Questions about uncountable (non-count, mass) nouns

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0
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2answers
41 views

“It was new experience for me” - without “a”? [closed]

I know that "experience" can be both uncountable and countable. In the former meaning (i.e. knowledge, such as gained by practice), would be valid to say: It was new experience for me. //e.g. ...
1
vote
7answers
92 views

Use of the word “beeves”

In what sentence would you need to use the plural of beef? The plural is beeves. Plural form of beef (sense 1 of the noun). I have tried every sentence that it could be necessary but I cannot ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

When does an uncountable noun become countable?

I wonder why "fat" "carbohydrate" and "protein" can have the plural form as in the following quotes. Aren't those nouns uncountable? The Russian consumer protection agency said Friday it is taking ...
3
votes
2answers
116 views

Question about “criticism” and “critique”

Are criticism and critique mass nouns? If not, what semantic area does their countable usage refer to?
-1
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1answer
55 views

Countable vs. Uncountable Nouns [closed]

What is correct: "too much people" or "too many people"?
0
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1answer
39 views

The usage of … number(s) of [closed]

Here we wish to make sure the usage of ... number(s) of ..., which one below is correct? An even number of people An even number of cards Even numbers of people Even numbers of cards An odd ...
4
votes
1answer
846 views

Plural of feedback

I'm looking for a way to identify a specific amount of feedback items I'm visualizing in a list. The construction of the sentence needs to be generic, so I can't use something like Feedback received ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

Which is correct and why [closed]

You work (too hard/ too much hard). I have (quite a lot of free time/ quite free time).
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Is it correct to say “Do not duplicate the information, add only new one”?

Information is an uncountable noun. Therefore, is it correct to refer to it with a number one as in: do not duplicate the information, add only new one?
2
votes
1answer
52 views

“rising sea level” or “rising sea levels”?

I've seen both in newspapers when it comes to the subject of global warming. Confusingly, "rising sea levels" seems to be used more frequently. For me, it's much easier to understand "rising sea ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

When do you use the plural form for nouns that are generally considered uncountable?

When should the plural form of the nouns combustible, material and liquid be used?
1
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2answers
60 views

'(death) throes' - countability?

In my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary the word 'throe' is not listed, only 'throes'. With other nouns, the dictionary clearly indicates whether nouns are countable or uncountable, however, with ...
1
vote
3answers
286 views

“Fewer resources” or “less resources”? [duplicate]

I was writing a document in Microsoft Word, and it flagged "less resources" as being ungrammatical and suggested "fewer resources". I did some research, and it appears that "fewer resources" seems to ...
-1
votes
1answer
55 views

How to say if the word may be countable or uncountable in English?

For example: Maybe the item of travel city include more than one city, But what's the correct writing of Travel City. Should I use Travel City/Cities? Travel Date: 0503, 2014; 0504, 2014 Travel City: ...
4
votes
1answer
106 views

two uncountable nouns with and

If we had two uncountable nouns with and , would we use a singular or plural form? How much flour and butter is/are needed to make a pizza ?
0
votes
2answers
95 views

Conjugation of answer to “How much money is there?” [duplicate]

I'm using a website - www.ixl.com - to teach my child how to count American coins, amongst other activities. The site also has many questions on English grammar. One thing that doesn't seem right - ...
2
votes
1answer
741 views

One type of good - singular or plural

I've read conflicting advice on the use of the word "goods" in an economic context (e.g. "goods for sale"). One piece of advice is that it is a plural noun that should never be used singular (e.g. ...
4
votes
3answers
211 views

“So many weapons and armor!” What is wrong with this sentence? And how would one fix it?

The sentence rings false in my head. Clearly this is because "weapons" is a countable noun, and "armor" is an uncountable noun. So one could fix this sentence by breaking it up into two clauses (e.g. ...
1
vote
1answer
158 views

Uncountable noun + of + uncountable noun with or without definite article

It would be much appreciated if you could identify any differences regarding whether using the definite article or not in the two citations below brings about any changes in meaning. What is being ...
0
votes
1answer
100 views

when does the noun “time” become a countable noun?

I am writing an email to my friend and want to use this sentence: "I am having a great time." I would like to know whether the above sentence is correct. Also, I know that time can be an ...
0
votes
1answer
158 views

Is there a countable form for “literature”?

Literature is an uncountable noun, so we can't say one literature or two literatures. But is there a countable form, as there is for information? One piece of information, for instance.
0
votes
1answer
54 views

uncountable nouns and articles [duplicate]

This is a software. Is this sentence incorrect? As per the explanation given, this has to be "This is software.", but I have seen the usage of "This is a software." even in newspapers. Could you ...
4
votes
3answers
248 views

Why do you use “much” when mentioning RAM?

How much RAM do I need? Why do I need to use much here? I was under the impression that if I'm mentioning anything countable, I should use many. You can always quantify RAM, so this seems very ...
8
votes
4answers
1k views

Is radish countable or uncountable?

Are vegetables like cabbage, lettuce, radish countable or not when we talk about food? Which is correct? "We have some cabbage in the kitchen." Or "We have a cabbage." "I added some radishes to the ...
1
vote
2answers
410 views

Are frozen pizzas countable or uncountable?

As you know pizzas are countable But when you add another word like, frozen, does it remain countable? Generally, when you add an adjective to a countable word are there any changes?
5
votes
2answers
5k views

Why is bread uncountable? How do you describe the “three breads” in the picture?

In this picture there are "three breads", but they are not loaves because loaves can be cut into pieces, and they are not slices either because they weren't cut with a knife. So the only way to ...
2
votes
1answer
166 views

Can I use “any” with singular noun in formal English?

As far I as I remember, "any" and "some" are used with plural nouns or uncountable ones. I know about exceptions for "some" (Wow, some car). But can I say the following and be grammatical: Is ...
4
votes
1answer
171 views

“(zero article) failure” but “the departure”: articles before mass nouns

A quote from The Economist: In Iraq failure to reach a similar security agreement led to the sudden and premature departure of all American forces. Here we have two nouns which may be either ...
1
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3answers
5k views

Why does “information” not have a plural form?

Why doesn't the word information take an "S" in English even if the meaning is "plural"?
2
votes
3answers
741 views

Better wording for “Among other [stuff]”

I have the following problem. I need to say Among other information, [the message] will contain information about the following... I don't like the repetition of "information" here. I thought ...
7
votes
1answer
464 views

Term for Uncountable Nouns, Mass Nouns which are sometimes countable

While I know how to use the words that I use, I do not know if there is a term to describe words that are uncountable nouns, but at the same time are countable in other circumstances. "Cheese" is one ...
0
votes
2answers
538 views

“No restriction” vs. “no restrictions”

The data center must be flexible. There should be no restriction/restrictions on user's choice of protocols. What should it be?
3
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the plural of “stiffness”?

I’m proofreading for a friend (not that I am an expert on English or his subject matter!), and he has used the word stiffnesss in an engineering context. I believed the plural should be stiffnesses, ...
9
votes
4answers
881 views

Can I use the word “milks” when discussing KINDS of milk

Heard at the cafe: "We have three milks: soy, almond, and cow." Is it ok to use the word "milks" in this context? I've heard it in other uncountable nouns, like "essential oils", or "simple sugars", ...
-2
votes
1answer
295 views

“I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on [a] coffee.”

I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on a coffee. I am puzzled by conflicting opinion on coffee. These sentences are from a syllabus book. And I don't know which one is correct.
-3
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1answer
341 views

Do nonsense and bull**** have corresponding plural forms?

For example, I've heard nonsenses, but I've never heard bullshits. Why one is plural and the other is singular? They mean the same thing.
-1
votes
1answer
546 views

When saying supplier of a building material should the material be singular or plural?

Which of the following is correct: Supplier of tile, stone, tools and equipment or Supplier of tiles, stones, tools and equipment If you could provide an English rule to know that would also be ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Should we say less or fewer “fruit and vegetables”?

Fruit is uncountable but vegetables is countable, so we should use less or fewer before them together?
45
votes
5answers
4k views

Is “Just a friendly advice” grammatical?

I know that "advice" is uncountable and thus is incompatible with the article "a". However, the phrase "Just a friendly advice" seems to be rather widespread. Is it idiomatic, or incorrect? What is ...
0
votes
1answer
339 views

Is “goods” countable?

I am referring to goods as in services and goods provided. I came across this definition (emphasis mine): tender document: A written invitation sent to potential suppliers of a good or ...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

Definite article with “Wiener filtering”, an uncountable noun

I have a sentence something like this We apply Wiener filtering to obtain a solution. In this "Wiener filtering" is a uncountable noun. I am not sure whether "the" is required before it.
1
vote
1answer
429 views

“Seems like an overkill” vs. “seems like overkill” [closed]

I’m wondering if an article is used with the word overkill: Something seems like an overkill (to me). Something seems like overkill (to me). Which is grammatical?
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the appropriate usage of “attentions”?

I recently wondered what the difference between attention and attentions was, as I've heard both, but couldn't think of or remember when someone would use attentions. One definition for attentions ...
11
votes
3answers
638 views

Count vs. mass — where can you look this up?

Most dictionaries don't say whether a noun is count vs. mass. Short of asking a fluent English speaker, where can you get this kind of information? I've tried asking various other ESL/EFL people I ...
1
vote
2answers
781 views

Verb agreement of “heaps”/“lots”: uncountable nouns

I am a non-native English speaker and I recently started noticing that most people do not do the correct agreement of the verb with the noun when saying "there is"/"there was"/"here is". They say, for ...
1
vote
2answers
396 views

When can you pluralize uncountable nouns?

I have a two part question, the second depending on the answer of the first. I don't know if that is frowned upon, but I'm not sure how else to ask. Foil is an uncountable noun so it is not ...
11
votes
3answers
318 views

Difference in usage of “rock” and “rocks”

Recently, I came across this situation where I was asked which one was correct: Fossils are found in sedimentary rock. Fossils are found in sedimentary rocks. Is there is distinction ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

Usage of English definite article when referring to generic word

My mother language does not have articles, so I still struggle to choose when to use the indefinte and definite article. The other day, I learned: "The dog is an animal" is acceptable. "The iron is ...
1
vote
1answer
6k views

Can the word “personnel” ever be singular? [closed]

Can personnel be used in reference to a single person? See the example below: Testing must take place by a qualified personnel other than the requestor.
0
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2answers
102 views

“Censorship” as a countable noun [closed]

Is censorships a legitimate word? Obviously it could be used to mean multiple censorships for something.