-1
votes
2answers
521 views

“Critical in” vs. “critical for” vs. “critical to” [closed]

I am confused about the correct preposition to use before achieving in this sentence: Tracking service delivery is critical in achieving the goals of the health program. I feel "critical for ...
3
votes
2answers
776 views

“Left as an exercise for the reader” vs. “to the reader”

I think the most common is "X is left as an exercise for the reader", but it looks like both are in use. Is the "to" variant correct? If not, why?
0
votes
1answer
507 views

Departed to vs Departed for

Which of the following is more grammatically correct? Could you let me know reason for using the favourable preposition (either to or for)? After having my dinner, I will depart to my house. ...
2
votes
2answers
200 views

Solution of/to/for equation

A recent question to when to use of and when for/to for solution suggested that of appears only in context of chemistry, and the word means something very different then. But I recalled almost ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Surprising to” vs. “surprising for”

Should I say "one thing is quite surprising to me" or "one thing is quite surprising for me" in the sentence below? I've read your article. I am not going to say it's completely dud, don't ...
5
votes
1answer
9k views

“Answer to the question” vs. “answer for the question” vs. “answer of the question”

The answer to the question. The answer for the question. The answer of the question. Which is grammatical? What are the differences? And what is the preferred usage?
1
vote
3answers
279 views

“To some” vs. “for some”

Are "for some" and "to some" interchangable? To some the sun appears brighter in the afternoons. My natural instinct is to use "for some" in that sentence, but I don't understand why "to some" ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

“Available jobs to/for them”

First of all, English is not my first language. I have a question, maybe a basic one, about this phrase: The situation highlights the mismatch between some areas of training and available jobs ...
5
votes
2answers
23k views

“leave to” or “leave for”

Which of the following is correct? I am leaving for London. I am leaving to London. I have always thought the first one is correct till I came across the name of this painting.
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“Solution for” vs. “solution to” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Solution for” or “solution to” a problem? My problematic phrase is this: More and more patients from other states and countries sought here ...
5
votes
3answers
8k views

“Approach to” or “approach for”

When do you use approach for, and when do you use approach to? (How can I answer questions like this? In which dictionaries should I look? How do I google it?) The reason to ask this question is ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

“Stressful to” vs. “stressful for”

Which preposition, for or to, is correct in below sentence? It is less stressful [for/to] a child than an adult to learn a foreign language.
3
votes
3answers
14k views

Proper use of “out to lunch”, “out for lunch” and “out at lunch”

Recently a co-worker and I debated the proper use of "out to lunch". The argument stemmed from conversation over the appropriate preposition to use, and became particularly heated when we tried to ...
11
votes
3answers
39k views

“Solution for” or “solution to” a problem?

I need to find a solution to/for this problem. Can to and for be used interchangeably here? Is one of them just plain wrong?
8
votes
4answers
161k views

Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?

Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Which is correct: “it's not a big deal to me” or “it's not a big deal for me”?

What is the correct way to say it? It's not a big deal to me. It's not a big deal for me. Also, should I use "it's not" or "it's no"?