How and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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YOUR VALENTINE OR MY VALENTINE

I am going to send a gift to a far away lady I care a great deal about.I want to write her a card just to tell her I will always be there for her when she needs me, so to speak (not in any sexual ...
2
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3answers
81 views

What's the official rule regarding use of “welcome” versus “welcomed”?

Which is correct, and why?: Growing my business has been a welcomed challenge. OR Growing my business has been a welcome challenge.
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4answers
3k views

Do 'learn by heart' & 'learn by rote' mean the same?

Here in India, both the phrases learning by heart and learning by rote are taken to have the same meaning, i.e., blind memorisation without true understanding. However, some sources say that to ...
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2answers
39 views

Usage of “indisposed”

I have sometimes heard the word "indisposed" use as synonymous for "unavailable." Especially in the context of leaving a message. For example: "Hello. You have reached X. I am currently ...
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8answers
3k views

Is “layman” an offensive term?

Is it offensive to use the term layman nowadays? Does it insinuate that the people to whom you are referring are uneducated? I am wanting to say This is just one of the ways that CERN's research ...
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1answer
25 views

How to use “more likely”

Is it only valid to use "more likely" as in "Polar bears are more likely to be found in cold places" or could you also say "Polar bears are more likely found in cold places"? Can you use "more ...
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1answer
15 views

In writing dates, when should “last” or “on” be used?

Please enlighten me about the difference in using "last" and "on" when writing dates. For example, which one would be correct: "I attended the meeting on December 14, 2014." Or, "I attended the ...
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0answers
28 views

“hereby referred to” or “hereafter referred to”?

In a document where I would like to change how something is referred to, which would be the correct sentence? The variable x hereby referred to as a... The variable x hereafter referred to as ...
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2answers
132 views

expressions using body parts

'Hands' of a clock, 'Arms' of a chair, 'Nose' of a plane, 'Mouth' of a river. In these expressions human body parts are used.What are such expressions called?
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9answers
279 views

Using “a tiny” in the same way as “a little”

Saying That made me a little happier is clearly perfectly fine, yet no one would really ever say That made me a tiny happier, even though both "little/tiny bit happier" are fine. Is there ...
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32 views

is it appropriate using never mind with i love you [on hold]

is it appropriate to send an email to a far away lady you love this message in Valentine day: never mind i love you always
46
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5answers
4k views

Are there rules to determine whether a musician's title will end with “-er” or “-ist”?

There are drummers, buglers, fifers, whistlers, and fiddlers. Folks who play all the other instruments use the -ist suffix -- pianist, violinist, cellist, tympanist, guitarist, flautist, etc, etc, ad ...
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1answer
44 views

“That” versus “which” [duplicate]

In the following sentence, are the words that and which interchangeable? In general, where to put that and where to put which? The sentence: At the end of this course, students will be able to ...
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2answers
371 views

Can I use the word “promise” with gerund?

Is it possible to use gerund after the verb "promise"? For example, in the sentence "He promised cleaning the window. I'd prefer to say: He promised to clean the window. But today I was told that this ...
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1answer
48 views

Using property name in plural instead of its units

Consider describing an object and referring to some of its properties, that has a unit (eg. weight in kilograms). Is it correct to describe the property not by saying what unit is it in, but using ...
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0answers
61 views

Usage of “regarding” and “about”

I have been corrected by a manager when I used regarding in some of my sentences. Example: Regarding the client visit, we are all set. He said that I should avoid the use of regarding since ...
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0answers
32 views

How many percent vs. how much percent vs. what percent? [closed]

Which one of these is the correct usage in English? If all of them can be used, is there any difference in their meaning?
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0answers
25 views

Is such usage of negation acceptable in everyday conversation? [duplicate]

Let's begin with a sentence such as: We can't do this any more. This is the most standard form and grammatically perfect. But I have also seen or heard many times in some informal occasions ...
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2answers
4k views

What led to the increased usage of “schtupping”?

I was listening to a television show the other day and one of the characters used "schtupping": schtupping — to have sexual intercourse with Dictionary.com notes that the term's origin is ...
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3answers
3k views

Combine sentences with “although”

The question goes; Make a sentence from the given sentences using 'although'. a. We've known each other for a long time. b. We are not very good friends. The intended answer is ' Although we've known ...
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0answers
42 views

Use of prepositions with verbs [closed]

Is there a resource, a dictionary perhaps, that gives the appropriate preposition to use with a verb - an alphabetized list of verbs with corresponding prepositions and example sentences?
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0answers
20 views

When to use Do you understand and Did you undrstand? [closed]

Write answers only. Do you understand? or Write answers only. Did you understand
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2answers
300 views

“She hasn't said but a few words to me…” or “She has said but a few words to me…”?

"She hasn't said but a few words to me since last winter." or "She has said but a few words to me since last winter." Which of these is right? I think the latter is heard more often, but ...
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1answer
58 views

Dedicated to producing vs dedicated to the production - use of gerund in place of noun

- A factory famous for the production of. . . - A factory famous for producing . . . - A farm dedicated to the cultivation of . . . - A farm dedicated to cultivating . . . - The firm focused on the ...
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2answers
251 views

“Dish of the day“ vs “today's special”

Many restaurants offer a menu which doesn't change from day to day, and in addition offer one choice which varies from day to day, perhaps depending on which ingredients are available. This choice can ...
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1answer
85 views

Using “word” to mean “okay” [duplicate]

I tutored an American exchange student in Finland last year and occasionally he, on Facebook, would say something like "word thank you" or simply "word" and he said it means "okay". I was curious and ...
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2answers
89 views

Is the describer needed in 'not…but…" type constructions?

Consider these two sentences: "His actions reveal him to be a husband who is not jealous but is zealous." "Those words demonstrate not his jealousness but his zealousness." Are the words ...
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4answers
890 views

How often is “more often than not”?

A person, supposedly a native speaker of English, assured me that I would say "often" means roughly 50-60% of the time, whereas "more often than not" means 75-95% of the time, and is closer in ...
2
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3answers
271 views

Is “wanna” more common with non-native speakers?

Is the word "wanna" (as opposed to "want to") more common in the writing of non-native speakers than in the writing of native speakers of English? Is this effect more pronounced when you exclude ...
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5answers
2k views

What does “bupke” mean?

There was the following passage in the New Yorker's (August 27) article titled, “A scandal at the C.I.A. May be.” : In January I (David Shafer, novelist) filed a Freedom of Information Act request ...
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1answer
44 views

Another use of the word “given”? [closed]

This is a video from the content producer "JonTron". I noticed, at around 8:12, he says the following: "You get a barrel, you run with said barrel, you throw barrel at given thing, you run back, you ...
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2answers
66 views

… to feel sick Tuesday afternoon / on Tuesday afternoon / from Tuesday afternoon. Which one is correct?

Are they all correct? He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick Tuesday afternoon. He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick on Tuesday afternoon. ...
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4answers
3k views

Is “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet” a common or respectable English expression?

Today’s edition of the New York Times (December 16, 2014) carries an article written by Mark Bittman under the headline “You ain’t seen nothin’ yet.” It begins with the following passage: “What’s ...
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1answer
74 views

Calculus vs calculation

It is becoming more popular on American talk shows to say "calculus" instead of "calculation." To my mind, calculus is either a branch of Mathematics or a stone like in the gall bladder. Any comments? ...
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1answer
53 views

19th C forms of address

In the early 19th C. when the eldest daughter married, did the second oldest daughter become the "Miss Whatever," or did she continue to be identified as "Miss Whoever Whatever?'
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2answers
73 views

time off of work“ or ”time off work"? [duplicate]

Is it "time off of work" or "time off work" without 'of'? Ex: I need to take some time off (of) work next month.
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3answers
44 views

Reporting not-witnessed events

In English, is there a modal, like 'can' or 'would', or a short expression that adds the following meaning to a sentence: "I did not see it with my own eyes but I was told about it"? There is one in ...
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1answer
26 views

Would an “affector” be appropriate for an event driver?

I'm trying to come up with a better word to describe a "driver" or "conditional"; basically, the name of an object or event which is a trigger for something else. Would it be appropriate to say that ...
4
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4answers
267 views

Why did the KJV use “thou” toward God?

The word "thou" (and similar variations of the Latin tu in other languages) was used between people for informal speech, and talking to people of lower standing. So why did people use it (most ...
2
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1answer
103 views

Is “two-Perrier” lunch a businessmen’s buzz word?

There was a line, “He was not one for two-Perrier lunch,” in the eulogy for a British politician who made a great contribution to the formation of E.U. system. Also there is the following passage in ...
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4answers
88 views

Make vs. Do a Video [closed]

Is it "make a video" or "do a video"? I feel like both might be correct in an appropriate context but I cannot quite figure out the real difference. Unless it is just one of the two that is correct. I ...
0
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2answers
14k views

Was vs had been

I guess this question has been asked before, but please take a look the following sentence and tell me if there is a difference between them. When the transaction had been completed, A was still a ...
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3answers
65 views

What is the proper usage of a verb when the subject is singular but its meaning is plural? [duplicate]

I am unsure of this rule, and would like a straight answer or resource; this is not a peeve. This appears today in google trends: A new set of icons suggest that voice-activated sharing to social ...
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2answers
40 views

Above and beyond

What does "above and beyond" mean and how is it used in a sentence? Some sources say it means exceeding expectations, some sources say it means 'in addition to'. Which is it? Is it both?
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3answers
142 views

Is the usage 'the message didn't send' grammatically correct?

I have often encountered this sentence on Facebook; even a web-search of this string indicates that it is used quite commonly. However, is it correct to say so? The dictionary definitions of the word ...
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1answer
42 views

Does one say “allegory for” or “allegory of”?

How does one correctly use the word "allegory" in a sentence? For example: This story is an allegory [for|of] pride. I have seen examples of both: the long poem is an allegory of love and ...
1
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3answers
168 views

Is this usage of 'of which' correct?

I'm working on an employee manual and I came across this one: "Our team philosophy is to become the best of which we are capable." Is this a correct sentence? The point it's trying to get across is ...
0
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1answer
48 views

Op-Ed or Editorial?

I have a piece that is an opinion written by a columnist. If I only had the designation of an op-ed or of an editorial. What word better describes the piece? An editorial is supposed to be written by ...
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1answer
37 views

Language Evolution

Language changes all the time, most often in usage but also in spelling and grammatical form. At what point does a widespread misspelling or incorrect grammatical usage become acceptable and correct? ...
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1answer
62 views

Aspect (simple, perfect and progressive): What are the differences?

Could you please explain to me the differences between the simple, progressive and perfect aspects. 'Simple aspect' means completed action (action starts and finishes) but I don't really understand ...