Questions about verbs that take direct, or both direct and indirect, objects.

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0
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2answers
36 views

Can “look” be transitive in the meaning “look at”?

For example: He examined the body indifferently, much like one would look a dead animal on a roadside. I would like to know if to look can be employed transitively like this. I'm sure I've read ...
0
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2answers
71 views

Should “afford” be transitive in “my chosen path has afforded (to) me unique opportunities”?

In a college essay I wrote a sentence that reads: Sixteen years later, my chosen path has afforded to me unique opportunities, limitless learning, and potential for growth. Should I use the verb ...
3
votes
2answers
200 views

How to distinguish between uses of words like 'Marry'?

Marry can be used both transitively: "Paul Married Jane" and intransitively: "I got married". Thus making the word ambitransitive But it has a third use: "Paul, the vicar Married Jane ...
1
vote
2answers
693 views

“click on the image” vs. “click the image” [duplicate]

Transitive verbs take object directly. Source - http://grammar.about.com/od/tz/g/tranverb02term.htm If "click" is a transitive verb, why do we say "click on the image" and not "click the image"?
1
vote
3answers
169 views

Is the verb 'inquire' bitransitive?

People say the verb inquire can be bitransitive (i.e., ditransitive) and also monotransitive. I can find many examples of its monotransitive use, but none about bitransitive. Could you show me how ...
0
votes
1answer
218 views

“We provide you the ideal environment”

I wonder if I can also write "We provide you the ideal environment" or only "we provide you with the ideal environment"
1
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2answers
245 views

Can the verb “intake” be used intransitively? [closed]

Can a combustion engine be said to intake oxygen?
1
vote
1answer
1k views

“Enquire about whether” vs. “enquire whether”

I'm writing to you to enquire whether you have a need for I'm writing to you to enquire about whether you have a need for Which is proper?
3
votes
2answers
289 views

“Suffer” vs. “suffer from”

I would like to know the difference between "suffer" and "suffer from". From the dictionary, I cannot distinguish between them. In particular, which of the following should I use: suffer ...
2
votes
2answers
119 views

“Contest against an argument” or “contest an argument”?

I have a student that repeatedly writes of “contesting against former arguments”. Is this correct? I know it is normally “contest an argument”, but I’m not sure if the other use is valid also.
0
votes
3answers
548 views

People can ‘abide by’ the law, but can the law ‘abide people’?

Time magazine copy chief and copy editor pointed out the grammatical errors of many movie titles, and suggested corrections in the article of Time magazine (May 24) titled “Writing Wrongs: 10 Movie ...
2
votes
1answer
186 views

Usage of “accrue” in “it accrued to me to gently ask” [closed]

A newage hippie Facebook friend just sent me this. I was just wondering if it was syntactically correct, It accrued to me to gently ask if you could consider extending the same respect, you would ...
4
votes
3answers
217 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
0
votes
3answers
208 views

'Meeting us' or 'meeting with us'?

What is the difference between meeting with someone or meeting someone? For example when I would like to ask someone if he is happy to meet with me and my friend for the first time, how should I ask? ...
6
votes
2answers
541 views

“Disappear” as a transitive verb

I hear it more on more frequently on the news, as in: The North Korean regime has disappeared scores of dissidents over the past twenty years. Has disappear always been used in such a way, as a ...
-2
votes
1answer
1k views

Passive voice for sentences like “He is going somewhere”

I have this sentence that I trying to render into passive voice: Tom is going to school. According to the rules described in this document (“Passive voice with direct and indirect objects”), it ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

"crash someone's couch” vs “crash on someone's couch”

I am wondering which one is the exact expression. I thought that here "crash" is used in place of "occupy", which means the first one is the correct expression. On the other hand I have always heard ...
-1
votes
1answer
59 views

Grammaticality of “help someone something” [closed]

A few times I've encountered phrases of the form "help yourself [something]", for example "help yourself some water". I consider this form to be ungrammatical, but I am not a native speaker. Is it ...
1
vote
1answer
177 views

Is this transitive or intransitive?

Let's consider this situation. A mother asks her child, "Who ate this apple?" Then her son replies, "I didn't eat." In this situation, is "eat" an intransitive verb when "the apple" is omitted? I ...
0
votes
1answer
132 views

Is “develop” transitive in “technology developed by X”?

In the following phrase, is developed a transitive verb? Technology developed by the XXX company.
2
votes
1answer
326 views

Use of gerund without preposition “to”

Can I use gerunds with the word "concede" without using preposition "to" as in the sentence below? He concedes killing his wife.
0
votes
1answer
415 views

“Ride a bicycle” or “ride on bicycle”?

Which is correct, "ride on a bicycle" or "ride a bicycle"?
-1
votes
1answer
426 views

Which of the following sentences are correct?

Can someone please tell me which of the following sentences are correct and which are the differences between them? Prove me wrong. Prove I'm wrong. Prove me I'm wrong. Prove me that I'm ...
1
vote
2answers
600 views

“Something suffices the condition that” vs. “it suffices that something”

In a book I am reading there is a sentence: Our initial version of Cauchy's theorem begins with the observation that it suffices that f(z) [a function] have a primitive in a region Ω In ...
3
votes
5answers
362 views

Is the “live” in “He only lived a few days after the accident” intrasitive or transitive?

An example sentence from the Cambridge Dictionary: [I] He only lived a few days after the accident. [I] means "intransitive verb". He (subject) + lived (verb) + a few days (noun). What part of ...
0
votes
1answer
435 views

deputizing and covering…“for” or not

Which of the following is grammatical? I am deputizing for him/her. I am deputizing him/her. I think in the case of covering you have to use: I am covering for him/her. ...or do ...
12
votes
5answers
681 views

Can the verb “wonder” simply take an object?

In this question, the questioner states I wonder the origin of the word. Can wonder take a simple object like that? Or should it be wonder about or wonder at or something similar (or something ...
1
vote
2answers
786 views

What's the difference between using the verb “change” transitively and intransitively?

I am confused about using transitive and intransitive verbs for making passive sentences. Especially when that verb can be both (like the verb change).
0
votes
2answers
190 views

Can “fornicate” be used as a transitive verb? [closed]

(I’m asking this for someone else who doesn’t know about this site (yet).) Could fornicate be used as a transitive verb, as in We have to keep A from fornicating B. I don’t believe it can.
1
vote
3answers
236 views

“Bash something” vs. “bash on something”

I was looking into my dictionary that lists many uses of the verb bash but always transitive ones. According to that, I would expect to say: He bashed him. He bashed the chair. But I can see ...
3
votes
6answers
3k views

Is the sentence “It provides people an easy way to communicate.” grammatically correct?

My inclination is to say that the sentence needs to be “It provides people with an easy way to communicate.”, but I'm struggling to explain why. Certainly provide can be used transitively (“I provide ...
7
votes
2answers
234 views

To lose someone something

A headline today reads UBS Says Rogue Trader Lost Firm $2 Billion In Unauthorized Dealing. Apparently, the meaning is that because of this trader, UBS lost $2 Billion. Yet, the headline somehow ...
4
votes
2answers
495 views

Is “We embraced.” a complete sentence?

Can someone write "we embraced" to mean "we embraced each other?"
9
votes
4answers
6k views

Usage of the verb “provide”

Does the verb "provide" always have to be used with "with"? For example, Can you provide me with some good examples? Can you provide me some good examples? Can you provide some good ...