Questions about uncountable (non-count, mass) nouns

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
3answers
1k views

Better wording for “Among other [stuff]”

I have the following problem. I need to say Among other information, [the message] will contain information about the following... I don't like the repetition of "information" here. I thought ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

A code or some code?

When talking about the source code of a program, my Computer Science teacher sometimes refers to single pieces of code as 'a code'. For example: For today's task, you need to write a code which ...
2
votes
2answers
640 views

Does the sentence “I recycle a paper” make sense?

Could the following sentence make sense? I recycle a paper. It's from one of the school English exam's answers, and we're arguing about giving the whole point or half point. The teachers have ...
2
votes
1answer
69 views

“rising sea level” or “rising sea levels”?

I've seen both in newspapers when it comes to the subject of global warming. Confusingly, "rising sea levels" seems to be used more frequently. For me, it's much easier to understand "rising sea ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

One type of good - singular or plural

I've read conflicting advice on the use of the word "goods" in an economic context (e.g. "goods for sale"). One piece of advice is that it is a plural noun that should never be used singular (e.g. ...
2
votes
1answer
229 views

Can I use “any” with singular noun in formal English?

As far I as I remember, "any" and "some" are used with plural nouns or uncountable ones. I know about exceptions for "some" (Wow, some car). But can I say the following and be grammatical: Is ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

Less versus fewer in time related phrases [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Less” vs. “fewer” I am quite pedantic when using 'less' versus 'fewer' but don't really understand how the situation works when it comes to ...
2
votes
2answers
134 views

Confusing sentence, work or works?

Please have a look at this sentence: "Multiple citations of my work during the short time since their publication indicate its quality." Here work is referring to many publications. I have a ...
1
vote
5answers
267 views

What is the logic behind uncountable nouns?

I'd like to understand the logic behind uncountable nouns, such as "water", "meat" and others, specially "bread", for example. I don't understand why can't we count them, since there are different ...
1
vote
3answers
404 views

What is the plural form of “whitespace”?

I ask this because Firefox suggested that whitespaces is not a valid word; rather it gave me whitespace or white spaces.
1
vote
2answers
197 views

Does “every time” not mean “all the time”?

In this article, Singapore Plans To Become The World's First Smart Nation, there is an explanation about the E3A plan by Leonard: We're working on something that we've named E3A, which is our way ...
1
vote
2answers
769 views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
1
vote
3answers
1k views

“The” and superlative of uncountable noun — “the clearest water”?

Uncountable nouns are usually used without an article. Superlatives require definite article. What comes out of these 2 rules when superlative meets uncountable article? We need an example, I hope it ...
1
vote
2answers
507 views

When can you pluralize uncountable nouns?

I have a two part question, the second depending on the answer of the first. I don't know if that is frowned upon, but I'm not sure how else to ask. Foil is an uncountable noun so it is not ...
1
vote
3answers
186 views

Usage of uncountable nouns [closed]

Which option is correct to use in this sentence and why? I have (much, many, an) orange juice.
1
vote
4answers
2k views

The article “a/an” with uncountable nouns

Sometimes I read in books sentences where uncountable nouns are used with the article "a/an". For example "She fades like a dew before the sun". Is it out of the common rules? P.S.: Sorry if this ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Verb agreement of “heaps”/“lots”: uncountable nouns

I am a non-native English speaker and I recently started noticing that most people do not do the correct agreement of the verb with the noun when saying "there is"/"there was"/"here is". They say, for ...
1
vote
4answers
78 views

Pronoun for meat: it or some?

I feel the following sentence does not sound usual: I like meat. Can I eat it tonight? I think it is more common to say: I like meat. Can I eat some tonight? Is my understanding correct? ...
1
vote
7answers
442 views

Use of the word “beeves”

In what sentence would you need to use the plural of beef? The plural is beeves. Plural form of beef (sense 1 of the noun). I have tried every sentence that it could be necessary but I cannot ...
1
vote
3answers
61 views

Does stuff become countable when enumerated?

Consider a conversation with a sentence: S: "I bought milk and honey." What is a grammatically correct question referring to the sentence S? Q1: "Where did you put it?" or Q2: "Where did you put ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Definite article in the beginning of a sentence

I'm confused with the usage of the definite article. During the development the following tasks were accomplished: Software with a graphical interface was created; [some other things] ...
1
vote
2answers
47 views

Does this statement tell how much work was done? [closed]

On a physics test the instructor asked the following question: If you do work on an object in twice the usual time, your power output is? I said that you could not answer the question because I ...
1
vote
2answers
95 views

Is 'experience' countable or uncountable? [closed]

"Seeing the Grand Canyon was certainly____(an /some) experience." Is experience countable or uncountable? Should I use some or an?
1
vote
1answer
606 views

“Seems like an overkill” vs. “seems like overkill” [closed]

I’m wondering if an article is used with the word overkill: Something seems like an overkill (to me). Something seems like overkill (to me). Which is grammatical?
1
vote
1answer
10k views

Can the word “personnel” ever be singular? [closed]

Can personnel be used in reference to a single person? See the example below: Testing must take place by a qualified personnel other than the requestor.
1
vote
2answers
3k views

“It is bad practice …” vs. “It is a bad practice …”

"At work, it is bad practice to go to lunch early." "At work, it is a bad practice to go to lunch early." The noun "practice" is both countable and uncountable. So, could both sentences be ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Could you lend me any/a little/../money?

I would like to know how to say that correctly and whether some/any could stand as a subject in the sentence: Could you lend me ... money? Sure, If I find some/any.
1
vote
1answer
53 views

“All the unemployed” vs “every unemployed”

The right to work implies the obligation on the part of the government to give a job to all the unemployed. Can I replace all the unemployed with every unemployed. If yes then OK, but if not then ...
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Point[s] of datum vs. point[s] of data

I know that there's no any shortage of controversy about "data" and "datum", but I've recently questioned the validity in the specific case of "I am but a point of data". Is this, under the strict ...
1
vote
2answers
86 views

'(death) throes' - countability?

In my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary the word 'throe' is not listed, only 'throes'. With other nouns, the dictionary clearly indicates whether nouns are countable or uncountable, however, with ...
1
vote
1answer
232 views

Uncountable noun + of + uncountable noun with or without definite article

It would be much appreciated if you could identify any differences regarding whether using the definite article or not in the two citations below brings about any changes in meaning. What is being ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Definite article with “Wiener filtering”, an uncountable noun

I have a sentence something like this We apply Wiener filtering to obtain a solution. In this "Wiener filtering" is a uncountable noun. I am not sure whether "the" is required before it.
1
vote
0answers
15 views

one of my “innovations” or “innovation”? [closed]

I'm puzzled by checking the Oxford Dictionaries http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/innovation. If I want to say "introducing one of my innovations", can I use the word "innovation" ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

“a list of” + uncountable noun

I find the following two phrases perfectly correct: A list of books A list of names However, when an uncountable noun follows "a list of", it somehow sounds awkward to me: A list of equipment A ...
1
vote
3answers
903 views

“Fewer resources” or “less resources”? [duplicate]

I was writing a document in Microsoft Word, and it flagged "less resources" as being ungrammatical and suggested "fewer resources". I did some research, and it appears that "fewer resources" seems to ...
0
votes
4answers
85 views

Countable and uncountable in one word? [closed]

[original question] Do any words words exist that are a countable and an uncountable noun at the same time? Are there any nouns that are both countable and uncountable? Are there any words which ...
0
votes
2answers
121 views

“Censorship” as a countable noun [closed]

Is censorships a legitimate word? Obviously it could be used to mean multiple censorships for something.
0
votes
2answers
208 views

When does an uncountable noun become countable?

I wonder why "fat" "carbohydrate" and "protein" can have the plural form as in the following quotes. Aren't those nouns uncountable? The Russian consumer protection agency said Friday it is taking ...
0
votes
2answers
366 views

Is “deliberation” or “deliberations” correct when done over multiple topics?

Are these sentences correct? Contemporary deliberation on American culture, economy, politics in the 20th and 21st century? Contemporary deliberation*s* on American culture, economy, and politics ...
0
votes
1answer
341 views

Is there a countable form for “literature”?

Literature is an uncountable noun, so we can't say one literature or two literatures. But is there a countable form, as there is for information? One piece of information, for instance.
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Is it correct to say “Do not duplicate the information, add only new one”?

Information is an uncountable noun. Therefore, is it correct to refer to it with a number one as in: do not duplicate the information, add only new one?
0
votes
2answers
158 views

When do you use the plural form for nouns that are generally considered uncountable?

When should the plural form of the nouns combustible, material and liquid be used?
0
votes
2answers
145 views

Conjugation of answer to “How much money is there?” [duplicate]

I'm using a website - www.ixl.com - to teach my child how to count American coins, amongst other activities. The site also has many questions on English grammar. One thing that doesn't seem right - ...
0
votes
1answer
406 views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
0
votes
1answer
487 views

Is “goods” countable?

I am referring to goods as in services and goods provided. I came across this definition (emphasis mine): tender document: A written invitation sent to potential suppliers of a good or ...
0
votes
2answers
346 views

Why the indefinite article in “have a good time”?

Why do we use the indefinite article in the expression "have a good time"? Time is an uncountable noun, and we never say "what a beautiful weather!", but "what beautiful weather it is!" Could ...
0
votes
3answers
65 views

Difference between usage of 'to' and 'of'

What is the difference between the right to freedom of speech and the right of freedom of speech? Secondly, since in India this right is a provision mentioned in the Constitution, while writing it ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

can we say 'a pain' ? or 'a piece of pain'?

Here what I'm talking about is 'pain' as a noun, describing something that makes you uncomfortable either physically or mentally. As far as I know, it is countable when describing physical hurts. ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

The usage of … number(s) of [closed]

Here we wish to make sure the usage of ... number(s) of ..., which one below is correct? An even number of people An even number of cards Even numbers of people Even numbers of cards An odd ...
0
votes
2answers
848 views

“No restriction” vs. “no restrictions”

The data center must be flexible. There should be no restriction/restrictions on user's choice of protocols. What should it be?