example: Is the statement "An apple is a fruit" a ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

the usage of “insalubrious”

Does it make sense to say an insalubrious relationship between two countries? If not, what would be a better replacement? hey this is my first post on this website.. I'm a non-native english ...
0
votes
4answers
190 views

Is there any reason for saying “he is good-looking”, instead of “he is well-looking”?

A person who has............is said to be.............. "good manners".........."well-mannered" "good behaviour"........"well-behaved" "good intentions"........"well-intentioned" "a good ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Adjective form of “degrade”?

For example, I want to say: This book degrades Western culture. In this form: This book has been described as ??? to Western culture. What would the adjective form be? Is "degradeful" a ...
-1
votes
1answer
64 views

Why We Need To Know About Hyperboles [closed]

So I realize that hyperboles exist, but in school we're taught about them as if they are truly important to what we are going to be doing in life. I realize their usefulness, but why do we need to ...
1
vote
3answers
631 views

“fought in the World War II” versus “fought in the second World War” [closed]

Why is fought in the second World War or fought in the Vietnam War correct but fought in the World War II is not?
18
votes
5answers
2k views

What does “bupke” mean?

There was the following passage in the New Yorker's (August 27) article titled, “A scandal at the C.I.A. May be.” : In January I (David Shafer, novelist) filed a Freedom of Information Act request ...
2
votes
3answers
140 views

Can the word “proxy” be used as a preposition?

At the end of a sentence, I want to insert the following (parentheses included): (proxy my parents, of course). E.g., I sent my brother to his room (proxy my parents, of course). But this ...
1
vote
2answers
159 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
4
votes
2answers
103 views

“Please, cut the apple in halves.” or “Please, cut it in half.”?

I've heard native speakers use "half" but never "halves" in such sentences. If we cut an apple into two identical pieces, we get two halves. It shouldn't, therefore, sound wrong if one used ...
0
votes
2answers
107 views

“Dish of the day“ vs “today's special”

Many restaurants offer a menu which doesn't change from day to day, and in addition offer one choice which varies from day to day, perhaps depending on which ingredients are available. This choice can ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Usage of the phrase 'reviewing over'

I've come across the phrase 'reviewing over' and at first I disregarded it as a hold over from grammar in a foreign language but now I've seen a native English speaker use the same phrase. For ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Usage of “coruscating”

Can coruscating be used as a one word adjective to describe "interesting and exciting"? Basically the usage is "his interesting and exciting research work" which will end up as "his coruscating ...
1
vote
3answers
71 views

When should we expect an answer

What is the proper way to ask this question? When should we expect an answer or When can we expect an answer
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Is the describer needed in 'not…but…" type constructions?

Consider these two sentences: "His actions reveal him to be a husband who is not jealous but is zealous." "Those words demonstrate not his jealousness but his zealousness." Are the words ...