Determining English equivalents for words or phrases in other languages (that is, translation into English)

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0answers
49 views

English analogue for russian aphorism parody “for seven troubles there is single reset” [on hold]

There is such Russian aphorism-proverb as "Семь бед - один ответ". It has English analogues: "As well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb" or "In for a penny, in for a pound". To be clear, literally ...
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1answer
84 views

English word for “kör olası” [on hold]

The word "kör olası" in Turkish is kind of similar in usage to the word "damned" in English but with a different meaning. It literally means "my it be blinded". So, for instance, I jabbed a finger ...
12
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3answers
2k views

It's too cute! But what is “it”? [on hold]

Sometime on the Internet we see some cute cat doing some cute things: And because of that, an English speaker will say: It's too cute. Because I'm French, and in French we have no good equivalent ...
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3answers
80 views

Does the “defense sickle” exist in english football/soccer language?

In German football vocabulary, there exists a so called Abwehrsichel during defensive play. The meaning can best be seen at this youtube video at the 09 second mark: ...
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1answer
27 views

What does “ leadups and outs” mean in following content?

What does "leadups and outs" mean in this quote? The best way to approach learning how to play "Flight of the Bumblebee" is to work on memorizing bits of it at a time. A lot of the piece is ...
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0answers
30 views

How should I translate this? [migrated]

I recently started translating a book from Turkish into English, but I'm not sure how translations are usually carried out. So, for instance, if I encounter a sentence which sounds good in Turkish but ...
19
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2answers
744 views

When did we stop translating proper names?

It used to be that one would just translate a proper name that was in another language into English when referring to that entity. For example, William the Conqueror, Christopher Columbus, King ...
3
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1answer
274 views

What is the English equivalent of the Russian saying “my ears are curling into tubes”?

Background: Russians use this saying to describe extreme heat conditions in "Banya" when it is becoming almost unbearable. Russian Мои уши в трубочку сворачиваются? English literal translation My ...
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15answers
5k views

Are there English equivalents for “as beautiful as butt inside out”?

There is an old saying in Ukrainian folklore, which literally sounds like “[someone is] as beautiful as ass inside out” (“Гарна як срака навиворіт”). It is used when one wants to point a person's ...
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2answers
41 views

Waving his flag around the globe?

I'm onto translating an article about a chef who has several restaurant around the globe and the original sentence (Turkish) included an idiom like following to indicate the chef's omnipresence and ...
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5answers
328 views

English equivalent of Greek saying

My Greek friend has told me a Greek saying, which roughly translates to: The thief screams to frighten the landlord Effectively it means: You are only making a fuss so that nobody accuses you, ...
4
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7answers
178 views

English equivalent of “amae” (甘え) - the feeling of pleasurable dependence on another person

Amae is simply defined as the feeling of pleasurable dependence on another person but there is more to it. I'm including an example sentence for the sake of showing how the word can be used but this ...
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1answer
115 views

How to translate these kind of phrases?

I am confused in translating some kind of phrases such as those below. Which one of the pairs is true? If both, What is the difference? and what is the meaning of the phrase? (I mean if I want to ...
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0answers
31 views

What is the term for a type of residence when I live at my relatives' place?

I'm translaing a CV from Russian to English. There is an item on applicant's residence type. I translated two other options as Owned and Rented (Собственное жильё и Арендованное жильё in Russian), but ...
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2answers
144 views

Does the word “vain” necessarily have a negative denotation or connotation?

I don't really know how to answer my Brazilian students when they ask me how to say "vaidoso/a" in English. The Portuguese word does not convey a bad idea but "vain" does. Or does it?
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4answers
10k views

What is the difference between translation and transliteration

It's always intrigued me what the difference is between these two terms. I can guess that translation is a contextual translation whereby the original foreign text is maintained with any language ...
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5answers
9k views

English equivalent of the French custom “l'apéro”

In France, when gathered with friends, it is customary to drink beers or other light alcohol around 7pm, and this time is called apéritif (or apéro). Does this custom have an English (UK and/or US) ...
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1answer
44 views

meaning of “mask out” in screen printing

I'm having a hard time translating a passage about screen printing. For screen prints, mesh (originally silk) is stretched tautly across a frame. An image is glued or otherwise affixed onto the ...
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0answers
37 views

Meaning of “fact of nature” in a paragraph

A friend of mine is translating a text about the Millennial Generation and asked me about the meaning of "fact of nature" in the excerpt "technology wasn't a fact of nature at these times". It is part ...
0
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1answer
86 views

Looking for a way to say that no buses or trams are arriving

I am creating an app for Android in my locale language (French) and in English. It will display when the next buses or trams will be coming in real time. I would like to know if this sentence is ...
3
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2answers
77 views

A word or phrase for a person who acts or dresses like the weather is going to change suddenly?

In Portuguese, when a person carries an umbrella on a sunny day, we say that this person is "calling the rain". When they wear a sweater on a warm day, we say that they are "calling the cold ...
4
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1answer
81 views

What is it called when a word is translated phonetically from a foreign language to English?

For example, the word "jihad." Translated, the word means "struggle" or "strive" and I am sure there are others. The word "jihad," is just taking the pronunciation of the word in the native tongue, ...
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3answers
48 views

“Visitor” instead of “Dish” [closed]

I have two small questions. I'm translating a gastronomy website and the original text sometimes refer to the dish as the visitor. For example: The next visitor of our table was mackerel with ...
6
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9answers
3k views

The meaning of “blue canoe” in the lyrics of “Where to Now, St. Peter” sung by Elton John

In his song Where to Now, St. Peter, Sir Elton John sings: I took myself a blue canoe, And I floated like a leaf Dazzling, dancing half enchanted In my Merlin sleep. Crazy was the ...
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27answers
10k views

Derogatory term for a corporate employee

I’m looking for a derogatory term for a person who works in a big, international business. In Polish we have a few informal words for that, like korpoludek (“corpo little guy”) and korpoczłowiek ...
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3answers
1k views

Can a car be “naked”?

It's a rare event when I can't find the English equivalent for an Italian expression. It's even rarer when that Italian term consists of one word, but in English I have to build an entire phrase. ...
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1answer
46 views

Become / get, successfully / effectually, together / common / united [closed]

Currently I'm looking for a product name. The goal of this product is that everyone can get successful with the power of a network (together, united) But I don't know which combination makes sense: ...
4
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2answers
185 views

The right phrase for “stand with the name” for a product?

There is a well known german phrase: Dafür stehe ich mit meinem Namen Which indicates, that a person or company promises quality of his/their product. And to underline it, they guarentee this ...
2
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2answers
33 views

What is a “Select Committee” in the context of an 1833 English report?

I'm French, and I'm currently working on a historical report on English society in the early 19th century for a school exam. I'm working from an English book, and I have a translation problem. I ...
0
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1answer
26 views

“To leave its throne to something else”?

I want to define a situation where a certain type of food is the best in my opinion and express this in an idiomatic way. Would the the following example be completely understood by the native ...
0
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1answer
64 views

How would you translate “Kommandostab”, “command bar”, from German?

How would you translate "Kommandostab" from German? The literate translation is "command bar", this object was used to give orders to the army. Full sentence: "In der rechten Hand hält er einen ...
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7answers
7k views

What are the different nuances of “passing with distinction” in a CV?

I am in the middle of translating my (German) CV to English. In the German/Austrian school system, there is the notion of passing ... ... "mit gutem Erfolg" (which is better than average, yet not ...
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1answer
44 views

Shakespearian equivalent of 'very'

What would the early modern english/shakespeare equivalent of 'very'be in the sentence: 'That was very nice' ?
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1answer
69 views

“farne di tutti i colori” in English

Does anyone know the English translation for "farne di tutti i colori"? It's an Italian expression meaning "do all sorts of things" The literal translation would be: to do something in every colour. ...
0
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5answers
2k views

Pessimism idiom - opposite of rose-tinted glasses?

In Hebrew, we say "pink glasses" to mean optimistic observation, and "black glasses" for pessimism. I was trying to figure out how popular the literal translations are in English. I found "rose-tinted ...
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1answer
19 views

Correct?: To come upon such positive resonance

I am trying to find a good translation for the German Auf eine positive Resonanz stoßen Can one say Something comes upon such positive resonance when I want to express that something is ...
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0answers
30 views

A Dish X Starring Y Ingredient (Is it possible to say?)

I want to say a dish X features the ingredient Y in order to emphasize 'the main and the most important ingredient in the dish is Y' in a pompous way. Or is it still possible to go with the verb "to ...
2
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1answer
90 views

Translation of Merkel Speech in Auschwitz

German chancellor Angela Merkel said at the Auschwitz commemoration: "Es ist eine Schande, dass Menschen in Deutschland angepöbelt, bedroht oder angegriffen werden, wenn sie sich irgendwie als Juden ...
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1answer
43 views

Shakespearean equivalent of genuinely?

What would the word 'genuinely' as in: 'genuinely I am being really funny' be in early modern english, of Shakespeare era? ?
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1answer
94 views

What is the early modern equivalent of ' I think ' [closed]

Would the term 'I think' be used in this era? I'm looking at translation for a piece of art, I'm wanting to translate flippant/meaningless language from today (things people say drunk, tweets etc.) ...
1
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3answers
66 views

Correct translation for the light switch for a website

I'm looking for the correct translation for a website (http://www.configurator.simonurmet.com/). I'd like to refer to the whole object, I don't need the name of each part for now. The "whole ...
13
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9answers
1k views

Word similar to “distraction” but with jokey connotation

I was wondering if there is a word that carries the same meaning as "distraction" but can be used for a comedy effect too. As an example, imagine a situation where my parents are away and I've been ...
3
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4answers
104 views

“Gastronomy winds”?

I'm trying to find a way to translate a title with a direct translation "Gastronomy winds blowing from X". I don't think it sounds pretty in English, plus can't find a better alternative other than ...
2
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1answer
66 views

Translation of mathematical term

In Italian, we say that something holds "definitivamente" for a sequence if it is true for all the elements of the sequence from a certain starting point on (to the limit if it exists). What is the ...
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24answers
2k views

Favourite untranslatables [closed]

What are your favourite words and idioms in other languages that don't have good, succinct equivalents in English? (The issue of whether there is, or could be, a sentence on one language whose ...
2
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1answer
52 views

“To take tangible/concrete steps”

I need to translate a line including "taking concrete steps towards sth" with a direct translation. As I took the translation from the dictionary, it doesn't seem to be really used by the native ...
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6answers
4k views

Is the “female” in “female cousin” redundant here?

"My female cousin working for a finance company was dismissed. Disappeared along with her job were her confidence and smiling face." There is a very complicated system in Chinese for naming ...
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2answers
62 views

Is “sub-project” more like “support project” or “child project”? [closed]

I have a controversy of my project's leader about the meaning of "sub-project". When we need to translate sub-project from English to our native language (Vietnamese), I think that we should ...
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4answers
121 views

The state of being a vagabond

I'm looking for an English word that describes the state of being a vagabond, and can be used in a sentence like this: "My only goal is vagabond-age" (to coin a word). More details: I'm trying ...
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2answers
74 views

what's the English phrase for the Chinese one “Destination at south, heading to north”?

There's a famous Chinese fable:   Once a man wanted to go to the south, but his carriage was heading north. A passer-by asked him: "If you are going to south, why is your chariot heading north?"The ...