Transitive verbs require an object; they are not complete without a direct object.

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is “I bring that statement to contest” grammatically correct?

My question is if the sentence "I bring that statement to contest" is grammatically correct and in a logical sequence of words that can be understood. Also, I would like to know if that is a ...
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0answers
20 views

What transitive verbs can act intransitively

How can we judge a transitive verb to be used correctly when it's in intransitive form in a sentence? For example, are these uses of transitive verbs correct? I drink. He answered. They will give.
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2answers
137 views

Is “He died himself.” a correct sentence?

I've checked Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary and I found that die is an intransitive verb most of the time. I checked other dictionaries as well. I didn't find any usage of "die" as per which we ...
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1answer
33 views

Can commensurate be used as a transitive verb?

I need to make two datasets commensurate. Can I "commensurate" them?
3
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1answer
94 views

What are some give-type verbs that cannot undergo straight dative alternation?

The following dative alternations sound off to me: I want to donate my clothes to charity. --> I want to donate charity my clothes. He has to submit his paper to his teacher. --> He has to ...
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1answer
44 views

Transitive / intransitive verbs

I’d appreciate a second opinion on an exercise I’m doing, that is, to determine whether the main verbs of sentences are transitive or intransitive. The sentence is as follows: The teacher decided ...
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1answer
55 views

“Hover a link” vs “hover over a link” [closed]

Which is correct: "hover a link" or "hover over a link"? (context: hovering a mouse over a computer hyperlink) I'd especially appreciate a reference (like a dictionary citation) so that I learn how ...
2
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3answers
2k views

Intransitive verbs with preposition in passive sentences

The words listen, shout, etc. are intransitive verbs, but why are they used in passive sentences with preposition to, at, etc.? e.g: she was never listened to. I don’t like to be shouted at. ...
0
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1answer
26 views

The construct: [subject] “approximates” [something] to [something else]

Cambridge provides this example of "approximate" as a verb: to come near in ​quality, ​amount, ​value, or ​character: The ​painting only approximated the ​mountain ​landscape. Similarly, ...
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0answers
14 views

“To” with transitive verbs [duplicate]

Which sentence sounds better: "Who is she speaking to?" or "To whom is she speaking?". As I see, the both are grammatically correct, whereas books have the former example and in speech I notice ...
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0answers
36 views

Is “posit Pluto not a planet” a valid rendering of “posit that Pluto is not a planet”?

The fragment "posit Pluto not a planet" is particularly awkward, but would "posit tomato a fruit" or "posit tomatoes as fruits" be any better as a rendering of "posit that tomatoes are fruits"?
0
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1answer
234 views

What is the meaning of the word “matches”? [closed]

I am studying regular expressions. A regular expression is a pattern that you can match in a text. In books, I often read things like the period . matches any single character. What is the ...
2
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1answer
53 views

He happened + infin

I happened to see... In sentences like this, is the infinitive the object of happen? Can happen be transitive?
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2answers
125 views

Is “ran after” a phrasal verb?

I'm having some difficulty parsing this sentence: "The old beggar ran after the rich man." Is the verb "ran" (intransitive) with no object, or is it "ran after" (transitive) with the object ...
0
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1answer
116 views

Is it VL (Linking Verbs) or VT (Transitive Verbs)?

Federal Reserve remains patient about next U.S. rate hike. Is this sentence "linking verb" or "transitive verb"? I think it is VL but not quite sure about it.
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1answer
48 views

Usage of transitive verbs [closed]

Transitive verbs when used in active voice take a direct object,that is to say not preceded by a preposition.However,transitive verbs when used passively take the preposition - to,by or from.This may ...
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2answers
634 views

“I don't mistake” or “I don't make a mistake” Which one is correct? [closed]

I have a query about these sentences: If I do not mistake, she would be his fiancée ... but my teacher told me that it must be expressed in another way If I do not make a mistake, she ...
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3answers
15k views

“Pay rise” vs “pay raise”

Which sentence below is correct? Ben received a pay rise. Ben received a pay raise.
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7answers
2k views

What word describes the process of a ship being slowly “swallowed” in the sea?

Trying to find a word which will describe the slow process of the absorption of a ship by the sea. Metaphysical words are also welcome. Sea water swallowed the ship.
1
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1answer
220 views

“Informing” — Gerund instead of Verb+Object?

I think if we take informing as a noun in this sentence, it should be fine. What are your views on the grammaticality of the following sentence? He left me without informing.
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2answers
147 views

Does “sell” have a direct object in “This is the car that Peter wants to sell”?

For the following sentence, I can identify "This car" as the direct object of the verb "sell". Peter wants to sell this car. However, if the sentence is changed as follows, does the verb "sell" ...
2
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1answer
113 views

“Find” as a transitive verb

I know that in this example I find it quite hard to do something the verb "to find" must be followed by the pronoun "it". But what if I say One thing I found "it" to get used to doing is… ...
3
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2answers
238 views

Intransitive use of the verb “reduce”

I know that the verb “reduce”, which is often followed by an object, can also be used intransitively, as dictionaries show very clearly. What I am unsure of, however, is whether “reduce” could ...
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2answers
2k views

What are the meanings of the sentences where “Not that” is followed by an object-missing expression?

According to my observation, there are at least two types of using "Not that....". And my question is: what does "not that" mean in its second type of usage? In the first usage, "not that" is ...
3
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2answers
431 views

Is “fished” a transitive verb in “I fished around in my pocket for my keys”?

In English it doesn't sound natural to say "I fished a fish." You would say "I caught a fish." However, in the instances where I can think of using fish as a verb, it must take a preposition (around, ...
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4answers
97 views

Validity of “a million people had evacuated”

I find something wrong with the grammar below from a BBC report. Around a million people had evacuated from vulnerable areas in the south, though many are now heading home. Should it not be a ...
3
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2answers
794 views

Sit v. sit down

I seriously cannot find any good, thorough responses to this question, and I'm trying to help out a non-native friend. Sit down implies motion. I understand that because of the preposition "down". ...
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5answers
3k views

Can the phrase 'is contained in' be substituted by a single word?

If a lunchbox contains an apple, then the apple is contained in a lunchbox. Is it possible to replace the phrase 'is contained in' with a single word? I can't think of one, and the thesaurus hasn't ...
4
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4answers
1k views

How can I use “fête” as a verb in active voice?

Oxford Dictionaries cites a verb as an entry for fête and gives a passive example. How can I use fête in the active voice? For example, can one fête an occasion with pomp and circumstance?
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3answers
578 views

Ambiguous transitive verb whose meaning is determined by its subject

I am looking for an example of a transitive verb with an ambiguous meaning that is determined by its subject. To explain what I mean, here is an example of a transitive verb whose meaning is ...
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2answers
20k views

Can “itch” be a transitive verb, i.e., can an itch be itched?

Can itch be used as a transitive verb? In other words, can you itch an itch as you would scratch an itch? Dictionaries differ, with the bigger hitters saying no. Are they bearing the proper standard ...
3
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2answers
2k views

Is “Now I lay me down to sleep” grammatical?

This is in a song I’ve heard. Is it grammatically correct?
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1answer
5k views

Usage of “booked on” “booked in” and “booked for”?

Which usage is correct in terms of booking a room/course/session? "booked on a room/course/session" "booked in a room/course/session" "booked for a room/course/session" Googling it, I ...
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1answer
279 views

Can an object after transitive verb be omitted in some cases?

I feel very confused at this question. It may be split into 2 questions. A. Must a transitive verb always be follow by an object? B. If NO is the answer to Q A. , then under what circumstances the ...
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4answers
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Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.
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3answers
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“Elaborate” as a transitive verb?

It is common to speak of "elaborating on (or upon) a topic." However, I have been told that this is appropriate only when some explanation has already been given; if no information is yet known, then ...
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1answer
673 views

Is “reduce” transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb reduce used incorrectly in the sentence below? Would you personally choose to replace reduce with an alternative such as drop or fall? The birth rate has reduced over the past 10 ...
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3answers
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“Let's” vs. “lets”: which is correct?

Say I'm promoting a product. Which is correct? [Product] let's you [do something awesome]. [Product] lets you [do something awesome]. Or neither?
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2answers
562 views

How do you differentiate between a transitive verb and a noun?

I have several components in a piece of software I am working with and we want to select names that are nouns which describe the components. We have the following names: Automation Retrieval ...
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4answers
3k views
4
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3answers
239 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
4
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3answers
287 views

What is wrong with phrasing like “configure how”?

I'm doing some editing and one sentence I'm navigating says "You can configure how the thing appears." (That's a paraphrase.) I think it is wrong because "configure" is a transitive verb and needs a ...
3
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1answer
8k views

“Comment on something” or “comment something”?

Do I say “comment on something” or simply “comment something”? For example: Brian ?commented on this video. Brian ?commented this video
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1answer
212 views

Transitive verb meaning “to author a strong and direct refutation of or response to”

Wiktionary defines polemic as: ​A strong verbal or written attack on someone or something. I need a verb that means "to write a polemic of". Anyone knows one?
0
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1answer
109 views

Transitive verb with 'as'

When I looked up the word hail in Longman Online Dictionary and Oxford Advanced Dictionary Online, I saw it has been marked as transitive verb. I also noticed by someone's note that a verb followed by ...
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2answers
333 views

Is the usage “To + transitive verb” following nothing else grammatically incorrect?

In the website HKNA, 5 transitive verbs are used: promote, conduct, disseminate, undertake, facilitate. Is such usage "To + transitive verb" grammatically incorrect?
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2answers
3k views

Is it “Seeking a bigger challenge” or “Seeking for a bigger challenge”?

Sometimes in a job application form, it asks you for the reason of leaving the previous company, and if the reason is to look for a bigger challenge, would it be Seeking a bigger challenge Seeking ...
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0answers
36 views

how to use the verb 'face' [duplicate]

This is one of the questions from SAT. Preserving rare and valuable books is one of the challenges facing the Librarian of Congress. My question is if the sentence above has no error. Isn't the ...
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2answers
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What's the difference between using the verb “change” transitively and intransitively?

I am confused about using transitive and intransitive verbs for making passive sentences. Especially when that verb can be both (like the verb change).
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2answers
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“Disappear” as a transitive verb

I hear it more on more frequently on the news, as in: The North Korean regime has disappeared scores of dissidents over the past twenty years. Has disappear always been used in such a way, as a ...