The style and appearance of printed matter. The art or procedure of arranging type.

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8
votes
1answer
288 views

How do I show that a singular word is louder than any other in a sentence when writing it?

I know that when a word is capitalized it expresses yelling. What about text showing someone is talking and emphasizing a particular word, but he clearly isn't yelling the word out? How is a "non-...
4
votes
1answer
91 views

Where does the [sic] go in this sentence?

I'm quoting a sentence that has an error in it. ...visitors need to need to apply for a temporary residence permit... I don't want to correct the error, I want to quote it as it's written. But I ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Content word and function word

I would like to ask you about content and function words. Here we make debate with my classmate that auxiliary verb can play the role of content word. For example, I am writing questions on a ...
6
votes
2answers
89 views

Any idea about this 'ul' glyph from 1580's book on orthography?

Second row, all the way to the right. Does this glyph have a name? I am unfamiliar with it and had never come across it before. Page 21 in Bullokars Booke at large, for the amendment of orthographie ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Scientific Nomenclature: italics or roman in an italic environment

Scientific Nomenclature says that: Italics are used for bacterial and viral taxa at the level of family and below. All bacterial and many viral genes are italicized. Serovars of Salmonella ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

Using a short quote at the beginning of a chapter

I want to use a short quote as an opener to a chapter in a university homework. Is there a literary term for this? How would I typeset the proverb shown most correctly for American English? ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

What does title “Cost Effective Web Design” signify in English? [closed]

When addressing on search engines or even writing an email about a business query for a cheap web designer does the statement pass on the message clearly "Cost Effective Web Design" or Should I use a ...
5
votes
2answers
118 views

Curious New Yorker typography [duplicate]

Reading this article on the New York I notice this word reëxamined. It's not the only one written like this, any other word with double vowels will be written similarly. What is the point behind ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

Bold, Italics or Underline? [duplicate]

When writing a letter, or other form of written work, what is the appropriate way to put emphasis on a word or phrase? When would one use bold? When would one use italics? When would one use an ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

Can you use indentations within paragraphs in conjunction with spaced paragraphs

In order to understnad this bear in mind the context that I am in a unique situation in which I am the only student in my English class (its a long story) and therefore I can't confer with other ...
1
vote
3answers
106 views

Opposite of the term “keming” (KEMING)

Is there an opposite of "keming", where there's a kerning problem involving too much space between certain letters? For example: The page looks pretty good, but the spacing between the "_" and "1" ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Manuals of Style and Typography for British and American English [closed]

I would like to know which manuals of style and typography are the most common ones for British and American English. I am interested in the basic manuals and the manuals for technical scientists (...
0
votes
2answers
56 views

Word for letters that aren't typographically similar

For example I, 1, or l (lowercase L) can be indistinguishable from one another depending on the persons writing style. The same for the number 0 and the letter O. Is there a word for letters that are ...
10
votes
0answers
71 views

Is there a broadly-accepted term for the stylized scene separators in novels, like ⁂? [duplicate]

Often in novels (and other written works, though I'm personally most familiar with them from novels), within a chapter you'll find a little glyph that marks a transition to a different scene. ...
0
votes
0answers
52 views

Alphabetic analogue of Numero sign (№)?

I'm typing up a spreadsheet that organises a television series's storyline, and the columns are supposed to be in the following format: . Is there an ordinal indicator I can put there where it says [...
4
votes
4answers
154 views

“Accentuation signals” in English

Unlike in English speaking countries, here in Brazil it is very common to have names with accents. My own name is an example of it: Túlio. In my case, in letter u we have an accentuation signal ...
1
vote
2answers
74 views

How to mark a stressed vowel in a text?

I write an article containing many Russian names and surnames, and sometimes it is important to specify which vowel is stressed (e.g. to distinguish Baskov from Baskov). In Russian we put an accent ...
1
vote
2answers
299 views

Correct use of endash in range of minutes

I am currently working as a web developer, and will occasionally be asked to update a website. A "client" just send me an update containing this text: A 15-30-minute waiting-period is required ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

Use of a hyphen when using a noun as an adjective

In my academic work (physics), I often use a noun as an adjective, and this seems to be a common practise to avoid long sentences. For instance sphere packing stands for packing made of spheres. Is ...
1
vote
2answers
246 views

Bold type and commas

This is a bold statement, but this is normal. The first clause is written in bold. Should the comma be bold or not?
12
votes
4answers
863 views

Principles in the use of letters 'b', 'u' and 'v' in Early Modern English typography

I have been reading a medical book by one late surgeon Thomas Gale. I was wondering the following mix-up of letters 'u','v' and 'b'. This states: "to have the cure of". Letter 'u' is used in the ...
2
votes
2answers
466 views

When to pronounce # for pound, sharp, hash or hashtag? [duplicate]

How to pronounce # in a proper way? Currently, I know it's used to pronounce "pound" in US English, "hash" in British English, "sharp" for C#--a programming language, and number sign to list items. ...
24
votes
6answers
15k views

What is the name of the symbols “<” and “>”?

I know that ^ is called a caret, but this doesn't seem to apply to the similarly shaped but nonetheless different < and > symbols. The only names I've heard them called is the less-than sign and ...
2
votes
1answer
133 views

Has “Extraordinary” Ever Been Spelled with an A-O Ligature?

For example, instead of spelling it as extraordinary, you would write it as extrꜵrdinary. This also applies to its derivations, such as instead of extraordinaire, you would write extrꜵrdinaire. I'm ...
2
votes
2answers
414 views

What are the different ways of highlighting (or emphasising) words in English typography? [closed]

I know the following techniques are used for words in print : Italics, Underline, Bold, ALL-CAPS, Change-Of-Font, Enclosing-In-Single-Quotes, Enclosing-In-Double-Quotes, Change-Of-Colour, & ...
2
votes
2answers
526 views

Arabic numerals vs their corresponding English words in scientific research paper [duplicate]

This question is different from Why do English writers avoid explicit numerals?, as it is about the usage in a physics research paper. Basically, I am not sure when to use Arabic numerals and when to ...
0
votes
1answer
214 views

How to handle non-standard capitalization in formal letters

I am writing a letter to apply for entry into a graduate-level university program through my company. I am struggling on how to write the name of the company in the letter. The company's trademark is ...
5
votes
5answers
775 views

Why does English omit diacritics on foreign names?

Why does English omit diacritics from foreign names that still use the Latin alphabet? For example, why are the Czech tennis player Tomáš Berdych, the Norwegian crime writer Jo Nesbø, or the Polish ...
6
votes
4answers
405 views

Is it acceptable to use a single hyphen as a dash (as the BBC does)?

Is it acceptable to use a single hyphen as a dash (as the BBC does)? Example from BBC News: Venezuela - a major oil producer - has been heavily affected by the fall in oil prices on ...
5
votes
1answer
451 views

With character or sign

Is there a character or sign -- most likely historic -- for 'with', similarly to & for 'and'? Also for 'without'
17
votes
2answers
453 views

Space before apostrophe

In the 1928 Scribner’s (NY) edition of The Plays of J. M. Barrie, I’ve noticed an odd convention: where a contraction happens in middle of a word (e.g., “don’t” for “do n(o)t”), the apostrophe has the ...
1
vote
4answers
1k views

What non-alphabetic characters are valid in English spelling?

Is ' (the apostrophe) the only character which is not part of the English alphabet that can appear in the correct spelling of an English word?
7
votes
2answers
885 views

English Typography in the 17th Century

I was browsing through some very old English texts when I came across this page from The memoires of Sir James Melvil of Hal-hill, by George Scot (1683). The first thing that struck me was the anatomy ...
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Is it improper to use the Right Quote character, if there's no Left Quote character paired with it? [closed]

Laying out a printed catalog (for distribution in the United States), I'm listing the dimensions (using inches) for numerous products. I like Proxima Nova's Right Quote character more than the ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Proper way to include a single character in a sentence, “V,” 'V,' or italic? [closed]

What is the proper way to include a single character within a sentence, double quotation marks, single quotation marks, or italicize it? For example, should it be: The man's face resembled a "V." ...
2
votes
0answers
150 views

What is a note in small print before a drop-cap called [closed]

In this sample from 1776 of Philosophical Transactions via JStor, there is a note in small print set in front of the the large initial starting the article. To make it more clear: It is the phrase "...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

(Name of) and (Best Practice Typography for) Unusual Self-Referential Double Usage

One pattern I find interesting is using a word in an explicit double sense, leading to a self-reference kind of pun. For example: As is the case with such things, however, military intelligence ...
93
votes
3answers
9k views

How did 7 come to be an abbreviation for 'and' in Old English?

According to A History of the English Language: Revised Edition by Elly van Gelderen, p.53, in Old English the numeral 7 was used as an abbreviation for the word and: Abbreviations are frequently ...
19
votes
3answers
6k views

What is the opposite of engraved text?

The name of the building is [opposite of engraved] above the entrance. I'm looking for a word to describe characters that are raised above the surface - the opposite of engraved or sunken text
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Early hyphenation library - 80s - 90s [closed]

I recall back in the late 1980s and perhaps early 1990s a library that was available in a number of forms that achieved excellent hyphenation in many/most languages. I seem to remember it was called ...
5
votes
1answer
129 views

What is the base of a subscript called?

In dingdong , "dong" is the subscript but what is the name for "ding"? Base perhaps!
1
vote
1answer
479 views

Word wrapping rules

Are there any rules or recommendations on word wrapping in English text? For example, consider the following sentence wrapped on two lines: The tragedy of the commons is an economics theory ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Why add extra space between a word and punctuation (e.g. a period, question mark, etc.)? [duplicate]

I was just wondering this because of noticing a lot of people I've worked with typed this way. Examples: Okay, that's great . Thanks, Stephanie . Was there anything else ? I was wondering if ...
9
votes
3answers
783 views

What did Old English use Ꝥ for?

Here are some examples of citations in the OED of Old English where they use a standalone crossed thorn, Ꝥ: Þu aclænsast Ꝥ weofod and ʒehalʒast. Þær after com swulke mon-qualm Ꝥ lute hær ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Middle initial placement

First question: My name is Anh D. Pham, but I go by “Andy”. If I want to include my nickname, where should I put the nickname portion? Anh D. “Andy” Pham Anh “Andy” D. Pham Second ...
5
votes
4answers
333 views

Term or phrase (bygone era) where doodles were part and parcel to writing

I read something a while back talking about this. It was a term or phrase I had to lookup; and it was available via Google-Bing, but not “predominant” - not a universal thing. Not exactly back in ...
1
vote
2answers
325 views

Appropriate punctuation for removing letters in offensive words

Letters in offensive words are often removed to make words less offensive, like f----ed, or n-gger. (Though this isn't just for offensive words—see G-d). What is the best typographic punctuation for ...
1
vote
0answers
205 views

Name of the archaic “F” character used for an “S” [duplicate]

Into the 19th century, accepted orthography often used a letter character that resembles an F (but is not in fact identical to an F) when today we would invariably use an S. What is this character ...
2
votes
3answers
391 views

A word for individual letters?

Is there another word for individual letters of the alphabet, perhaps a typographical reference?
20
votes
5answers
3k views

What Is the Real Name of the #?

I used to say "sharp sign" to refer to the # sign. Today a friend told me that the correct term is number sign or hash sign or even just hash. What is the difference between these options and what'...