2
votes
1answer
403 views

“Open to opportunities” vs. “open for opportunities”

I want to know which sentence is correct and why: I'm open to new opportunities. I'm open for new opportunities.
0
votes
1answer
57 views

“These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research” [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the ...
1
vote
2answers
146 views

'quoted to you' or 'quoted for you'?

Which is correct? The price we quoted for you or The price we quoted to you I often stumble with this. I'm not sure how to use for you and to you.
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

“Critical in” vs. “critical for” vs. “critical to” [closed]

I am confused about the correct preposition to use before achieving in this sentence: Tracking service delivery is critical in achieving the goals of the health program. I feel "critical for ...
3
votes
2answers
909 views

“Left as an exercise for the reader” vs. “to the reader”

I think the most common is "X is left as an exercise for the reader", but it looks like both are in use. Is the "to" variant correct? If not, why?
2
votes
1answer
6k views

“She did not report for work” vs. “she did not report to work”

Which of the two is grammatical or is better in style — "report for work" or "report to work"? I've always used the first, "report for work", following the pattern of "report for duty", which I ...
0
votes
1answer
867 views

“Questions to” or “Questions for”? [closed]

I am writing a list of questions to be asked in an interview, and was wondering about the title of my list. Is it supposed to be called "Questions to Artists" or "Questions for Artists"? What is the ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Surprising to” vs. “surprising for”

Should I say "one thing is quite surprising to me" or "one thing is quite surprising for me" in the sentence below? I've read your article. I am not going to say it's completely dud, don't ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Key to” vs. “key for”

Key to exercises. Today I saw the quoted sentence when looking at the keys to exercises, and afterwards that sentence got me thinking why the preposition to is used here instead of for. The ...
5
votes
1answer
14k views

“Answer to the question” vs. “answer for the question” vs. “answer of the question”

The answer to the question. The answer for the question. The answer of the question. Which is grammatical? What are the differences? And what is the preferred usage?
1
vote
3answers
327 views

“To some” vs. “for some”

Are "for some" and "to some" interchangable? To some the sun appears brighter in the afternoons. My natural instinct is to use "for some" in that sentence, but I don't understand why "to some" ...
6
votes
1answer
7k views

“Suited to” vs. “suited for”

Is there a difference between suited to and suited for? For example, Japan is suited for agriculture. Agriculture is suited to Japan. In my above examples, can I interchange for with to? I ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

“Available jobs to/for them”

First of all, English is not my first language. I have a question, maybe a basic one, about this phrase: The situation highlights the mismatch between some areas of training and available jobs ...
5
votes
2answers
26k views

“leave to” or “leave for”

Which of the following is correct? I am leaving for London. I am leaving to London. I have always thought the first one is correct till I came across the name of this painting.
4
votes
1answer
23k views

“Relevant to” vs. “relevant for”

Is there a rule to decide which is better: relevant to or relevant for? One is accusative and one dative but that doesn't really help me.
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“Solution for” vs. “solution to” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Solution for” or “solution to” a problem? My problematic phrase is this: More and more patients from other states and countries sought here ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

“Reschedule to” or “reschedule for”?

Would you like me to re-schedule to today instead? Would you like me to re-schedule for today instead?
7
votes
3answers
10k views

“Approach to” or “approach for”

When do you use approach for, and when do you use approach to? (How can I answer questions like this? In which dictionaries should I look? How do I google it?) The reason to ask this question is ...
4
votes
1answer
794 views

What preposition do I use — on, to, for, — when writing “stand for election” for a group?

Hopefully this is a simple question, although possibly too simple for this site - if so I apologise! Which, if any, are acceptable phrases: ...stand for election on a place on the group ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

“Stressful to” vs. “stressful for”

Which preposition, for or to, is correct in below sentence? It is less stressful [for/to] a child than an adult to learn a foreign language.
3
votes
3answers
17k views

Proper use of “out to lunch”, “out for lunch” and “out at lunch”

Recently a co-worker and I debated the proper use of "out to lunch". The argument stemmed from conversation over the appropriate preposition to use, and became particularly heated when we tried to ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

“Prerequisite for” vs. “prerequisite to”

When is it appropriate to use "prerequisite for" instead of "prerequisite to"? Does it depend on context, or is it a matter of style? I googled the two phrases and found 4.5 million hits for ...
12
votes
3answers
48k views

“Solution for” or “solution to” a problem?

I need to find a solution to/for this problem. Can to and for be used interchangeably here? Is one of them just plain wrong?
8
votes
4answers
187k views

Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?

Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?
7
votes
1answer
4k views

When to use “to” and when “for”?

Examples: It is important to me. It will be good for you. This sounds stupid to me. I'll make it comfortable for you. I'll make it available to you. Any rules here, dear native ...
5
votes
1answer
25k views

Is there a difference between “for this purpose” and “to this purpose”?

Is there a difference between these two expressions and should one of them be preferred?
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Which is correct: “it's not a big deal to me” or “it's not a big deal for me”?

What is the correct way to say it? It's not a big deal to me. It's not a big deal for me. Also, should I use "it's not" or "it's no"?
8
votes
5answers
17k views

Expressing an opinion: to me or for me?

Which one should be used? To me, it makes no difference, but I'm not really sure why. vs For me, it makes no difference, but I'm not really sure why.