Tagged Questions

Transitive verbs require an object; they are not complete without a direct object.

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3answers
332 views

Intransitive verbs with preposition in passive sentences

The words listen, shout, etc. are intransitive verbs, but why are they used in passive sentences with preposition to, at, etc.? e.g: she was never listened to. I don’t like to be shouted at. ...
2
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3answers
186 views

Ambiguous transitive verb whose meaning is determined by its subject

I am looking for an example of a transitive verb with an ambiguous meaning that is determined by its subject. To explain what I mean, here is an example of a transitive verb whose meaning is ...
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1answer
78 views

Can an object after transitive verb be omitted in some cases?

I feel very confused at this question. It may be split into 2 questions. A. Must a transitive verb always be follow by an object? B. If NO is the answer to Q A. , then under what circumstances the ...
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4answers
172 views

Why is “look” transitive in “look you in the eye”?

Why is look used as a transitive verb in the phrase look you in the eye? I checked look in Cambridge Dictionaries and found only an intransitive look, not a transitive one.
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4answers
867 views

“To search for something” versus “to look for something”: are these verbs synonyms? [closed]

Are the verb phrases "to search for something" and "to look for something" synonyms?
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1answer
224 views

Is “reduce” transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb reduce used incorrectly in the sentence below? Would you personally choose to replace reduce with an alternative such as drop or fall? The birth rate has reduced over the past 10 ...
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2answers
92 views

Does “sell” have a direct object in “This is the car that Peter wants to sell”?

For the below sentence, I can identify "This car" as the direct object of the verb "sell". Peter wants to sell this car. However, if the sentence is changed as follows, does the verb "sell" ...
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1answer
153 views

Transitive verb meaning “to author a strong and direct refutation of or response to”

Wiktionary defines polemic as: ​A strong verbal or written attack on someone or something. I need a verb that means "to write a polemic of". Anyone knows one?
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1answer
73 views

Transitive verb with 'as'

When I looked up the word hail in Longman Online Dictionary and Oxford Advanced Dictionary Online, I saw it has been marked as transitive verb. I also noticed by someone's note that a verb followed by ...
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2answers
243 views

Is the usage “To + transitive verb” following nothing else grammatically incorrect?

In the website HKNA, 5 transitive verbs are used: promote, conduct, disseminate, undertake, facilitate. Is such usage "To + transitive verb" grammatically incorrect?
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0answers
36 views

how to use the verb 'face' [duplicate]

This is one of the questions from SAT. Preserving rare and valuable books is one of the challenges facing the Librarian of Congress. My question is if the sentence above has no error. Isn't the ...
2
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5answers
927 views

Can the phrase 'is contained in' be substituted by a single word?

If a lunchbox contains an apple, then the apple is contained in a lunchbox. Is it possible to replace the phrase 'is contained in' with a single word? I can't think of one, and the thesaurus hasn't ...
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1answer
1k views

Usage of “booked on” “booked in” and “booked for”?

Which usage is correct in terms of booking a room/course/session? "booked on a room/course/session" "booked in a room/course/session" "booked for a room/course/session" Googling it, I ...
4
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3answers
223 views

“The same X” and intransitive verbs

As I have had explained to me at great length, wonder is intransitive. That's fine, but it can seem to take an object: Jim: Yesterday I wondered what that mark on the wall was made by Dave: I ...
7
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2answers
699 views

“Disappear” as a transitive verb

I hear it more on more frequently on the news, as in: The North Korean regime has disappeared scores of dissidents over the past twenty years. Has disappear always been used in such a way, as a ...
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1answer
707 views

Meaning of “I command you for that” [closed]

I noticed this somewhere and I have no clue what it means, as I'm not a native speaker. Google hasn't helped out. Does anyone know what this means? (If you need additional context, let me know). I ...
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3answers
1k views

Why “answer me” but not “answer me the question”?

Why are "answer me" and "answer the question" acceptable but not "answer me the question"? Is it similar to "explain me (something)"?
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3answers
317 views

Is “get someone up” the same as “wake someone up”?

Is using get up in this expression correct? I am sorry I woke you up. I am sorry I got you up. I use get up for wake up all the time, but in this expression it sounds a bit odd.
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2answers
1k views

Can any transitive verb be accompanied by a preposition?

Galileo was forced to recant his assertion that the earth orbited the sun (Oxford Dictionary) Can one recant on an absence of belief? (The Secret Intensity of Everyday Life) The first ...
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2answers
902 views

What's the difference between using the verb “change” transitively and intransitively?

I am confused about using transitive and intransitive verbs for making passive sentences. Especially when that verb can be both (like the verb change).
2
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1answer
91 views

“trust the fact” vs. “trust to the fact”?

I think "trust the fact" is more natural than "trust to the fact", but the search result shows that the latter is more popular. What's the difference between them? Thanks. Yet another derived ...
2
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0answers
80 views

Placing the preposition [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to change the common structure in these phrasal verbs? I'm really confused about where to put the preposition. She cut her hair off. Vs She cut ...
3
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1answer
230 views

Framing with real evidence

Normally to frame somebody means 3 informal produce false evidence against (an innocent person) so that they appear guilty Now what in case of a cautious criminal who took care to hide/remove ...
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2answers
384 views

How do you differentiate between a transitive verb and a noun?

I have several components in a piece of software I am working with and we want to select names that are nouns which describe the components. We have the following names: Automation Retrieval ...
3
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3answers
135 views

“Run on an OS” vs. “run under an OS”

What is the correct way to specify the operating system you are targeting or using? Is a program running on or under an operating system (OS)? Is a machine running an OS or under an OS?
2
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2answers
491 views

Is it “Seeking a bigger challenge” or “Seeking for a bigger challenge”?

Sometimes in a job application form, it asks you for the reason of leaving the previous company, and if the reason is to look for a bigger challenge, would it be Seeking a bigger challenge Seeking ...
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1answer
161 views

“Partner you” vs. “partner with you”

Can I say for instance dynamic enough to partner you in facing new or must it be partner with you I'm specifically asking whether you can say partner you as opposed to partner with you. Here's an ...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

Is “grooving me” grammatical?

The context of the word groove here is musical groove. In youth slang of electronic music fans it means aesthetic pleasure while listening to music. Can I use groove as a transitive verb? As in, "X ...
2
votes
3answers
942 views

Water comprises/composes/combines/consists two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do you use what word to express that something consists of something else? Does a whole “compose” its parts? Correct use of “consist” Water ...
1
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4answers
631 views

Which is proper: “to debate X” or “to debate about X”?

Which version of this sentence is correct? Doctoral students about to graduate, like me, often debate about what qualities make a successful scientist. Doctoral students about to graduate, ...
4
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4answers
753 views

How can I use “fête” as a verb in active voice?

Oxford Dictionaries cites a verb as an entry for fête and gives a passive example. How can I use fête in the active voice? For example, can one fête an occasion with pomp and circumstance?
3
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1answer
4k views

“Comment on something” or “comment something”?

Do I say “comment on something” or simply “comment something”? For example: Brian ?commented on this video. Brian ?commented this video
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0answers
282 views

transitive vs intransitive verb [closed]

I'm not expert in English grammar, but I need to understand the difference between a transitive verb and an intransitive verb. Can someone explain this to me?
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3answers
524 views

Is “update” transitive or intransitive?

According to many dictionaries including merriam-webster, update is a transitive verb. So I expect the following sentence (used in Firefox) to be incorrect: Please wait while Firefox is updating. ...
0
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1answer
349 views

Is the verb 'let' transitive or intransitive?

Is the verb 'let', with the meaning 'to cause to', transitive or intransitive? E.g.: Do you want to go out for a pizza? Please let know. Is this allowed or is it misuse?
3
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2answers
478 views

Can “intrude” be used transitively?

We can say "invade someone's privacy", but can the verb "intrude" be used in the same way without a preposition? As in, Don't intrude my privacy. Or should it be: Don't intrude into my ...
1
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1answer
262 views

Acknowledges - transitive verb question

Is the following grammatically correct? Signing below acknowledges you agree with the terms. Or does it need to be: Signing below acknowledges that you agree with the terms. I can't think ...
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4answers
247 views

To retroactively create?

Is there a verb that means "retroactively create"? For example: John wanted to retroactively create a relationship with his estranged father. I'm not looking for a word that means ...
4
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1answer
241 views

“Have at it” : what's the object of the transitive verb “have” here?

I intuitively understand the meaning of the phrase "have at it!", but I can't explain it to myself. I understand that "to have" in this sense requires an object to be valid, so why is it missing here ...
2
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2answers
555 views

“Forward” as transitive verb

When casually writing email I find myself using forward like this: I forwarded him the email with your info. Is the above version grammatically correct? I forwarded the email with your info ...
6
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2answers
456 views

Why are “indemnify” and “condemn” spelled differently?

Comparing the words indemnify and condemn: Both contain demn as a root Both are transitive verbs Why is one spelled differently from the other – why not indemn, or condemnify?
5
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1answer
648 views

Is there a word for a verb which requires an adverb or prep. phrase in order to make sense?

Put is the one I'm thinking of. It is always transitive, but even with a direct object, it still makes no sense without an adverb or prepositional phrase. I put it somewhere. I put it on the ...
8
votes
3answers
7k views

“Elaborate” as a transitive verb?

It is common to speak of "elaborating on (or upon) a topic." However, I have been told that this is appropriate only when some explanation has already been given; if no information is yet known, then ...
3
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2answers
1k views

Is “Now I lay me down to sleep” grammatical?

This is in a song I’ve heard. Is it grammatically correct?
8
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4answers
761 views

Can “shop” (related to selling or stores) be used as a transitive verb?

How is shop used as a transitive verb? The only transitive meanings I can find are reporting someone to police or Photoshopping an image. I found one discussion about transitive 'shop', centered on ...
0
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2answers
4k views

Is “injur” a word? [closed]

Am I going crazy? I think "injur" must be a transitive verb meaning "to cause injury to," as in "the flying debris might injur the bystanders." Yet when I google around and check online ...
4
votes
3answers
237 views

What is wrong with phrasing like “configure how”?

I'm doing some editing and one sentence I'm navigating says "You can configure how the thing appears." (That's a paraphrase.) I think it is wrong because "configure" is a transitive verb and needs a ...
5
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2answers
13k views

Can “itch” be a transitive verb, i.e., can an itch be itched?

Can itch be used as a transitive verb? In other words, can you itch an itch as you would scratch an itch? Dictionaries differ, with the bigger hitters saying no. Are they bearing the proper standard ...
4
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2answers
613 views

What are the meanings of the sentences where “Not that” is followed by an object-missing expression?

According to my observation, there are at least two types of using "Not that....". And my question is: what does "not that" mean in its second type of usage? In the first usage, "not that" is ...
5
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3answers
6k views

“Pay rise” vs “pay raise”

Which sentence below is correct? Ben received a pay rise. Ben received a pay raise.