0
votes
4answers
204 views

“To search for something” versus “to look for something”: are these verbs synonyms? [closed]

Are the verb phrases "to search for something" and "to look for something" synonyms?
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Transitive verb meaning “to author a strong and direct refutation of or response to”

Wiktionary defines polemic as: ​A strong verbal or written attack on someone or something. I need a verb that means "to write a polemic of". Anyone knows one?
-1
votes
2answers
185 views

Is the usage “To + transitive verb” following nothing else grammatically incorrect?

In the website HKNA, 5 transitive verbs are used: promote, conduct, disseminate, undertake, facilitate. Is such usage "To + transitive verb" grammatically incorrect?
2
votes
5answers
440 views

Can the phrase 'is contained in' be substituted by a single word?

If a lunchbox contains an apple, then the apple is contained in a lunchbox. Is it possible to replace the phrase 'is contained in' with a single word? I can't think of one, and the thesaurus hasn't ...
0
votes
1answer
424 views

Meaning of “I command you for that” [closed]

I noticed this somewhere and I have no clue what it means, as I'm not a native speaker. Google hasn't helped out. Does anyone know what this means? (If you need additional context, let me know). I ...
2
votes
1answer
74 views

“trust the fact” vs. “trust to the fact”?

I think "trust the fact" is more natural than "trust to the fact", but the search result shows that the latter is more popular. What's the difference between them? Thanks. Yet another derived ...
3
votes
1answer
184 views

Framing with real evidence

Normally to frame somebody means 3 informal produce false evidence against (an innocent person) so that they appear guilty Now what in case of a cautious criminal who took care to hide/remove ...
2
votes
1answer
94 views

Is “grooving me” grammatical?

The context of the word groove here is musical groove. In youth slang of electronic music fans it means aesthetic pleasure while listening to music. Can I use groove as a transitive verb? As in, "X ...
2
votes
3answers
732 views

Water comprises/composes/combines/consists two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do you use what word to express that something consists of something else? Does a whole “compose” its parts? Correct use of “consist” Water ...
1
vote
4answers
485 views

Which is proper: “to debate X” or “to debate about X”?

Which version of this sentence is correct? Doctoral students about to graduate, like me, often debate about what qualities make a successful scientist. Doctoral students about to graduate, ...
3
votes
2answers
333 views

Can “intrude” be used transitively?

We can say "invade someone's privacy", but can the verb "intrude" be used in the same way without a preposition? As in, Don't intrude my privacy. Or should it be: Don't intrude into my ...
-2
votes
4answers
232 views

To retroactively create?

Is there a verb that means "retroactively create"? For example: John wanted to retroactively create a relationship with his estranged father. I'm not looking for a word that means ...
6
votes
2answers
370 views

Why are “indemnify” and “condemn” spelled differently?

Comparing the words indemnify and condemn: Both contain demn as a root Both are transitive verbs Why is one spelled differently from the other – why not indemn, or condemnify?
5
votes
1answer
502 views

Is there a word for a verb which requires an adverb or prep. phrase in order to make sense?

Put is the one I'm thinking of. It is always transitive, but even with a direct object, it still makes no sense without an adverb or prepositional phrase. I put it somewhere. I put it on the ...
5
votes
3answers
5k views

“Elaborate” as a transitive verb?

It is common to speak of "elaborating on (or upon) a topic." However, I have been told that this is appropriate only when some explanation has already been given; if no information is yet known, then ...
0
votes
2answers
4k views

Is “injur” a word? [closed]

Am I going crazy? I think "injur" must be a transitive verb meaning "to cause injury to," as in "the flying debris might injur the bystanders." Yet when I google around and check online ...
5
votes
2answers
9k views

Can “itch” be a transitive verb, i.e., can an itch be itched?

Can itch be used as a transitive verb? In other words, can you itch an itch as you would scratch an itch? Dictionaries differ, with the bigger hitters saying no. Are they bearing the proper standard ...
2
votes
3answers
19k views

“Email me” and “mail to me”

Why is it correct to say "email me", whereas with the word mail we say/write "mail to me"?
7
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “raise” and “rise”?

What is the difference between raise and rise? When and how should I use each one?
15
votes
3answers
20k views

“Let's” vs. “lets”: which is correct?

Say I'm promoting a product. Which is correct? [Product] let's you [do something awesome]. [Product] lets you [do something awesome]. Or neither?