Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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1answer
27 views

Place is followed by time, but is it always? [on hold]

What I mean is: in a sentence like "I go to school in the city centre every morning." the place must always precede the time. I am looking at a sentence that says: "established in 2010 in London, ...
0
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1answer
74 views

Use of the present continuous to refer to timetabled events

One of the things that is constantly confusing for English language learners, but comes with ease to native speakers, is when to use present continuous and when to use present simple. Because of this,...
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3answers
40k views

When can I use “have a good day”? [closed]

I just want to ask if when would be the exact time to use have a good day? Because someone told me that the appropriate time would be in morning. Is that correct?
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3answers
8k views

Up to now vs until now [closed]

I want to say that something is currently completed, in a percentage. Which sentence is correct? Up to now the job has been completed by 10% or Until now the job has been completed by 10% ...
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1answer
47 views

An alternative term for 'lesser time'

I have two processes running with different speeds. In other words, one of them requires lesser time. I think 'Lesser time' is an awkward term. Is there any good alternative or synonym which I can use ...
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1answer
41 views

how to name on duration rules

I have a list of tasks, each happening between a start time and an end time. I want to sort all tasks into 3 categories: Upcoming ? Current happening ? pass ? already end ? What are the ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Deadlines as instants or periods with various verbs and tenses

I was wondering whether a deadline is more of an instant or more of a period. It seems to have some of both aspects, but with more of an emphasis on the instant. I thought that this should be ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Meaning of 'upon which' [migrated]

I am not a native English speaker. I read this phrase in a book, '... more beloved than everything UPON WHICH the sun rises,...' Could anyone clarify what this phrase means? And what is the meaning of ...
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4answers
1k views

“Within the past year” vs. “In the past year”

I'm having an argument with a co-worker about phrasing. We have a document that makes reference to someone having experience working "in the past year", and later it states "must have experience ...
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1answer
36 views

How to describe data changes over time?

I have a dataset, it has the problem that data changes overtime. In the pic above, the distribution is plotted every 5 years, and it could be seen that the distribution is not constant, it changes ...
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2answers
104 views

What is 1h16 as a time expression?

1Q16 is the first quarter 2016, then what is 1h16? I guess it's a expression for time. But I have no idea what it is.
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2answers
14k views

When someone leaves at 4pm - should I say “Have a good afternoon” or “evening”? [closed]

I started work as a receptionist and must greet people that come and go. Please let me know what I should say when it is 4 pm and the client is leaving. Should I say "Bye, have a nice afternoon" or "...
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1answer
24 views

What's the difference between “til 9.00” and “before 9.00”?

I was sent a text "I will be home til 9.00" and I understood it to mean before 9.00 but I can't explain how to use til, until, by or before. I thought til was used with negative words (I won't be home ...
3
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1answer
63 views

Why do we say “at H:MM,” but “on yyyy/mm/dd?”

This is not a duplicate of On vs At with date and time. Why do we say 'at' when referring to a clock-time, but 'on' when referring to a date, when they're just differently sized divisions of the ...
6
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3answers
6k views

'Tonight' and 'this evening'

If I ask Are you available tonight for a drink? does tonight refer to this evening and/or this night? If not, what would be considered the beginning of the night and the end of the evening? Do ...
65
votes
7answers
66k views

Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to?

At what point does next Tuesday mean the next Tuesday that will come to pass and no longer the Tuesday after the Tuesday that will come to pass? And, when does the meaning switch back?
2
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2answers
5k views

“each day” → “daily”; “every other day” →? [duplicate]

Is there an adjective that means "every other day"? I found "bidaily" but it seems to mean "twice a day", not "every second day" (not even both as "biweekly" does). I'd need this word to very ...
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10answers
3k views

What is “regional”, but relating to time instead of location?

You may describe something that's specific to an area as being regional - the set containing a thing specific to Wiltshire, something else specific to Brittany, and something else specific to Moray ...
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2answers
6k views

When did ironic use of “as in” start?

As far as I (as non-native speaker) understand the words as in, this is short for for instance, as in: Understanding “that” as in this statement It's my impression that at some point in time ...
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1answer
67 views

Using “some” to describe units of time

"some minutes, some years, some seconds" are grammatically incorrect. But "a few minutes, a few years, a few seconds" works. I'm trying to teach a non-native speaker this nuance but "it just sounds ...
1
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1answer
62 views

Term for past, present, and future classification of nouns

In a software program, I assign contracts a temporal classification as a past, current, or future agreement. I need a descriptive term for this classification and "temporal classification" seems ...
1
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1answer
30 views

“By time” versus “before time”

There is a related question here, but it's different because that relates to dates whereas I am talking about specific times. Compare the sentences "The assignment is due by 8:00am" and "The ...
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3answers
257 views

Is it “in” or “on the holidays”?

I'm unsure about the correct preposition of time regarding two sentences. This is the fist sentence in question: I'll call her ... the holidays. Possible solutions are at/in/on. I already ...
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3answers
3k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even "...
2
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3answers
107 views

Is “kudos” given someone for past events only — or does near-future work, too?

Is kudos to be used to wish somebody for only an event that happened to them in the past, or can you also use kudos for an event which is going to happen in the near future?
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2answers
14k views

best way to say the 24 hour time [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? Which words can be used to say time in 24 hour format? If, for instance, for 4:00 one might say "four o'clock", is it ...
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1answer
97 views

What does “a time that never was” mean?

Please explain what "a time that never was" means. The context: She glanced to the three who stood to one side of the King's throne, looking as though they'd stepped out of paintings from a time ...
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2answers
75k views

English notation for hour, minutes and seconds

I often see English notation about time using the " and ' symbols. I have always mistaken about the two, and even their meaning. I'm more used to "01:05:56", for example. How do you represent the ...
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2answers
42 views

Is there a phrase for the night before a weekday?

Sometimes I hear people say "I don't go out late on weeknights" when they mean Sunday through Thursday nights. Other times "weeknights" refers to Monday through Friday nights. Is there a less ...
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3answers
662 views

What do you call two consecutive months; a sixth of a year?

Half a year is a semester, i.e. (literally) 6 months. Since it’s often wrongly thought to derive from semi- ‘half’, there’re contradicting definitions of similar terms: Both a trimester and a (rare) ...
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3answers
173k views

What does “8/7c” mean?

I just saw an update on Facebook saying: Watch Russell present LIVE at the 42nd Annual NAACP Image Awards. Tonight at 8/7c on FOX. What does "8/7c" mean?
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9answers
33k views

Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise?

The period between sunrise and noon is called "morning", between noon and sunset is "afternoon". Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise? Edit/Clarification: Wikipedia defines ...
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2answers
73 views

Is there a word for “less-than-yearly”?

is there a single word to describe an indeterminate less-than-yearly frequency? Consider the following > A plan costs $100 annually. The user can choose to pay semi-annually, amounting to 2 ...
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2answers
122 views

How did English end up with names for days of the week like Monday, borrowed from latin but then also translated?

Learning about the origin of English names for days of the week, I found it it curious that some of them had an original meaning borrowed from Latin, but the words themselves were a translation. So ...
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2answers
88 views

Word for something that was once true and is no longer [closed]

Is there a word for something that was once true (maybe at the time it was said or written) but isn't true anymore? Either an adjective or a noun is fine. "Obsolete" is the best thing that I can ...
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2answers
261 views

Doing two things at once without conjuction

Are the following sentence, for two things going on at once, grammatically correct? Tom is doing laundry singing a song. It is not easy to go to school working part-time. I saw an accident riding my ...
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2answers
39 views

Use of “then” as “therefore” [closed]

I am confused about the following use of then: «I can't come to Bristol in the afternoon, sorry» «Let's meet around noon, then.» «I can't do it, I am sorry.» «Well, I'll do it, then!» I ...
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3answers
6k views

Is there any difference between “monthly average” and “average per month”? [closed]

I have trouble understanding if I should use "monthly average" or "average per month" when asking someone to calculate monthly average of a variable, e.g. heating expenses. Is there any difference, if ...
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1answer
55 views

“time” for instants or durations in science

I am trying to describe the evolution of a motion which is composed of smooth parts called "free flights" and instantaneous impacts. For example, consider a bouncing ball: its motion is a succession ...
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0answers
38 views

Lack of time *and* Time is precious [closed]

I'm certain that there exist a unique phrase that means both "Lack of time" and "Time is precious". When I try to remember what the phrase is, I'm constantly having the association of a precious ...
0
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0answers
56 views

Saying time out loud

I have read 24 hour time. How to say it? and How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? but they only cover part of my question. I'm wondering if there is a comprehensive set of rules that ...
6
votes
7answers
308 views

Idiom or phrase for “nickel-and-dime”ing your time?

I'm looking for a phrase for someone who is over-grasping with regards to minutes on their work time-sheet or other time accounting. Someone who will not only charge from the moment they walk in the ...
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votes
4answers
13k views

How do they express the time, in American and British English?

I don't know if this is a good question. But as far as I know, and as I do it, American English also say "after" other than "past" in expressing times. For example, a quarter after six instead of, a ...
2
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1answer
105 views

Common ways to tell the time

I'm a non-native speaker. In school, I was taught that the proper way of telling times in English is X o' clock. In NAE, would it be common to omit o' clock and just say something like: It's ...
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1answer
169 views

between (year) and (year), by which time

"In a study in the Bahamas, lionfish abundance was found to have increased rapidly between 2004 and 2010, by which time lionfish accounted for nearly 40% of the total predator biomass in the system." ...
0
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3answers
85 views

Would that be correct ? I finished eating at 7:30 AM. = I have eaten at 7:30 AM [closed]

Would that be correct ? I finished eating at 7:30 AM. = I have eaten at 7:30 AM.
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1answer
19 views

Time in conditional clause

I've gone through a lot of rules on conditional sentences in English and couldn't find the answer. What time should I use in the following comment to a source code? # Rebuild databases if '...
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0answers
32 views

Question on correct way to list time in a list

If I am using time in a list, do I need to write it out? Is this correct? We will leave at either 12:15, 1, 2:30, or 3:15.
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2answers
3k views

How are 24-hour (military) times read aloud?

I understand you read 2000 aloud as twenty hundred hours and 0000 as zero hours. How then do you read 0001 and 0010?
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2answers
59 views

At the time vs Of the time

Can anyone explain the difference between "at the time" vs "of the time"? For example: This did not quite fit the prevailing architectural schools at the time it was designed. This did not quite ...