Questions about uncountable (non-count, mass) nouns

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1answer
80 views

uncountable nouns and articles [duplicate]

This is a software. Is this sentence incorrect? As per the explanation given, this has to be "This is software.", but I have seen the usage of "This is a software." even in newspapers. Could you ...
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1answer
43 views

Why indefinite article with “imagination”? [duplicate]

Imagination can't be counted. But I have seen some people using the indefinite article in front of imagination. For example, "Everyone has an imagination." What makes that correct, grammatically?
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3answers
132 views

Are nouns used in “Types of <noun>(s)” singular or plural?

Take for example the word "liquid", which can be both uncountable and countable. Should it be - Types of liquid (There are many different types of liquid.) or Types of liquids? (There are many ...
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1answer
69 views

Density or Densities [duplicate]

I have some problems in using the plural form of a uncountable noun. For instance: "The density of all the solutions is measured." or "The densities of all the solutions are measured." Is there ...
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2answers
908 views

When does an uncountable noun become countable?

I wonder why "fat" "carbohydrate" and "protein" can have the plural form as in the following quotes. Aren't those nouns uncountable? The Russian consumer protection agency said Friday it is taking ...
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1answer
1k views

When saying supplier of a building material should the material be singular or plural?

Which of the following is correct: Supplier of tile, stone, tools and equipment or Supplier of tiles, stones, tools and equipment If you could provide an English rule to know that would also be ...
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4answers
141 views

Is “reign” a countable or uncountable noun?

I'm editing an advanced grammar text book and the author and I cannot decide on whether "reign" is an uncountable noun or not. The sentence is: With Mr Smith gone, her reign could begin. ...
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1answer
283 views

How to say if the word may be countable or uncountable in English?

For example: Maybe the item of travel city include more than one city, But what's the correct writing of Travel City. Should I use Travel City/Cities? Travel Date: 0503, 2014; 0504, 2014 Travel City: ...
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2answers
182 views

Is “He has/owns many businesses” correct? [closed]

Business is an uncountable noun,so shouldn't much be used in place of many? Is this correct or not "He has/owns many businesses"?
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1answer
309 views

Countable vs. Uncountable Nouns [closed]

What is correct: "too much people" or "too many people"?
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1answer
115 views

Which is correct and why [closed]

You work (too hard/ too much hard). I have (quite a lot of free time/ quite free time).
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1answer
4k views

What is the appropriate usage of “attentions”?

I recently wondered what the difference between attention and attentions was, as I've heard both, but couldn't think of or remember when someone would use attentions. One definition for attentions ...
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1answer
107 views

Are All Compound Nouns Countable

Are all Compound Nouns Countable? for example traffic is an uncountable noun but traffic jam is countable. sorry for my mundane question
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1answer
427 views

“Most of what” and “is” or “are”

I've gotten into an argument about whether "Most of what I've read is books" or "Most of what I've read are books" is correct. I think it should be "is" because "most of" refers to "what I've read" ...
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1answer
504 views

“I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on [a] coffee.”

I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on a coffee. I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on coffee. These sentences are from a syllabus book. And I don't know which one is correct.
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2answers
245 views

Is numbers countable or uncountable? [closed]

I would like to know if you say: Too much numbers or so many numbers. Is numbers a countable or uncountable noun? and why?
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1answer
1k views

Do nonsense and bull**** have corresponding plural forms?

For example, I've heard nonsenses, but I've never heard bullshits. Why one is plural and the other is singular? They mean the same thing.