How and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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835 views

How to use the expression “you love it” [closed]

This question builds off of another question (Meaning of fck you) but my question pertains to the expression "you love it". Here are three examples of its usage. 1] From Youth in Revolt (Youth in ...
4
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2answers
510 views

How did “classic” and “classical” come to mean “historic”?

I assume the words classic and classical have a basis in the word class — which is to say, of a category. Why do we use those words to mean old or historically important?
6
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4answers
204 views

How do teachers ask to calculate expressions?

How do American/British primary school teachers ask their pupils to calculate an expression? E.g. What is 2+3 equal to? What is the value of 2+3? ... In particular, I'm interested whether the ...
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2answers
2k views

Difference between control and manage?

They seem to function the same. Manage is even "control in action or use" according to http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/manage. Control is a verb so isn't that in action as well? Thus, is it the ...
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3answers
2k views

Meaning of “Conceptual point of view”

Now and then, I listen the below quoted expression: From the conceptual point of view ... However I still can't get its meaning, I think it is somehow related to the way to think about a ...
6
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6answers
905 views

The usage of “the same…as…”

Which one of the following two sentences is more correct? We use the same space as is specified in Chapter 1. We use the same space as specified in Chapter 1.
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1answer
87 views

Can't understand the meaning of 'blamed exertion' in this sentence [closed]

Doctors blamed exertion and said there was nothing to worry about. I knew exertion means attempts or try. But here what does that mean by 'blamed exertion'?
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1answer
154 views

Is there a collective term for charges & fees?

Say I have documentation of a particular account with both amounts credited & amounts charged(fees). What would be an appropriately descriptive term for the collection of credits & ...
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2answers
171 views

“My brother along with his wife was present in the party” or “My brother along with his wife were present in the party”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: X, along with Y, 'were'/'was' Could someone tell which one is appropriate in the following sentence? My brother along with his wife was/were present ...
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2answers
1k views

Doubt about “held at” usage

Every time I see the prepositional phrase held at being used, it is somehow related to a physical location. Suppose I'm in a process comprising many stages, is it possible/idiomatic to use the held at ...
5
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1answer
470 views

What does “state” in “State University” refer to? [closed]

There are many universities and colleges in the United States with names such as "... State University". The word state has many distinct meanings, but pertinent to this question are: government, ...
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1answer
454 views

Data is/are in a global context

I have been commissioned to script a series of brief videos on the importance of data accuracy and consistency. The videos are directed to employees of a company with offices around the ...
2
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3answers
311 views

Is the word “usurp” already archaic? [closed]

I have some doubts whether the word "usurp" is still used in the modern language. The doubts are based on reading newspapers and magazines. It looks like expression like "to seize" or "to hold" are ...
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1answer
190 views

Why is the “round figure” of a person associated with being “comforting”? [closed]

Example: Miss Beam was all that I had expected middle-aged, authoritative, kindly, and understanding. Her hair was beginning to turn grey, and her round figure was likely to be comforting for a ...
0
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1answer
90 views

Is it correct to write “backup” as a noun? [closed]

I was about to create a folder to keep an archive my important files in. This question got stuck in my mind while renaming it. How do I have to rename that folder? Back up Backup Back-up Are all ...
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2answers
392 views

Meaning of “I am not for you to look into all issues” [closed]

A question asked by a team member to a party outside team.. In response to that.... Manager: (Addressing me) This is the area where we need to be self sufficient. Please think about this, how to ...
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2answers
3k views

Meaning of “long gone” [closed]

*The first artifacts were just wooden poles which have long gone, but these were raised by men in times so ancient* I can't understand what "long gone" means here.
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3answers
659 views

Do thence/whence linger only as rhetorical variants for there/where?

The King James Bible has numerous instances of from thence/hence, including the famous line of Psalm 121: I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills from whence cometh my help. Do thence/whence ...
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3answers
1k views

Behind of or in front of?

We daily use terms like "I was sitting in front of the television" and "Spent the all day behind the computer". What is the most appropriate term to use and why is it that people sit in front of the ...
0
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1answer
282 views

Is ‘Specialist’ lower in rank than noncommissioned or petty officer in military term? [closed]

In business and academic fields, ‘specialists’ are regarded and respected as persons with special knowledge and skill about their own professions, like medical specialist, research specialist and ...
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2answers
1k views

Correct usage of “to” + verb [closed]

I have an interface which limits users' access. I want to write a phrase that expresses it differently. Here is what I come up with The interface offers the option to pick which ones* to ...
6
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3answers
589 views

“A new pair of ” or “A pair of new”

a new pair of shoes / pants / scissors a pair of new shoes / pants / scissors I can’t find which one of those two it should be, and I’ve seen some debate about it. “A new pair of shoes”: Could it ...
4
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1answer
1k views

How did “fʌck” become taboo? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How long has the f-word been in use as an abusive term? What makes a word offensive? I recognize that this is similar to Etymology of the term "curse words" ...
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2answers
1k views

Complaint of vs Complaint for [closed]

Another one of vs for question, here for would be the right choice, because its use denotes the function of purpose as I think it's the case here, right ? When customers complaint of an error ...
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3answers
6k views

Cause for vs cause of

I read this sentence somewhere today, but I think that the of would fit better here than for, don't you think? The cause for the original problem will be analysed in the normal maintenance hours. ...
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6answers
817 views

Which is correct or more common when talking about medicine: “buy drugs” or “buy medicine”?

I mean it in the sense of buying medicine, for example for common cold or other diseases. When talking about buying medicine, which of these sentences is more correct or more commonly used: "go to ...
4
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2answers
449 views

“Has reported” as present perfect vs. “has” as present + “reported” as a noun

In the following sentence below, I want to use the word reported as a noun, but it looks like I’m using the present perfect form has reported. How can one be clear when constructions like this ...
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4answers
13k views

Origin of current slang usage of the word 'sick' to mean 'great'? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How and why have some words changed to a complete opposite? How did 'sick' come to mean 'awesome' or 'really good / cool' in modern U.S. slang? I'm interested in origins ...
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2answers
1k views

Prepositions: “in” vs. “on” a tab/widget

In my quest to grasp the dichotomy between "on" and "in" I have found another example that left me in doubt. Initializes the widgets added on the tabs. Validates the information on the ...
5
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1answer
642 views

Frequency of word use vs number of words

Let's consider a partition of the words in the english language according to respective use frequency. Looking at the frequency graph it should be easy to find classes of words with approximately the ...
0
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1answer
488 views

“toward” vs. “towards” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Toward or towards – what would a native speaker use? Consider the following examples: Fighting towards anti corruption. I am going toward north. I am going ...
4
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2answers
260 views

Is caret a widely understood word?

A caret is the point that text is in inserted in a text box. Is this known widely? Will the average user (non technical) understand this word? What other phrase or word should be used to describe the ...
4
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5answers
2k views

Usage of “vary from”

I'm writing an essay about why people go to college. I want to express that there are many different reasons for going to college. Many people, from very different background, attend college or ...
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3answers
2k views

English usage: Every vs all?

Today I was writing a simple message to be shown to the user whenever at least one field was not supplied. Every/All fields must be supplied. I'm in doubt about the usage of Every vs All, which ...
4
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4answers
437 views

Which is more common - 'the most' or 'most'?

A thing I have never had the time to look more closely into. But I find both variants: What I love most is ... or What I love the most is ... I think the more common form is 'the most', ...
3
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4answers
2k views

What is the difference between “check something” and “check on something”

For example if in answer to the question, "what time does the shop close?" a tourist information officer might say, "I'll check on that for you." Why wouldn't they say, "I'll check that for you."?
7
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2answers
245 views

Can anything be “bated” but one's breath?

We are all no doubt familiar with the phrase "with bated breath," but is it ever used in other contexts?
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5answers
17k views

Usage of the phrase “couldn't help myself” [closed]

I am getting confused at the usage of the phrase "couldn't help myself." For example, let's say I played soccer in the evening. What should I say? I couldn't help myself from not playing soccer. ...
2
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3answers
575 views

Would it be proper to use 'partake' these days?

Is 'partake' an old fashioned word? Would it be proper to use it these days? Thank you @tchrist,@JLG and @MT_Head. I found your answers interesting. By 'proper' I meant in current use. While ...
7
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3answers
530 views

“Have” vs. “Is” + Verb

The phrases have expired and is expired are in practice more or less identical. Formally, of course, they are different in that the former uses expired as a verb with have as its auxiliary, whereas ...
3
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2answers
59 views

How to document a change to an earlier proposal

I wrote an e-mail proposal to send to a client but after asking a co-worker's opinion I decided to reformulate it. Now I have to describe what has been done but I'm not sure if the expression below ...
2
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4answers
159 views

Which is appropriate while addressing in-laws?

Which is appropriate while addressing in-laws? My mother-in-law and father-in-law are visiting us this weekend. Or: My mother and father-in-law are visiting us this weekend.
3
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1answer
495 views

Old-fashioned use of “because”

In books written in the nineteenth century, you can come across sentences like this (quoting from Ambrose Bierce's The Devil's Dictionary): A Pilgrim Father was one who, leaving Europe in 1620 ...
4
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3answers
768 views

Future Perfect with the preposition 'since'

I have a question regarding the future perfect tense and which prepositions go with it. Understandably, by, for, and in work very well with the future perfect. By friday, I will have been working ...
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1answer
1k views

What is the meaning of the idiom “no bells and whistles” and an example usage? [closed]

I am looking for some interesting sentences that employ this idiom.
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4answers
5k views

You didn't miss me, right? (possible answer with correct use of English)

A) No, I didn't miss you. B) Yes, I didn't miss you. C) No, I did miss you. D) Yes, I did miss you. According to my common sense perfect answers can be C) and B) only, and reason behind it is- ...
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2answers
2k views

In Moderation, In Revision

1 The forum comments are under moderation. 2 The forum comments are in moderation. 3 The book is in revision. 4 The book is under revision. Could 1 & 2 be the same? Could 3 & 4 be the same ...
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7answers
504 views

Meaning and usage of “be of”

As I'm preparing my GMAT test, I see the "be of" structure very frequently. for example By 1940, the pilot Jacqueline Cochran held seventeen official national and international speed records, ...
3
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2answers
25k views

“Is equal to” or “equals” [duplicate]

Are both is equal to and equals similar in meaning? Which is the more natural? For example, one plus one equals two or one plus one is equal to two.
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3answers
1k views

What does it mean by “It's been good because it's been bad”? [closed]

Once I asked my friend 'how's the summer treating you?', he replied 'It's been good because it's been bad.' What does it mean? Good or bad?