4
votes
5answers
286 views

What is the proper English term for polycopié (de cours)?

In French, several universities use polycopiés instead of course books for teaching. The term polycopié can be translated as handout. Is it correct to use it in this case, in which a polycopié ...
0
votes
5answers
116 views

Is there an English idiom equivalent to “coup de main”

I am looking for a translation of the French military term coup de main. (Not the common French civilian usage which translates as helping hand.) The term occurs frequently in the correspondence ...
2
votes
1answer
96 views

The instrument that measures the consumption of water

What is the English name of this instrument, that measures the consumption of water? In Hebrew we call it "Sheon Mayim" (literally: "water clock"), but in English, water clock is a clock for ...
1
vote
2answers
119 views

Forms of strict reporting — what do Americans call them?

I had to deal with typographically printed sheets with some generic text and fields to fill in information by hand (dates, signatures etc.) or through printing (if you are lucky to hit the fields). ...
1
vote
0answers
90 views

Theatrologue: what are peoples' opinions on the use of this word in English? [closed]

I often edit texts that have been translated from Slovenian language and it is common that the Slovenian word teatrolog gets translated into English as "theatrologist", a word to which I find I am ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Correct translatation of the German word “Folgeverhalten” in the technical domain of control feedback systems

I have asked various online dictionaries about the translation of the German word Folgeverhalten. At these dictionaries it is translated as "subsequent behaviour" or "following behavior". I am in ...
1
vote
4answers
938 views

'Horeca', is it English? Alternatives?

In Dutch there's a quite commonly used word that denotes the commercial sector around selling food and beverages for immediate (or near-immediate, e.g. take-out meals) consumption: horeca. (This ...
1
vote
2answers
672 views

Is there a popular / informal way of expressing a need to use a toilet?

In (Canadian?) French, we have an expression, "j'ai envie" (litteraly: I want), which, when used without any subject, means that the speaker needs to use a toilet, either to urinate or defecate. It is ...
18
votes
9answers
2k views

How can I translate the words for the two types of bathrooms found in Russia into English?

I work in real estate, and sometimes I have to translate respective inscriptions from my native Russian into English. I get stuck in some cases where not only linguistic, but cultural differences have ...