Determining English equivalents for words or phrases in other languages.

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6
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6answers
677 views

Is “straight from Kafka” an idiom?

I am working as a translator and in one of my projects, which was about strategic management , I came across this sentence: " In scenarios that come straight from Kafka, the simplest problems take ...
3
votes
3answers
66 views

The state of being a vagabond

I'm looking for an English word that describes the state of being a vagabond, and can be used in a sentence like this: "My only goal is vagabond-age" (to coin a word). More details: I'm trying ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

Concept of “none” in the English language [duplicate]

None of them are/is I don't know if this is the place to ask, but: In German you would say "none of them is" and it totally sounds wrong to me to say "none of them are". As German and English ...
4
votes
2answers
63 views

Person who is responsible for the political guests in the kingdom?

I'm from Georgia, and I need help with a specific word. In one of the history books I found the word mestumre, and in a translation from Georgian it means a person who is responsible for the special ...
-2
votes
1answer
70 views

could you explain the below sentence about reporting?

"Half-yearly reporting included in overall project management costs" a report about the costs of the overall management of the project? or something else?
4
votes
1answer
28 views

How to correctly translate past-tense from languages without Pluperfect? [closed]

The slavic languages do not have a Pluperfect tense (except in very archaic use, and some others to, but for example) - I asked &/or I had asked Russian -ya sprosil Ukrainian - ya zapytav In ...
1
vote
3answers
936 views

Can you begin a sentence with an emotion?

Is it incorrect to begin a sentence with an emotion? For example: "Afraid and alone, he no longer wished to continue on." I'm translating some work from a foreign language into English, but I ...
9
votes
1answer
339 views

A question for train lovers (a specific part of a steam locomotive)

I am currently translating a text concerning steam locomotives (from Slovak to English) and I am a little bit stuck on an issue with a certain part of a steam locomotive (in the red circle). Is ...
10
votes
6answers
4k views

Is there an English word for a woman who has recently given birth?

In some cultures, there are lots of customs about a woman who has recently given birth to a baby, such as feeding special fancy meals to her, taking special care of her, and so on for (a certain ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

Who is a “person who makes notary action”?

A notary is a person who certifies documents. Who is "a person who makes notary action"? Is that the notary or the customer who asked for his documents to be certified? I got this phrase from a local ...
-2
votes
3answers
41 views

Paraphrase or a clear translation [closed]

Coop died, streaming with dysentery over a slit trench in an agony of jabbering delirium, killed by dehydration. In the sentence above, the italicized phrase between two commas is confusing. What ...
0
votes
6answers
253 views

Is there an English idiom equivalent to “coup de main”

I am looking for a translation of the French military term coup de main. (Not the common French civilian usage which translates as helping hand.) The term occurs frequently in the correspondence ...
3
votes
3answers
901 views

English for “À l’abordage!”?

Basically, pirates would use the term À l’abordage! as a battle cry when boarding enemy ships like described in the phrase’s Wiktionary entry. Is there a English translation for this, or is it an ...
14
votes
7answers
2k views

What is the English synonym for the German word “Sparmeister”?

Well, the title pretty much says it all. A Sparmeister (noun), briefly speaking, is a person who is concerned about his finances and tries to avoid spending money whenever possible. a ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

how to refer a person with undefined sex? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)? The title is a little confused because I don't know how to explain in one line, ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

How would you call a word that doesn't exist or translate well into another language?

I've run into this situation several times, being a native Spanish speaker. There are some words you just can't translate into another language. Is there a particular word to describe this? I'm not ...
2
votes
3answers
200 views

Some battles take long to win - correct? [closed]

I was speaking with my friend (neither of us is English native speaker) and regarding his relationships, I used the following: Some battles take long to win I have never heard that or been able ...
2
votes
6answers
328 views

Something as an “antechamber” for something else

In Italian there is the expression "something as an antechamber for something else", meaning something can precede and somehow cause something else. For example: Data show prisons are far from ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

Is there any expresion in English that means “ in the right meaning ”

In Arabic we say ¨in the right meaning¨ when we want to add an expression better than the first one. E.g. ¨I am in best way today¨ or (in right meaning) ¨I am so happy¨.
6
votes
6answers
372 views

What is the proper English term for polycopié (de cours)?

In French, several universities use polycopiés instead of course books for teaching. The term polycopié can be translated as handout. Is it correct to use it in this case, in which a polycopié ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

What does commute/commutation mean in this context?

I am trying to understand the following sentence from a legal document. Can anyone explain me what 'commutation' means? Immovable property presently sold is free and clear of all seigniorial ...
2
votes
2answers
51 views

Notarial Deed Translation from Canadian English

I have to translate an English document from Quebec into Polish language. However, there is one sentence that I cannot understand: As the whole now subsists with all its rights members and ...
2
votes
6answers
122 views

The word for “professional system” or “task system”

I work with software engineering and in norwegian (I'm from Norway) we have a word, "fagsystem", which refers to a software system/application that is specialized to handle a certain kind of business ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Establish a band or Found a band or else?

The example sentece: "The Beatles was established/founded/else in 1970s by their members" What is the correct verb?
0
votes
1answer
24 views

What is the exact translate of “number of listening”?

The words I want to translate is that how much a song is listened? Number of listening or number of listened or anything else? the translate of the number how much a song is downloaded would be good. ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

The definition of 'word-for-word translation' [duplicate]

Could I have the accurate definition for "word-for-word" translation?
1
vote
2answers
162 views

English name of “Maegami tomeru” (前髪とめ〜る)

"Maegami tomeru" (前髪とめ〜る) is a Japanese velcro-like product that keeps womens' hair in place. Is there a commonly accepted English translation of this name? Bang Blocker found it hard to find a good ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Which one of the different meanings of the word “consensus” to choose

I'm struggling with a translation of a technical text describing the process of minimization of a logical function (computer science & tech. stuff) and I don't seem to compe up with any logical ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

How to translate the German term “Selbstverständnis” with respect to organisations?

The German term "Selbstverständnis" can be used in the context of (typically) not-for-profit / non-profit organisations to denote the aims they have and the (typically social) changes they try to ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

Words that mean “obsessed with theory” and “obsessed with data”

I'm looking for one-word terms to describe someone obsessed with theory and someone obsessed with data. We use the Spanish terms 'teoricón' and 'datoso' which roughly translate to 'theorophile' and ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

The use of word “apply” for “apply someone to college”

Discussion started here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/556494 from the translation of "Nosotros la vamos a aplicar." from spanish which literally translates into "we are going to apply her" (la in ...
2
votes
3answers
111 views

“Ten and several minutes”: Any more natural expression?

Heat the mixture for ten and several minutes. What is a more natural way to express this “ten and several” wording, which is literally translated from Japanese? A. for between ten and 20 ...
0
votes
3answers
43 views

What is the correct translation

I am trying to translate Invictus by William Ernest Henley into my language. I was done translating it, but I had a discussion with a fried for the first line. Out of the night that covers me. ...
8
votes
7answers
1k views

What do you call those two strands coming out of the electric capacitors?

Here is a picture of a capacitor: What are these two metal wires called in the professional world in the US?
2
votes
5answers
401 views

What is the best Bible translation by which I can speak proper English if I read it enough times? [closed]

Since over one month I'm reading in over eight different Bible translations in order to find out whose English language is most adapted for today's English language, including grammar, idioms and ...
12
votes
6answers
2k views

Is there an idiom that conveys the meaning of the French “mi figue mi raisin”?

The French idiom “mi figue, mi raisin” (literally: “half fig, half grape”) refers to someone or something that is neither entirely good, nor entirely bad. I guess the meaning of the expression can be ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Running out of 1%? [closed]

In a book it says: Not much planning, analysis, or consultation is required to pick up a box of cornflakes on the way home from work. And we were running out of 1% milk anyway. I would get ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

How do I translate this italian locution? [closed]

Often in Italian we use this locution: venire meno Now I wanted to translate it and I didn't come with an 'immediate' translation. Somebody knows the English equivalent?
0
votes
1answer
32 views

What does this mean? What is meant?

I read a book about how the capital limits of a company are limited by the risk inhereted in the complete industry sector. They give as an example oil companies and the last paragraph is: One last ...
15
votes
7answers
4k views

English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日) — “sunshine filtering through leaves”

Is there an English equivalent of komorebi (木漏れ日), which means the sunshine filtering through the leaves of a tree (or trees)? It is made up of three kanji and the hiragana particle れ. The first ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Is there an idiomatic expression in English for a baby urinating?

I'm translating a children's story from Russian into English, and there is a phrase that I'm having trouble translating into a way that sounds natural in English. A baby boy urinates unexpectedly and ...
7
votes
9answers
2k views

Translation of German “Bolzplatz” – what's the name for an outdoor area whose purpose is to provide room for soccer/football?

I am particularly looking for a good translation for the German word "Bolzplatz". This is an outdoor area where people can play soccer/football (you know, this is the most favorite sports in Germany). ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

The name of a robotics tool that is only a sharpened rod

There is a tool used in robotics that is essentially just a rod of metal with a sharp point. It is fastened to the robot not for the purpose of manipulating, stabbing or poking holes, but solely ...
6
votes
2answers
238 views

Word or expression for guys who slept with the same woman(prostitute)?

Embarrassingly, in Korean, there is a slang word for this kind of relationship between guys. Might be translated as, "the husband of my wife's sister but only by the hole" ? I don't know how can I ...
3
votes
4answers
66 views

What is a good translation of “crâne de piaf” as a nickname?

I'm looking for a translation of "Crâne de piaf", in English, in the context of a nickname given to some fictional character. Also, take note that I am native from France. What I'm looking for, ...
2
votes
2answers
915 views

What is the proper name of a “line account”?

I've come across having to translate the Danish word "stregregnskab" to English. The direct translation would be "line account", but I seem to recall there being a proper name for this sort of ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

Is there an English name for Piacenza (Italy)?

Up until now, I believed that the city of Piacenza, Italy, had an English name, equal to its French name: "Plaisance". However I've searched its article on Wikipedia, and I've noticed it's just ...
1
vote
1answer
89 views

How to translate these kind of phrases?

I am confused in translating some kind of phrases such as below : Which one of the pairs is true? If both, What is the difference? and what is the meaning of the phrase? (I mean if I want to explain ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

Translation suggestion for the name of a book [closed]

I'm not a native English speaker, and trying to translate the name of a book into English. It's a book about how to travel by bike, and the name I can come up with is An alternative way to travel -- ...
2
votes
7answers
5k views

Is there an equivalent of the spanish “que hueva” slang expression in English to denote that you feel lazy about doing something?

In Spanish slang, particularly in the west, the expressions "que hueva" or "me da hueva" are used, respectively, to convey that you are lazy about doing something. The context might be as follows: A: ...