1
vote
0answers
33 views

The difference between “to someone” and “for someone” [duplicate]

To many people, we are the scariest animals in the world. For me, English is the easiest of all subjects. Why does the former sentence use "to" someone and the latter use "for" someone? ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“For clarity” vs. “To make clear” [closed]

Compare: "He modified the sentence for clarity." vs "He modified the sentence to make it clear." Any difference here?
0
votes
1answer
682 views

“Questions to” or “Questions for”? [closed]

I am writing a list of questions to be asked in an interview, and was wondering about the title of my list. Is it supposed to be called "Questions to Artists" or "Questions for Artists"? What is the ...
1
vote
3answers
279 views

“To some” vs. “for some”

Are "for some" and "to some" interchangable? To some the sun appears brighter in the afternoons. My natural instinct is to use "for some" in that sentence, but I don't understand why "to some" ...
5
votes
2answers
23k views

“leave to” or “leave for”

Which of the following is correct? I am leaving for London. I am leaving to London. I have always thought the first one is correct till I came across the name of this painting.
5
votes
5answers
15k views

What is the difference between “heading to” and “heading for”?

What is the difference between to and for in the following statements? I am headed to the airport. I am headed for the airport.
5
votes
3answers
8k views

“Approach to” or “approach for”

When do you use approach for, and when do you use approach to? (How can I answer questions like this? In which dictionaries should I look? How do I google it?) The reason to ask this question is ...
8
votes
3answers
6k views

Rule for using “for” vs. “to”

A Brazilian friend speaks English very well, but has a very unique habit: it seems often that she needs to use "for" but she instead uses "to", and vice-versa. For instance: The present is to ...