Questions about uncountable (non-count, mass) nouns

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10 views

Conjugation of answer to “How much money is there?”

I'm using a website - www.ixl.com - to teach my child how to count American coins, amongst other activities. The site also has many questions on English grammar. One thing that doesn't seem right - ...
2
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1answer
124 views

One type of good - singular or plural

I've read conflicting advice on the use of the word "goods" in an economic context (e.g. "goods for sale"). One piece of advice is that it is a plural noun that should never be used singular (e.g. ...
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1answer
78 views

Uncountable noun + of + uncountable noun with or without definite article

It would be much appreciated if you could identify any differences regarding whether using the definite article or not in the two citations below brings about any changes in meaning. What is being ...
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1answer
74 views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
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1answer
91 views

Is there a countable form for “literature”?

Literature is an uncountable noun, so we can't say one literature or two literatures. But is there a countable form, as there is for information? One piece of information, for instance.
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1answer
48 views

uncountable nouns and articles [duplicate]

This is a software. Is this sentence incorrect? As per the explanation given, this has to be "This is software.", but I have seen the usage of "This is a software." even in newspapers. Could you ...
4
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3answers
232 views

Why do you use “much” when mentioning RAM?

How much RAM do I need? Why do I need to use much here? I was under the impression that if I'm mentioning anything countable, I should use many. You can always quantify RAM, so this seems very ...
8
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4answers
854 views

Is radish countable or uncountable?

Are vegetables like cabbage, lettuce, radish countable or not when we talk about food? Which is correct? "We have some cabbage in the kitchen." Or "We have a cabbage." "I added some radishes to the ...
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2answers
259 views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
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2answers
3k views

Why is bread uncountable? How do you describe the “three breads” in the picture?

In this picture there are "three breads", but they are not loaves because loaves can be cut into pieces, and they are not slices either because they weren't cut with a knife. So the only way to ...
2
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1answer
132 views

Can I use “any” with singular noun in formal English?

As far I as I remember, "any" and "some" are used with plural nouns or uncountable ones. I know about exceptions for "some" (Wow, some car). But can I say the following and be grammatical: Is ...
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1answer
134 views

“(zero article) failure” but “the departure”: articles before mass nouns

A quote from The Economist: In Iraq failure to reach a similar security agreement led to the sudden and premature departure of all American forces. Here we have two nouns which may be either ...
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3answers
3k views

Why does “information” not have a plural form?

Why doesn't the word information take an "S" in English even if the meaning is "plural"?
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3answers
444 views

Better wording for “Among other [stuff]”

I have the following problem. I need to say Among other information, [the message] will contain information about the following... I don't like the repetition of "information" here. I thought ...
7
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1answer
422 views

Term for Uncountable Nouns, Mass Nouns which are sometimes countable

While I know how to use the words that I use, I do not know if there is a term to describe words that are uncountable nouns, but at the same time are countable in other circumstances. "Cheese" is one ...
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0answers
18 views

(a) part of something [duplicate]

I've been puzzled about the usage of "part" as an uncountable noun. It often seems to me that there is no difference in meaning between its countable and uncountable form. Is there any difference in ...
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2answers
370 views

“No restriction” vs. “no restrictions”

The data center must be flexible. There should be no restriction/restrictions on user's choice of protocols. What should it be?
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1answer
2k views

What is the plural of “stiffness”?

I’m proofreading for a friend (not that I am an expert on English or his subject matter!), and he has used the word stiffnesss in an engineering context. I believed the plural should be stiffnesses, ...
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4answers
760 views

Can I use the word “milks” when discussing KINDS of milk

Heard at the cafe: "We have three milks: soy, almond, and cow." Is it ok to use the word "milks" in this context? I've heard it in other uncountable nouns, like "essential oils", or "simple sugars", ...
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1answer
245 views

“I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on [a] coffee.”

I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on a coffee. I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on coffee. These sentences are from a syllabus book. And I don't know which one is correct.
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1answer
255 views

Do nonsense and bull**** have corresponding plural forms?

For example, I've heard nonsenses, but I've never heard bullshits. Why one is plural and the other is singular? They mean the same thing.
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1answer
457 views

When saying supplier of a building material should the material be singular or plural?

Which of the following is correct: Supplier of tile, stone, tools and equipment or Supplier of tiles, stones, tools and equipment If you could provide an English rule to know that would also be ...
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2answers
2k views

Should we say less or fewer “fruit and vegetables”?

Fruit is uncountable but vegetables is countable, so we should use less or fewer before them together?
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5answers
4k views

Is “Just a friendly advice” grammatical?

I know that "advice" is uncountable and thus is incompatible with the article "a". However, the phrase "Just a friendly advice" seems to be rather widespread. Is it idiomatic, or incorrect? What is ...
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1answer
246 views

Is “goods” countable?

I am referring to goods as in services and goods provided. I came across this definition (emphasis mine): tender document: A written invitation sent to potential suppliers of a good or ...
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1answer
78 views

Definite article with “Wiener filtering”, an uncountable noun

I have a sentence something like this We apply Wiener filtering to obtain a solution. In this "Wiener filtering" is a uncountable noun. I am not sure whether "the" is required before it.
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1answer
304 views

“Seems like an overkill” vs. “seems like overkill” [closed]

I’m wondering if an article is used with the word overkill: Something seems like an overkill (to me). Something seems like overkill (to me). Which is grammatical?
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1answer
675 views

What is the appropriate usage of “attentions”?

I recently wondered what the difference between attention and attentions was, as I've heard both, but couldn't think of or remember when someone would use attentions. One definition for attentions ...
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3answers
504 views

Count vs. mass — where can you look this up?

Most dictionaries don't say whether a noun is count vs. mass. Short of asking a fluent English speaker, where can you get this kind of information? I've tried asking various other ESL/EFL people I ...
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2answers
619 views

Verb agreement of “heaps”/“lots”: uncountable nouns

I am a non-native English speaker and I recently started noticing that most people do not do the correct agreement of the verb with the noun when saying "there is"/"there was"/"here is". They say, for ...
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2answers
334 views

When can you pluralize uncountable nouns?

I have a two part question, the second depending on the answer of the first. I don't know if that is frowned upon, but I'm not sure how else to ask. Foil is an uncountable noun so it is not ...
11
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3answers
300 views

Difference in usage of “rock” and “rocks”

Recently, I came across this situation where I was asked which one was correct: Fossils are found in sedimentary rock. Fossils are found in sedimentary rocks. Is there is distinction ...
12
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2answers
1k views

Usage of English definite article when referring to generic word

My mother language does not have articles, so I still struggle to choose when to use the indefinte and definite article. The other day, I learned: "The dog is an animal" is acceptable. "The iron is ...
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1answer
3k views

Can the word “personnel” ever be singular? [closed]

Can personnel be used in reference to a single person? See the example below: Testing must take place by a qualified personnel other than the requestor.
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2answers
93 views

“Censorship” as a countable noun [closed]

Is censorships a legitimate word? Obviously it could be used to mean multiple censorships for something.
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3answers
142 views

Can “network” be a mass noun?

I stumbled upon a video having this phrase in its narration, "[The university] has been equipped with computer network, electric systems, and internet". Personally, I never use "network" as a mass ...
2
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2answers
401 views

Does the sentence “I recycle a paper” make sense?

Could the following sentence make sense? I recycle a paper. It's from one of the school English exam's answers, and we're arguing about giving the whole point or half point. The teachers have ...
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3answers
155 views

Usage of uncountable nouns [closed]

Which option is correct to use in this sentence and why? I have (much, many, an) orange juice.
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2answers
206 views

Why the indefinite article in “have a good time”?

Why do we use the indefinite article in the expression "have a good time"? Time is an uncountable noun, and we never say "what a beautiful weather!", but "what beautiful weather it is!" Could ...
1
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3answers
949 views

“The” and superlative of uncountable noun — “the clearest water”?

Uncountable nouns are usually used without an article. Superlatives require definite article. What comes out of these 2 rules when superlative meets uncountable article? We need an example, I hope it ...
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2answers
2k views

“It is bad practice …” vs. “It is a bad practice …”

"At work, it is bad practice to go to lunch early." "At work, it is a bad practice to go to lunch early." The noun "practice" is both countable and uncountable. So, could both sentences be ...
5
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2answers
235 views

Combined reference to multiple leave

Dictionaries(dictionary.com, OALD etc.) suggest that leave (absence from work) is a noun- uncountable, which means it has to be "leave" for plural. Also, searching SE to find ...
2
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0answers
31 views

Less versus fewer in time related phrases [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Less” vs. “fewer” I am quite pedantic when using 'less' versus 'fewer' but don't really understand how the situation works when it comes to ...
4
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3answers
1k views

'… the weather' vs. '… weather'

There are two correct (I hope so) sentences with weather taken from a book: Was the weather nice? Did you have nice weather? Can somebody explain why there's an article in the first ...
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2answers
990 views

Definite article in the beginning of a sentence

I'm confused with the usage of the definite article. During the development the following tasks were accomplished: Software with a graphical interface was created; [some other things] ...
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2answers
3k views

Could you lend me any/a little/../money?

I would like to know how to say that correctly and whether some/any could stand as a subject in the sentence: Could you lend me ... money? Sure, If I find some/any.
5
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2answers
4k views

Is thanks a countable noun? Many thanks or much thanks?

A colleague of mine recently wrote in an email "much thanks for your efforts." Does this usage make sense? How does "much thanks" differ from "many thanks"? This is similar to "Is “Many thanks” a ...
5
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2answers
589 views

Are uncountable nouns considered irregular plurals like man men?

Is "rice", for example only, considered an irregular plural?
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4answers
2k views

When to use “the” before food names

I am new to the English language and I am going to English classes. In the middle of my book, we have a lesson about foods. In this lesson, food names are explained but I do not understand something. ...
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6answers
8k views

“Advice” vs. “an advice”

I have often heard that advice is uncountable and shouldn't be prefixed with an article. So I often force myself to say "a piece of advice". But I've seen it used with an article on a number of ...