Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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3
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2answers
103 views

What to call the time from “midnight to sunset”?

In many religious calendars, the day goes from sunset to sunset. When translating to the civil calendar, you can divide that day into two parts: from sunset to midnight (A), and from midnight to the ...
1
vote
2answers
43 views

“5 min after” vs. “at 5 min after”

I read the following sentence in Nature: The second test of cocaine seeking was a cue-induced reinstatement test conducted 5 min after the last of the extinction sessions. Would it be correct ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

Is there a word for “near in time” (both past & future) that doesn't also imply geographical proximity?

I'm currently writing a program that finds the "nearest sensible job", in terms of time. The only problem is that that phrase could also mean that the program is finding the nearest geographical job. ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

between (year) and (year), by which time

"In a study in the Bahamas, lionfish abundance was found to have increased rapidly between 2004 and 2010, by which time lionfish accounted for nearly 40% of the total predator biomass in the system." ...
0
votes
1answer
78 views

“You've been living here [for] too long”

Is it correct to say "You've been living here for too long"? Or is it better to drop the for? "You've been living here too long." Is either preferrable over the other for some reason?
-1
votes
1answer
96 views

Writing deadlines

I'm currently using the following date format for setting deadlines: Monday, 27 January 2014, 3 PM My questions are: Should I mention time at the beginning or leave it at the end? Should I ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Two questions - present progressive

I know that saying "I just saw her" is correct, but people also say "I've just arrived", so saying "I've just seen her" is also correct? Maybe it's a UK/US difference ? If it's correct, then "Just" ...