Questions about uncountable (non-count, mass) nouns

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4answers
80 views

Is “reign” a countable or uncountable noun?

I'm editing an advanced grammar text book and the author and I cannot decide on whether "reign" is an uncountable noun or not. The sentence is: With Mr Smith gone, her reign could begin. ...
0
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2answers
63 views

Would “mould” and “mud” be considered substances made up of parts?

Ignoring the difference in spelling between "mould" and "mold" for the moment, I need to categorise the following terms into "masses of substances" or "masses of substances made up of parts too ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Are All Compound Nouns Countable

Are all Compound Nouns Countable? for example traffic is an uncountable noun but traffic jam is countable. sorry for my mundane question
0
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1answer
30 views

Articles with abstract nouns

Given: In the world of a flourishing globalization Which sort of article should be used before flourishing — zero, definite, or indefinite?
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1answer
67 views

'pizza' and 'cake': uncountable? [closed]

Countable noun and Uncountable noun are really hard to understand. I read "'a cake' is correct, but 'a pizza' isn't correct." Why is 'pizza' uncountable?
13
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4answers
12k views

“Baggage” versus “luggage”

I have the feeling that luggage is more closely associated with vacation travel, whereas baggage is for general transportation. Or... are they just exact synonyms?
3
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4answers
1k views

Why is liquid a countable noun?

I read this sentence in a description to a podcast from https://www.eslpod.com/website/index_new.html Batter, “batter,” when we talk about cooking is a liquid, made usually with eggs, and ...
1
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3answers
152 views

Point[s] of datum vs. point[s] of data

I know that there's no any shortage of controversy about "data" and "datum", but I've recently questioned the validity in the specific case of "I am but a point of data". Is this, under the strict ...
0
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2answers
75 views

“an alarm” vs “the alarm” [closed]

Which ones correct ? All the guests on the boat got frightened when they heard an alarm. (or) All the guests on the boat got frightened when they heard the alarm. I expect the second sentence to ...
2
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9answers
2k views

Use of the word “beeves”

In what sentence would you need to use the plural of beef? The plural is beeves. Plural form of beef (sense 1 of the noun). [OD] I have tried every sentence that it could be necessary but I ...
3
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2answers
54 views

Contrasting emphasis of an uncountable noun

In this translated sentence, water is supposed to be emphasized in contradistinction to the sand in an hourglass/sand clock: Like an hourglass, the device is made of glass and metal, except that ...
1
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3answers
148 views

coffee vs. some coffee

I want coffee. vs. I want some coffee. Does these two sentences completely identical? In general, is it possible to delete the word "some" from every instance of "some coffee", and to keep ...
0
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2answers
1k views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
3
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1answer
105 views

Can 'surgery' be a count noun in the sense of 'medical procedure'?

This is something that has bothered me for a long time. Several years ago a remember noticing in the media a shift from using "An operation" to "A surgery" when talking about someone who was ...
2
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5answers
115 views

Is “education” a count noun?

I'm getting confused about these two sentences: The government should provide education to its citizens. She has received a great education since high school. I think education is an ...
0
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1answer
70 views

Are “caw” or “squawk” countable nouns?

So both "caw" and "squawk" are "a harsh noise made by a bird". Are these two words countable or uncountable? For example, which of the following two is more correct? All night I heard the caw of ...
1
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2answers
5k views

Could you lend me any/a little/../money?

I would like to know how to say that correctly and whether some/any could stand as a subject in the sentence: Could you lend me ... money? Sure, If I find some/any.
1
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4answers
107 views

Should I say “study materials” or “education materials” or “teaching material?”

I am building a web application where people can upload their study materials about robotics and programming and manage them and share etc. I want to name it well, so at the moment I have: ...
54
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11answers
5k views

Is “data” considered singular or plural?

Related to this question and this question. My non-native English speaking friend just asked me: Data is ... or Data are ... I said both but that's because I've been desensitized from ...
1
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3answers
143 views

Single countable word for trash/garbage

I am can't seem to think of a single word for trash or garbage in the singular form. I want to use in a sentence like so: I picked up two [trashes] yesterday. Obviously that is wrong because ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Is it “as many electrons” or “as much electrons”?

I thought it would be "as many electrons", because electrons is a countable noun, but Google shows that "as much electrons" is more popular than "as many electrons"
-1
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2answers
46 views

Is “He has/owns many businesses” correct? [closed]

Business is an uncountable noun,so shouldn't much be used in place of many? Is this correct or not "He has/owns many businesses"?
1
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2answers
85 views

Is “the” needed with the word “code” used in a general programming sense?

Basically, me and my colleagues (not native English speakers) had a discussion on whether we need "the" or not in this sentence: Administrative / system passwords shouldn't be used in the code. ...
0
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2answers
345 views

a “piece” vs. an “item” of clothing

What is the difference between an item of clothing and a piece of clothing? Can I say "three pieces of clothing" or "three items of clothing"? Are they used identically?
1
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2answers
69 views

Is “myriad” not prevalent in “day to day speech”? [duplicate]

I have noticed people using "myriad" when they mean "uncountable" or simply many. Is "Myriad" not prevalent in "day to day speech Can it be used for definite but large amount of anything.
23
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5answers
11k views

Types of things vs. types of thing

When speaking precisely or technically, one would say that "Homo erectus and homo sapiens are two species of hominid" rather than "Homo erectus and homo sapiens are two species of hominids." The ...
1
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2answers
647 views

Does “every time” not mean “all the time”?

In this article, Singapore Plans To Become The World's First Smart Nation, there is an explanation about the E3A plan by Leonard: We're working on something that we've named E3A, which is our way ...
24
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6answers
71k views

Is “there're” (similar to “there's”) a correct contraction?

Q: "Do you have any juice?" A: "Yes, there's some in the fridge." Sounds perfectly fine to me, but: Q: "Do you have any towels?" A: "Yes, there's some in the closet." Does not. I asked ...
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1answer
160 views

Using “pizza” as countable vs. uncountable

I ate pizzas on Sundays. I ate pizza on Sundays. Pizza is both uncountable and countable. In these sentences, is there any difference in meaning? Is one of them wrong?
5
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4answers
15k views

Why is bread uncountable? How do you describe the “three breads” in the picture?

In this picture there are "three breads", but they are not loaves because loaves can be cut into pieces, and they are not slices either because they weren't cut with a knife. So the only way to ...
5
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2answers
9k views

Is thanks a countable noun? Many thanks or much thanks?

A colleague of mine recently wrote in an email "much thanks for your efforts." Does this usage make sense? How does "much thanks" differ from "many thanks"? This is similar to "Is “Many thanks” a ...
0
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4answers
227 views

Countable and uncountable in one word? [closed]

[original question] Do any words words exist that are a countable and an uncountable noun at the same time? Are there any nouns that are both countable and uncountable? Are there any words which ...
0
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3answers
106 views

Difference between usage of 'to' and 'of'

What is the difference between the right to freedom of speech and the right of freedom of speech? Secondly, since in India this right is a provision mentioned in the Constitution, while writing it ...
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4answers
152 views

Pronoun for meat: it or some?

I feel the following sentence does not sound usual: I like meat. Can I eat it tonight? I think it is more common to say: I like meat. Can I eat some tonight? Is my understanding correct? ...
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4answers
3k views

The article “a/an” with uncountable nouns

Sometimes I read in books sentences where uncountable nouns are used with the article "a/an". For example "She fades like a dew before the sun". Is it out of the common rules? P.S.: Sorry if this ...
1
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0answers
93 views

one of my “innovations” or “innovation”? [closed]

I'm puzzled by checking the Oxford Dictionaries http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/innovation. If I want to say "introducing one of my innovations", can I use the word "innovation" ...
1
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1answer
78 views

“a list of” + uncountable noun

I find the following two phrases perfectly correct: A list of books A list of names However, when an uncountable noun follows "a list of", it somehow sounds awkward to me: A list of equipment A ...
4
votes
3answers
907 views

“I am looking for soaps” or “I am looking for soap” - which one is better?

I think that if I want to ask for something or discuss something an ”s” is needed at the end of a noun, but I don’t know why a singular noun is not sufficient? Every time I have asked a shop ...
17
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6answers
4k views

“None” as plural indefinite pronoun

In my grammar book (English Grammar, HarperCollins Publishers), I read that none is occasionally treated as plural, but it is usually regarded as singular. Can you give me an example of sentence where ...
1
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1answer
62 views

“All the unemployed” vs “every unemployed”

The right to work implies the obligation on the part of the government to give a job to all the unemployed. Can I replace all the unemployed with every unemployed. If yes then OK, but if not then ...
13
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5answers
4k views

The Plural of Email - Emails? [duplicate]

I debated with my peers that we can use the word emails when referring to more than one and it would be grammatically right. But most of them said since we don't say we received mails today, ...
1
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3answers
71 views

Does stuff become countable when enumerated?

Consider a conversation with a sentence: S: "I bought milk and honey." What is a grammatically correct question referring to the sentence S? Q1: "Where did you put it?" or Q2: "Where did you put ...
5
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1answer
87 views

A code or some code?

When talking about the source code of a program, my Computer Science teacher sometimes refers to single pieces of code as 'a code'. For example: For today's task, you need to write a code which ...
2
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2answers
359 views

Confusing sentence, work or works?

Please have a look at this sentence: "Multiple citations of my work during the short time since their publication indicate its quality." Here work is referring to many publications. I have a ...
3
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3answers
10k views

With “amount” will you use singular or plural?

I am confused about this grammatical question: large amount of data and the fact that it will exponentially grow large amount of data and the fact that they will exponentially grow (the semantic ...
1
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5answers
348 views

What is the logic behind uncountable nouns?

I'd like to understand the logic behind uncountable nouns, such as "water", "meat" and others, specially "bread", for example. I don't understand why can't we count them, since there are different ...
1
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2answers
1k views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
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3answers
462 views

What is the plural form of “whitespace”?

I ask this because Firefox suggested that whitespaces is not a valid word; rather it gave me whitespace or white spaces.
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2answers
79 views

Does this statement tell how much work was done? [closed]

On a physics test the instructor asked the following question: If you do work on an object in twice the usual time, your power output is? I said that you could not answer the question because I ...
1
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2answers
149 views

Is 'experience' countable or uncountable? [closed]

"Seeing the Grand Canyon was certainly____(an /some) experience." Is experience countable or uncountable? Should I use some or an?