Determining English equivalents for words or phrases in other languages.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
1answer
29 views

Waving his flag around the globe?

I'm onto translating an article about a chef who has several restaurant around the globe and the original sentence (Turkish) included an idiom like following to indicate the chef's omnipresence and ...
-1
votes
0answers
55 views

“he always texted me” translation [on hold]

I came across a sentence translate "he always texted me" I under stand he always texts me or he used to text me. But I have never heard this. Is this grammatically correct? Where I came accross: ...
6
votes
9answers
2k views

The meaning of “blue canoe” in the lyrics of “Where to Now, St. Peter” sung by Elton John

In his song Where to Now, St. Peter, Sir Elton John sings: I took myself a blue canoe, And I floated like a leaf Dazzling, dancing half enchanted In my Merlin sleep. Crazy was the ...
27
votes
27answers
10k views

Derogatory term for a corporate employee

I’m looking for a derogatory term for a person who works in a big, international business. In Polish we have a few informal words for that, like korpoludek (“corpo little guy”) and korpoczłowiek ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

What’s the Modern English word for Old English “preost”? [closed]

Preost is an Old English word; I need to know what it is in Modern English.
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Can a car be “naked”?

It's a rare event when I can't find the English equivalent for an Italian expression. It's even rarer when that Italian term consists of one word, but in English I have to build an entire phrase. ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Become / get, successfully / effectually, together / common / united [closed]

Currently I'm looking for a product name. The goal of this product is that everyone can get successful with the power of a network (together, united) But I don't know which combination makes sense: ...
4
votes
2answers
177 views

The right phrase for “stand with the name” for a product?

There is a well known german phrase: Dafür stehe ich mit meinem Namen Which indicates, that a person or company promises quality of his/their product. And to underline it, they guarentee this ...
2
votes
2answers
31 views

What is a “Select Committee” in the context of an 1833 English report?

I'm French, and I'm currently working on a historical report on English society in the early 19th century for a school exam. I'm working from an English book, and I have a translation problem. I ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

“To leave its throne to something else”?

I want to define a situation where a certain type of food is the best in my opinion and express this in an idiomatic way. Would the the following example be completely understood by the native ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

How would you translate “Kommandostab”, “command bar”, from German?

How would you translate "Kommandostab" from German? The literate translation is "command bar", this object was used to give orders to the army. Full sentence: "In der rechten Hand hält er einen ...
3
votes
7answers
7k views

What are the different nuances of “passing with distinction” in a CV?

I am in the middle of translating my (German) CV to English. In the German/Austrian school system, there is the notion of passing ... ... "mit gutem Erfolg" (which is better than average, yet not ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Shakespearian equivalent of 'very'

What would the early modern english/shakespeare equivalent of 'very'be in the sentence: 'That was very nice' ?
5
votes
1answer
61 views

“farne di tutti i colori” in English

Does anyone know the English translation for "farne di tutti i colori"? It's an Italian expression meaning "do all sorts of things" The literal translation would be: to do something in every colour. ...
0
votes
5answers
1k views

Pessimism idiom - opposite of rose-tinted glasses?

In Hebrew, we say "pink glasses" to mean optimistic observation, and "black glasses" for pessimism. I was trying to figure out how popular the literal translations are in English. I found "rose-tinted ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Correct?: To come upon such positive resonance

I am trying to find a good translation for the German Auf eine positive Resonanz stoßen Can one say Something comes upon such positive resonance when I want to express that something is ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

A Dish X Starring Y Ingredient (Is it possible to say?)

I want to say a dish X features the ingredient Y in order to emphasize 'the main and the most important ingredient in the dish is Y' in a pompous way. Or is it still possible to go with the verb "to ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

Translation of Merkel Speech in Auschwitz

German chancellor Angela Merkel said at the Auschwitz commemoration: "Es ist eine Schande, dass Menschen in Deutschland angepöbelt, bedroht oder angegriffen werden, wenn sie sich irgendwie als Juden ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Shakespearean equivalent of genuinely?

What would the word 'genuinely' as in: 'genuinely I am being really funny' be in early modern english, of Shakespeare era? ?
0
votes
1answer
75 views

What is the early modern equivalent of ' I think ' [closed]

Would the term 'I think' be used in this era? I'm looking at translation for a piece of art, I'm wanting to translate flippant/meaningless language from today (things people say drunk, tweets etc.) ...
1
vote
3answers
56 views

Correct translation for the light switch for a website

I'm looking for the correct translation for a website (http://www.configurator.simonurmet.com/). I'd like to refer to the whole object, I don't need the name of each part for now. The "whole ...
11
votes
9answers
1k views

Word similar to “distraction” but with jokey connotation

I was wondering if there is a word that carries the same meaning as "distraction" but can be used for a comedy effect too. As an example, imagine a situation where my parents are away and I've been ...
2
votes
4answers
100 views

“Gastronomy winds”?

I'm trying to find a way to translate a title with a direct translation "Gastronomy winds blowing from X". I don't think it sounds pretty in English, plus can't find a better alternative other than ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Translation of mathematical term

In Italian, we say that something holds "definitivamente" for a sequence if it is true for all the elements of the sequence from a certain starting point on (to the limit if it exists). What is the ...
15
votes
24answers
2k views

Favourite untranslatables [closed]

What are your favourite words and idioms in other languages that don't have good, succinct equivalents in English? (The issue of whether there is, or could be, a sentence on one language whose ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

“To take tangible/concrete steps”

I need to translate a line including "taking concrete steps towards sth" with a direct translation. As I took the translation from the dictionary, it doesn't seem to be really used by the native ...
12
votes
6answers
4k views

Is the “female” in “female cousin” redundant here?

"My female cousin working for a finance company was dismissed. Disappeared along with her job were her confidence and smiling face." There is a very complicated system in Chinese for naming ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Is “sub-project” more like “support project” or “child project”? [closed]

I have a controversy of my project's leader about the meaning of "sub-project". When we need to translate sub-project from English to our native language (Vietnamese), I think that we should ...
3
votes
4answers
107 views

The state of being a vagabond

I'm looking for an English word that describes the state of being a vagabond, and can be used in a sentence like this: "My only goal is vagabond-age" (to coin a word). More details: I'm trying ...
2
votes
2answers
67 views

what's the English phrase for the Chinese one “Destination at south, heading to north”?

There's a famous Chinese fable:   Once a man wanted to go to the south, but his carriage was heading north. A passer-by asked him: "If you are going to south, why is your chariot heading north?"The ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

What does “Payment with return”?

I'm just working on translating document from English to Polish. The document is called "Account Transcript" and it is from US Internal Revenue Service. Transactions table at the bottom contain ...
6
votes
6answers
713 views

Is “straight from Kafka” an idiom?

I am working as a translator and in one of my projects, which was about strategic management , I came across this sentence: " In scenarios that come straight from Kafka, the simplest problems take ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

Concept of “none” in the English language [duplicate]

None of them are/is I don't know if this is the place to ask, but: In German you would say "none of them is" and it totally sounds wrong to me to say "none of them are". As German and English ...
4
votes
2answers
73 views

Person who is responsible for the political guests in the kingdom?

I'm from Georgia, and I need help with a specific word. In one of the history books I found the word mestumre, and in a translation from Georgian it means a person who is responsible for the special ...
-2
votes
1answer
79 views

could you explain the below sentence about reporting?

"Half-yearly reporting included in overall project management costs" a report about the costs of the overall management of the project? or something else?
4
votes
1answer
53 views

How to correctly translate past-tense from languages without Pluperfect? [closed]

The slavic languages do not have a Pluperfect tense (except in very archaic use, and some others to, but for example) - I asked &/or I had asked Russian -ya sprosil Ukrainian - ya zapytav In ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Can you begin a sentence with an emotion?

Is it incorrect to begin a sentence with an emotion? For example: "Afraid and alone, he no longer wished to continue on." I'm translating some work from a foreign language into English, but I ...
9
votes
1answer
382 views

A question for train lovers (a specific part of a steam locomotive)

I am currently translating a text concerning steam locomotives (from Slovak to English) and I am a little bit stuck on an issue with a certain part of a steam locomotive (in the red circle). Is ...
10
votes
6answers
4k views

Is there an English word for a woman who has recently given birth?

In some cultures, there are lots of customs about a woman who has recently given birth to a baby, such as feeding special fancy meals to her, taking special care of her, and so on for (a certain ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Who is a “person who makes notary action”?

A notary is a person who certifies documents. Who is "a person who makes notary action"? Is that the notary or the customer who asked for his documents to be certified? I got this phrase from a local ...
-2
votes
3answers
46 views

Paraphrase or a clear translation [closed]

Coop died, streaming with dysentery over a slit trench in an agony of jabbering delirium, killed by dehydration. In the sentence above, the italicized phrase between two commas is confusing. What ...
0
votes
6answers
298 views

Is there an English idiom equivalent to “coup de main”

I am looking for a translation of the French military term coup de main. (Not the common French civilian usage which translates as helping hand.) The term occurs frequently in the correspondence ...
3
votes
3answers
985 views

English for “À l’abordage!”?

Basically, pirates would use the term À l’abordage! as a battle cry when boarding enemy ships like described in the phrase’s Wiktionary entry. Is there a English translation for this, or is it an ...
14
votes
7answers
3k views

What is the English synonym for the German word “Sparmeister”?

Well, the title pretty much says it all. A Sparmeister (noun), briefly speaking, is a person who is concerned about his finances and tries to avoid spending money whenever possible. a ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

how to refer a person with undefined sex? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)? The title is a little confused because I don't know how to explain in one line, ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

How would you call a word that doesn't exist or translate well into another language?

I've run into this situation several times, being a native Spanish speaker. There are some words you just can't translate into another language. Is there a particular word to describe this? I'm not ...
2
votes
3answers
213 views

Some battles take long to win - correct? [closed]

I was speaking with my friend (neither of us is English native speaker) and regarding his relationships, I used the following: Some battles take long to win I have never heard that or been able ...
2
votes
6answers
335 views

Something as an “antechamber” for something else

In Italian there is the expression "something as an antechamber for something else", meaning something can precede and somehow cause something else. For example: Data show prisons are far from ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

Is there any expresion in English that means “ in the right meaning ”

In Arabic we say ¨in the right meaning¨ when we want to add an expression better than the first one. E.g. ¨I am in best way today¨ or (in right meaning) ¨I am so happy¨.
6
votes
6answers
381 views

What is the proper English term for polycopié (de cours)?

In French, several universities use polycopiés instead of course books for teaching. The term polycopié can be translated as handout. Is it correct to use it in this case, in which a polycopié ...