Questions about uncountable (non-count, mass) nouns

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3answers
52 views

Pronoun for meat: it or some?

I feel the following sentence does not sound usual: I like meat. Can I eat it tonight? I think it is more common to say: I like meat. Can I eat some tonight? Is my understanding correct? ...
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0answers
32 views

Are “caw” or “squawk” countable nouns?

So both "caw" and "squawk" are "a harsh noise made by a bird". Are these two words countable or uncountable? For example, which of the following two is more correct? All night I heard the caw of ...
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4answers
2k views

The article “a/an” with uncountable nouns

Sometimes I read in books sentences where uncountable nouns are used with the article "a/an". For example "She fades like a dew before the sun". Is it out of the common rules? P.S.: Sorry if this ...
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0answers
13 views

one of my “innovations” or “innovation”? [on hold]

I'm puzzled by checking the Oxford Dictionaries http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/innovation. If I want to say "introducing one of my innovations", can I use the word "innovation" ...
1
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1answer
37 views

“a list of” + uncountable noun

I find the following two phrases perfectly correct: A list of books A list of names However, when an uncountable noun follows "a list of", it somehow sounds awkward to me: A list of equipment A ...
4
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3answers
683 views

“I am looking for soaps” or “I am looking for soap” - which one is better?

I think that if I want to ask for something or discuss something an ”s” is needed at the end of a noun, but I don’t know why a singular noun is not sufficient? Every time I have asked a shop ...
14
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6answers
3k views

“None” as plural indefinite pronoun

In my grammar book (English Grammar, HarperCollins Publishers), I read that none is occasionally treated as plural, but it is usually regarded as singular. Can you give me an example of sentence where ...
1
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1answer
52 views

“All the unemployed” vs “every unemployed”

The right to work implies the obligation on the part of the government to give a job to all the unemployed. Can I replace all the unemployed with every unemployed. If yes then OK, but if not then ...
12
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5answers
1k views

The Plural of Email - Emails? [duplicate]

I debated with my peers that we can use the word emails when referring to more than one and it would be grammatically right. But most of them said since we don't say we received mails today, ...
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3answers
57 views

Does stuff become countable when enumerated?

Consider a conversation with a sentence: S: "I bought milk and honey." What is a grammatically correct question referring to the sentence S? Q1: "Where did you put it?" or Q2: "Where did you put ...
2
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1answer
55 views

A code or some code?

When talking about the source code of a program, my Computer Science teacher sometimes refers to single pieces of code as 'a code'. For example: For today's task, you need to write a code which ...
1
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2answers
61 views

Point[s] of datum vs. point[s] of data

I know that there's no any shortage of controversy about "data" and "datum", but I've recently questioned the validity in the specific case of "I am but a point of data". Is this, under the strict ...
2
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2answers
88 views

Confusing sentence, work or works?

Please have a look at this sentence: "Multiple citations of my work during the short time since their publication indicate its quality." Here work is referring to many publications. I have a ...
3
votes
3answers
7k views

With “amount” will you use singular or plural?

I am confused about this grammatical question: large amount of data and the fact that it will exponentially grow large amount of data and the fact that they will exponentially grow (the semantic ...
1
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5answers
258 views

What is the logic behind uncountable nouns?

I'd like to understand the logic behind uncountable nouns, such as "water", "meat" and others, specially "bread", for example. I don't understand why can't we count them, since there are different ...
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2answers
706 views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
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3answers
392 views

What is the plural form of “whitespace”?

I ask this because Firefox suggested that whitespaces is not a valid word; rather it gave me whitespace or white spaces.
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2answers
46 views

Does this statement tell how much work was done? [closed]

On a physics test the instructor asked the following question: If you do work on an object in twice the usual time, your power output is? I said that you could not answer the question because I ...
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2answers
81 views

Is 'experience' countable or uncountable? [closed]

"Seeing the Grand Canyon was certainly____(an /some) experience." Is experience countable or uncountable? Should I use some or an?
5
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3answers
9k views

Why is bread uncountable? How do you describe the “three breads” in the picture?

In this picture there are "three breads", but they are not loaves because loaves can be cut into pieces, and they are not slices either because they weren't cut with a knife. So the only way to ...
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1answer
56 views

“Most of what” and “is” or “are”

I've gotten into an argument about whether "Most of what I've read is books" or "Most of what I've read are books" is correct. I think it should be "is" because "most of" refers to "what I've read" ...
5
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4answers
526 views

Can “listening” be countable?

Can listening be countable? Can I say We will do a listening during today's lesson?
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2answers
73 views

Is numbers countable or uncountable? [closed]

I would like to know if you say: Too much numbers or so many numbers. Is numbers a countable or uncountable noun? and why?
0
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1answer
57 views

can we say 'a pain' ? or 'a piece of pain'?

Here what I'm talking about is 'pain' as a noun, describing something that makes you uncomfortable either physically or mentally. As far as I know, it is countable when describing physical hurts. ...
4
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3answers
243 views

“So many weapons and armor!” What is wrong with this sentence? And how would one fix it?

The sentence rings false in my head. Clearly this is because "weapons" is a countable noun, and "armor" is an uncountable noun. So one could fix this sentence by breaking it up into two clauses (e.g. ...
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7answers
364 views

Use of the word “beeves”

In what sentence would you need to use the plural of beef? The plural is beeves. Plural form of beef (sense 1 of the noun). I have tried every sentence that it could be necessary but I cannot ...
0
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2answers
182 views

When does an uncountable noun become countable?

I wonder why "fat" "carbohydrate" and "protein" can have the plural form as in the following quotes. Aren't those nouns uncountable? The Russian consumer protection agency said Friday it is taking ...
5
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2answers
7k views

Is thanks a countable noun? Many thanks or much thanks?

A colleague of mine recently wrote in an email "much thanks for your efforts." Does this usage make sense? How does "much thanks" differ from "many thanks"? This is similar to "Is “Many thanks” a ...
3
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2answers
130 views

Question about “criticism” and “critique”

Are criticism and critique mass nouns? If not, what semantic area does their countable usage refer to?
3
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6answers
3k views

Is ”Have you got paper?” a well-formed question?

Is it grammatical to ask Have you got paper? Do you have to specify have you got a piece of paper, any paper, or some paper — or can you just say paper?
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1answer
125 views
0
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1answer
53 views

The usage of … number(s) of [closed]

Here we wish to make sure the usage of ... number(s) of ..., which one below is correct? An even number of people An even number of cards Even numbers of people Even numbers of cards An odd ...
5
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1answer
5k views

Plural of feedback

I'm looking for a way to identify a specific amount of feedback items I'm visualizing in a list. The construction of the sentence needs to be generic, so I can't use something like Feedback received ...
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1answer
49 views

Which is correct and why [closed]

You work (too hard/ too much hard). I have (quite a lot of free time/ quite free time).
0
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1answer
101 views

Is it correct to say “Do not duplicate the information, add only new one”?

Information is an uncountable noun. Therefore, is it correct to refer to it with a number one as in: do not duplicate the information, add only new one?
2
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1answer
66 views

“rising sea level” or “rising sea levels”?

I've seen both in newspapers when it comes to the subject of global warming. Confusingly, "rising sea levels" seems to be used more frequently. For me, it's much easier to understand "rising sea ...
2
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3answers
8k views

Why does “information” not have a plural form?

Why doesn't the word information take an "S" in English even if the meaning is "plural"?
5
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3answers
26k views

“Is there” versus “Are there”

Are there any questions I should be asking? Is there any articles available on the subject? My instinct is that in the two questions above, it should be 'are' as the subjects of the sentences ...
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2answers
145 views
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2answers
82 views

'(death) throes' - countability?

In my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary the word 'throe' is not listed, only 'throes'. With other nouns, the dictionary clearly indicates whether nouns are countable or uncountable, however, with ...
1
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3answers
751 views

“Fewer resources” or “less resources”? [duplicate]

I was writing a document in Microsoft Word, and it flagged "less resources" as being ungrammatical and suggested "fewer resources". I did some research, and it appears that "fewer resources" seems to ...
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1answer
114 views

How to say if the word may be countable or uncountable in English?

For example: Maybe the item of travel city include more than one city, But what's the correct writing of Travel City. Should I use Travel City/Cities? Travel Date: 0503, 2014; 0504, 2014 Travel City: ...
49
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11answers
4k views

Is “data” considered singular or plural?

Related to this question and this question. My non-native English speaking friend just asked me: Data is ... or Data are ... I said both but that's because I've been desensitized from ...
4
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1answer
167 views

two uncountable nouns with and

If we had two uncountable nouns with and , would we use a singular or plural form? How much flour and butter is/are needed to make a pizza ?
0
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2answers
136 views

Conjugation of answer to “How much money is there?” [duplicate]

I'm using a website - www.ixl.com - to teach my child how to count American coins, amongst other activities. The site also has many questions on English grammar. One thing that doesn't seem right - ...
2
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1answer
2k views

One type of good - singular or plural

I've read conflicting advice on the use of the word "goods" in an economic context (e.g. "goods for sale"). One piece of advice is that it is a plural noun that should never be used singular (e.g. ...
0
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1answer
297 views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
1
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1answer
218 views

Uncountable noun + of + uncountable noun with or without definite article

It would be much appreciated if you could identify any differences regarding whether using the definite article or not in the two citations below brings about any changes in meaning. What is being ...
0
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1answer
299 views

Is there a countable form for “literature”?

Literature is an uncountable noun, so we can't say one literature or two literatures. But is there a countable form, as there is for information? One piece of information, for instance.
11
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3answers
772 views

Count vs. mass — where can you look this up?

Most dictionaries don't say whether a noun is count vs. mass. Short of asking a fluent English speaker, where can you get this kind of information? I've tried asking various other ESL/EFL people I ...