Questions about choosing between the prepositions "to" and "for".

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-1
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0answers
13 views

Use A to do B VS Use A for doing B [duplicate]

Which one(s) of the following is(are) the correct way(s) of making sentences where the verb TO USE is used to indicate the purpose of the object in active sentences as in 1) and 2) or the purpose of ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

“Relevant for” or “Relevant to”? [duplicate]

Which is the correct preposition for expressing relevance? Should one say So relevant for our lives today, what .... has to say regarding.... or should one say: So relevant to our lives ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

“Something to the rescue!” vs “Something for the rescue” — which one is correct?

I was wondering which one of the following constructions below is grammatically correct? Or both are acceptable? Something to the rescue! Something for the rescue!
16
votes
4answers
976 views

Saying something is “for real” vs just saying something is “real”

I have a silly question that's been stuck in my head for a little bit. There was a movie that came out a little while ago called, "Heaven is for real" ... and something about the word "for" in that ...
2
votes
1answer
428 views

“Open to opportunities” vs. “open for opportunities”

I want to know which sentence is correct and why: I'm open to new opportunities. I'm open for new opportunities.
0
votes
1answer
59 views

“These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research” [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the ...
1
vote
2answers
149 views

'quoted to you' or 'quoted for you'?

Which is correct? The price we quoted for you or The price we quoted to you I often stumble with this. I'm not sure how to use for you and to you.
1
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2answers
1k views

Is it correct to use the phrase “pay attention” with “that”?

Is it correct to say "Pay attention that..."? or must I use "Pay attention to..." For example: "An attention should be paid that this is a one-way street".
0
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1answer
79 views

Questions “for chapter” or “to chapter”?

I always have a hard time in these cases: to choose for or to. Suppose I want to make a list of questions and as a headline I would like to name it something like: Questions for chapter 2. Is that ...
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

“Critical in” vs. “critical for” vs. “critical to” [closed]

I am confused about the correct preposition to use before achieving in this sentence: Tracking service delivery is critical in achieving the goals of the health program. I feel "critical for ...
0
votes
1answer
363 views

“Developed to [infinitive]” vs. “developed for [gerund]” [duplicate]

I am confused about when to use "to verb" and when to use "for verb+ing" constructs. For example what would be the proper construct for the following sentences extracted from scientific journals: ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

The difference between “to someone” and “for someone” [duplicate]

To many people, we are the scariest animals in the world. For me, English is the easiest of all subjects. Why does the former sentence use "to" someone and the latter use "for" someone? ...
0
votes
1answer
343 views

“for someone to do something” in the beginning of a sentence

For people to change their minds, first, the Church needed to.... is this a correct usage? what i am trying to say is people will change their minds if the Church does but the Church's changing ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“For clarity” vs. “To make clear” [closed]

Compare: "He modified the sentence for clarity." vs "He modified the sentence to make it clear." Any difference here?
1
vote
4answers
350 views

A letter to/for Jason?

Suppose Jason were at home and a mail carrier came to his front door with a letter addressed to Jason. Which of the following is correct? It was a letter for Jason. It was a letter to Jason.
3
votes
2answers
915 views

“Left as an exercise for the reader” vs. “to the reader”

I think the most common is "X is left as an exercise for the reader", but it looks like both are in use. Is the "to" variant correct? If not, why?
0
votes
1answer
639 views

Departed to vs Departed for

Which of the following is more grammatically correct? Could you let me know reason for using the favourable preposition (either to or for)? After having my dinner, I will depart to my house. ...
2
votes
2answers
282 views

Solution of/to/for equation

A recent question to when to use of and when for/to for solution suggested that of appears only in context of chemistry, and the word means something very different then. But I recalled almost ...
2
votes
1answer
6k views

“She did not report for work” vs. “she did not report to work”

Which of the two is grammatical or is better in style — "report for work" or "report to work"? I've always used the first, "report for work", following the pattern of "report for duty", which I ...
0
votes
1answer
878 views

“Questions to” or “Questions for”? [closed]

I am writing a list of questions to be asked in an interview, and was wondering about the title of my list. Is it supposed to be called "Questions to Artists" or "Questions for Artists"? What is the ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“Surprising to” vs. “surprising for”

Should I say "one thing is quite surprising to me" or "one thing is quite surprising for me" in the sentence below? I've read your article. I am not going to say it's completely dud, don't ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

Using “to” versus “for” between two nouns (“key to success”)

Another user provided an example and I have added others: Key to exercise Key for exercise Answer to a problem Answer for a problem Bullet to a gun Bullet for a gun She bought ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Key to” vs. “key for”

Key to exercises. Today I saw the quoted sentence when looking at the keys to exercises, and afterwards that sentence got me thinking why the preposition to is used here instead of for. The ...
5
votes
1answer
14k views

“Answer to the question” vs. “answer for the question” vs. “answer of the question”

The answer to the question. The answer for the question. The answer of the question. Which is grammatical? What are the differences? And what is the preferred usage?
1
vote
3answers
329 views

“To some” vs. “for some”

Are "for some" and "to some" interchangable? To some the sun appears brighter in the afternoons. My natural instinct is to use "for some" in that sentence, but I don't understand why "to some" ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Grammar: For vs to? [closed]

In my mother tongue both for and to have the same meaning, therefore it is hard for (is it being correctly used here?) me to know when I should use one instead of the other. After some google's ...
6
votes
1answer
7k views

“Suited to” vs. “suited for”

Is there a difference between suited to and suited for? For example, Japan is suited for agriculture. Agriculture is suited to Japan. In my above examples, can I interchange for with to? I ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

“Available jobs to/for them”

First of all, English is not my first language. I have a question, maybe a basic one, about this phrase: The situation highlights the mismatch between some areas of training and available jobs ...
5
votes
2answers
26k views

“leave to” or “leave for”

Which of the following is correct? I am leaving for London. I am leaving to London. I have always thought the first one is correct till I came across the name of this painting.
4
votes
1answer
23k views

“Relevant to” vs. “relevant for”

Is there a rule to decide which is better: relevant to or relevant for? One is accusative and one dative but that doesn't really help me.
6
votes
5answers
23k views

What is the difference between “heading to” and “heading for”?

What is the difference between to and for in the following statements? I am headed to the airport. I am headed for the airport.
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“Solution for” vs. “solution to” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Solution for” or “solution to” a problem? My problematic phrase is this: More and more patients from other states and countries sought here ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

“Reschedule to” or “reschedule for”?

Would you like me to re-schedule to today instead? Would you like me to re-schedule for today instead?
7
votes
3answers
10k views

“Approach to” or “approach for”

When do you use approach for, and when do you use approach to? (How can I answer questions like this? In which dictionaries should I look? How do I google it?) The reason to ask this question is ...
4
votes
1answer
798 views

What preposition do I use — on, to, for, — when writing “stand for election” for a group?

Hopefully this is a simple question, although possibly too simple for this site - if so I apologise! Which, if any, are acceptable phrases: ...stand for election on a place on the group ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

“Stressful to” vs. “stressful for”

Which preposition, for or to, is correct in below sentence? It is less stressful [for/to] a child than an adult to learn a foreign language.
3
votes
3answers
17k views

Proper use of “out to lunch”, “out for lunch” and “out at lunch”

Recently a co-worker and I debated the proper use of "out to lunch". The argument stemmed from conversation over the appropriate preposition to use, and became particularly heated when we tried to ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

“Prerequisite for” vs. “prerequisite to”

When is it appropriate to use "prerequisite for" instead of "prerequisite to"? Does it depend on context, or is it a matter of style? I googled the two phrases and found 4.5 million hits for ...
12
votes
3answers
48k views

“Solution for” or “solution to” a problem?

I need to find a solution to/for this problem. Can to and for be used interchangeably here? Is one of them just plain wrong?
8
votes
4answers
188k views

Which one is correct, “best wishes to you” or “best wishes for you”?

Which one is correct, "best wishes to you" or "best wishes for you"?
7
votes
1answer
5k views

When to use “to” and when “for”?

Examples: It is important to me. It will be good for you. This sounds stupid to me. I'll make it comfortable for you. I'll make it available to you. Any rules here, dear native ...
5
votes
1answer
25k views

Is there a difference between “for this purpose” and “to this purpose”?

Is there a difference between these two expressions and should one of them be preferred?
2
votes
2answers
6k views

Which is correct: “it's not a big deal to me” or “it's not a big deal for me”?

What is the correct way to say it? It's not a big deal to me. It's not a big deal for me. Also, should I use "it's not" or "it's no"?
9
votes
3answers
7k views

Rule for using “for” vs. “to”

A Brazilian friend speaks English very well, but has a very unique habit: it seems often that she needs to use "for" but she instead uses "to", and vice-versa. For instance: The present is to ...
15
votes
3answers
6k views

“In order to…”, “To…” or “For…”

What preposition should we use to start a sentence where we first explain a purpose and then a method to achieve it? Example 1 Purpose = pass the exams Method = study a lot In order to pass the ...
8
votes
5answers
17k views

Expressing an opinion: to me or for me?

Which one should be used? To me, it makes no difference, but I'm not really sure why. vs For me, it makes no difference, but I'm not really sure why.
14
votes
2answers
2k views

How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive?

As a native speaker of English, the gerund version of this sentence sounds better: infinitive: When used together in chains, extension methods are an unprecedented tool to produce extremely ...