For questions on how and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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1answer
141 views

What is the difference between “acquisitional”, “acquisitive”, and “acquisitory”?

I am actually a native speaker, but this one threw me. "Acquisitory" seems to be associated with avarice/greed, possibly specifically for material goods. "Acquisitive" also seems to be related to ...
5
votes
1answer
121 views

Why does this use of “the” seem wrong?

I'm helping a colleague edit his paper before submission. He is a native French speaker and I am having trouble saying why "the" isn't necessary in "the threads" or in particular "the shared memory," ...
0
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2answers
96 views

Correct order of addressing [duplicate]

While writing an email on behalf of 2 other people. Should I write.. Savin, Steve and Myself Or Myself, Savin and Steve.. ? I remember reading somewhere it is always, first person, second and ...
0
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0answers
78 views

Grammatical rule for using no article with nouns

I can use "Listing Activation Codes" in an article whose description is the following: Use the following API route to list activation codes and their values. ​In this description, I mean that ...
2
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0answers
97 views

Why is the word “fewer” seemingly doomed? [closed]

More and more I see the word "fewer" less and less. It's being replaced by "less" and seemingly falling into disuse. What is the reason for this? Is it as simple as the marketeers believing, "fewer ...
1
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3answers
196 views

What does “for comfort” in “too fast (close / hot/ warm / crammed) for comfort” mean?

I was drawn to the phrase, “Too fast for comfort” in New York Times (August 10) article with a headline, “China devalues its currency amid economic slowdown.: The move appeared to be a response to ...
4
votes
1answer
112 views

“Double Clicking” to mean, going in depth

I have been recently hearing the expression "double clicking" to mean 'going in depth'. For example: We will double click on this topic later on when required. I have never heard of such a usage ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Does “money laundering” also mean raising funds illegally?

When I looked up what money laundering meant, the dictionary said it meant “concealing proceeds raised from illegitimate sources”. Does money laundering also mean “raising funds illegally”? If not, ...
0
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1answer
114 views

Does 'I certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism' make sense?

I recently watched an interview with a terrible journalist and she said the line: I certainly will not apologize for doing good journalism I'm specifically interested in doing good ...
0
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2answers
160 views

What does “Failure to fail” mean?

Paul Krugman, economist and Op-ed columnist of New York Times wrote in his article under the title, “G.O.P. Candidates and Obama’s failure to fail" - August 10. The shared premise of everyone on ...
0
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3answers
900 views

Preposition in vs. of

Which is correct; "in" poverty or "of" poverty? The children have survived 10 years of poverty. or The children have survived 10 years in poverty. Thank you!
0
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1answer
174 views

Meaning of “on the wax” from an article in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

I do not follow the meaning of "on the wax" below, and do not find its usage in any online dictionary. Yet the original text appears in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, thus peer-reviewed. So I ...
0
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2answers
760 views

What does “work a rope line” mean?

When Presidential race and caucuses are close, the candidates seem to be busy in “working a lope line” as in the following examples:. Wolf needs to work on his rope line speed. - www.pennlive....
0
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2answers
504 views

usage of “Since the last X years”

Is this correct? "Since the last X years, Y is being used as ...". Meaning that Y has been used during the last X years, but also that it has been used for the first time only X years ago. this ...
4
votes
2answers
622 views

What is the difference between “could've” and “could of”? [duplicate]

I have seen people using could of instead of could have. Are both of them correct? Is there a difference in meaning between them?
0
votes
1answer
165 views

is “over the past years” a natural sounding expression?

I have heard "over the past few years" or "over past years", but I just read a document that said "X, Y and Z have been beneficial over the past years". This strikes me as wrong, but I found the ...
0
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3answers
518 views

Is it correct to say “work twice as hard than”? [closed]

The full sentence is: I worked at the very least twice as hard to close sales than back then [two months before]. If it's incorrect how do you say it then — "twice as hard as [at some specific time]"?...
0
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1answer
51 views

Contracting I'd've for I would have [duplicate]

Is it acceptable to contract the phrase in the subject the way above (at least in a spoken English) without raising eyebrows?
-1
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3answers
256 views

Is it possible to say “we were better” meaning “we better” in the past tense?

I know that textbooks maintain that this phrase (even not exactly this, since it's the "incorrect" version of "we had better") should be used only in the present and future tenses but I wonder if it's ...
1
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2answers
137 views

Am I using “as well as” right?

I would like to ask whether my usage here is right or wrong: Inman had started a long journey. He met persons who helped him, as well as persons who tried to turn him in to the Black Guard whose ...
0
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2answers
4k views

“use some rest” vs. “take some rest” vs. “get some rest”?

use some rest take some rest get some rest Which one is correct if I want to tell my friend to go to relax or take a nap? The phrase "take some rest" is familiar me but I also have heard "...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

Does English have an expression like “nth day”?

In my native language, if today is 1st and Sunday and we want to refer to the next Sunday (on 8th) then we may say the "today's eighth day" or just "8th day". For example if you're asking when does ...
1
vote
1answer
917 views

How should I use “just as .. so ..” phrase [closed]

I have not understood the usage of the phrase "just as .. so" yet. When should I use it ? What is it meant for ? Do the sentences have to be diferent in some way ? "Just as Roni wanted to see ...
0
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1answer
85 views

Correct preposition to follow “ineptitude”?

I wish to express John's inability to do a certain activity, e.g. cycling, by using "ineptitude" plus a preposition. Which preposition is most appropriate/accepted? "At" + gerund? "For" + gerund? "In"?...
0
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0answers
36 views

“Hereinafter” usage question

If I use "hereinafter" in a formal document in order to announce I'm abbreviating something can I use the full version afterwards or do I have to stay with the abbreviated version from there on out? ...
2
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2answers
2k views

How should I place “Indeed” in sentence

I would like to say sorry first for my bad english, and I hope you understand me . I have been improving my english recently and I thought about adding "indeed" into my essays , I have certainly ...
1
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3answers
2k views

to have fun “on a journey” vs “in a journey”

Richard Branson in an interview with Motivated magazine was quoted as saying: To have fun in [my] journey through life and learn from [my] mistakes. Source: PERSONAL MISSION STATEMENTS OF 5 ...
0
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1answer
174 views

Which one is correct-“life” or “lives”? [closed]

I am not sure about what is correct use of words in the following line: They lost their lives saving our lives. or They lost their life saving our lives.
0
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1answer
4k views

Kudos to you and its usage [closed]

What does Kudos to you exactly mean? Can I use it instead of"Bravo"? I hear it a lot in "Californication".
2
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3answers
235 views

The house of a friend of Bob’s

How do I say (a friend of Bob’s)’s house? It’s like a double possesive. Bob’s friends are a class of people. Tom, a friend of Bob’s denotes that he is one among Bob’s friends. Now what if I want to ...
0
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4answers
84 views

Are there instances when a new term has been purposely introduced into the language and actually put to use?

I am thinking of the suggested use of ze as an alternative for he or she. I cannot think of an example where such a thing has actually been adopted and put to general use.
0
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1answer
271 views

Say “you guys” to a group of people [duplicate]

Can we say "guys" to a group of people, that group possibly including women? Example sentence: I am looking forward to see you guys then!
1
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2answers
1k views

Whereafter or where after, one or two words?

If I Google the word whereafter, multiple online dictionaries claim it is one word. However, if I type it in Microsoft Outlook, then spellcheck insists that it is two words. Grammarly seems to accept ...
1
vote
1answer
655 views

This is true or That is true?

When someone says something that you agree with, should you say "that's true" or "this is true"? I have heard people say it both ways. My question is for both formal and informal usage.
3
votes
2answers
130 views

Can “it's” be used as a question? [duplicate]

In my experience, people say "it's" in place of "it is," but never in the form of a question. I think the question "It's?" sounds awkward, but I'd like to know if it's grammatically correct. Is it? ...
4
votes
6answers
290 views

Can “weren't” be used in reference to a singular noun?

I've been watching a TV sitcom lately, "Last Tango in Halifax." A main character uses "weren't" instead of "wasn't" and I am wondering if that is considered correct in some areas or dialects? For ...
0
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2answers
42 views

“Sensor outputs” or “sensors' outputs”?

I acquire measurements from several sensors, and I need to filter these signals. Is there a difference between the two sentences below? The sensors' outputs are filtered. The sensor outputs are ...
0
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2answers
129 views

Word with -ee as a suffix

Is it correct English to be able to add the suffix -ee on to any verb to show the object of that verb? Ex: Abandonee is "one to whom something is abandoned" Observee is "one who is observed" ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Past perfect and perfect continuous: a difference in meaning? [closed]

The pavement was wet, it had been raining. The pavement was wet, it had rained. What's the difference?
0
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2answers
2k views

'Relates to' vs. 'Is Related to'

Does the choice between passive/active voice make any difference in the examples below? My question relates to your earlier work. My question is related to you earlier work. Nerve cells relate to ...
0
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2answers
134 views

Help with usage: Having had? [closed]

Is this proper usage? "I feel good despite not having had any coffee today."
0
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0answers
19 views

Genitive case in a sentence where two proper nouns are used [duplicate]

Which of the two sentences is correct: Ion's and Zoe's daughter is at home. or Ion and Zoe's daughter is at home
0
votes
2answers
184 views

How do we use the word “landfall” in a sentence?

May I ask for a specific sentence using the word "landfall"? which has a definition of: a reaching of land as by a traveler, craft, or storm according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

“First, second, last” vs “first because, second because, last because.”

When to use the former or the latter? Example: I picked NTU Library. First, (because) it was my university's library, so I wouldn't have to walk very far. Second, (because) I liked the ...
2
votes
1answer
313 views

Where does the term “sleeve fish” come from?

I was in a snack shop and reading the labels and came across "Thailand Sleeve Fish Slice" on what appeared to be a package of dried squid. I found limited results indicating that it does seem to refer ...
2
votes
1answer
58 views

Proper usage of “assessed” for delinquent bills

Delinquent bills will be assessed a USD 100 (United States Dollar One Hundred Only) charge if payment is not received within 7 days of the due date. Is this the correct usage? Or should the word "...
1
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1answer
114 views

Usage of Quicker and more quickly [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences are correct? Calves require less medication and gain weight quicker than that those raised in consignment. Calves require less medication and gain weight more ...
0
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2answers
57 views

Is a second 'they' needed here?

Dogs can walk, but can't fly. Dogs can walk, but they can't fly. Which sentence is correct? Is the "they" required?
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1answer
81 views

What is the best word for this sentence? [closed]

I want to use the following sentence in my paper. However, I'm not sure if the usage is correct or not: The results indicated that the infiltration of xanthan into sandy soils increased ...
0
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1answer
75 views

Ellipsis followed by another statement - Is it still correct English/use of punctuation?

In transcripts (mainly screenplays/dialogue scripts and some web pages), I see the following: "You could try to do this... or that." CHARACTER gestures at the alternate choice; a big red ...