Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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2
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3answers
4k views

Is there any difference between “monthly average” and “average per month”?

I have trouble understanding if I should use "monthly average" or "average per month" when asking someone to calculate monthly average of a variable, e.g. heating expenses. Is there any difference, if ...
1
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1answer
49 views

“time” for instants or durations in science

I am trying to describe the evolution of a motion which is composed of smooth parts called "free flights" and instantaneous impacts. For example, consider a bouncing ball: its motion is a succession ...
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0answers
22 views

Lack of time *and* Time is precious [on hold]

I'm certain that there exist a unique phrase that means both "Lack of time" and "Time is precious". When I try to remember what the phrase is, I'm constantly having the association of a precious ...
0
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0answers
23 views

Saying time out loud

I have read 24 hour time. How to say it? and How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? but they only cover part of my question. I'm wondering if there is a comprehensive set of rules that ...
6
votes
7answers
173 views

Idiom or phrase for “nickel-and-dime”ing your time?

I'm looking for a phrase for someone who is over-grasping with regards to minutes on their work time-sheet or other time accounting. Someone who will not only charge from the moment they walk in the ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Are the following sentences correct ?If the eating starts at 7:00 AM and finishes at 7:30 AM, and the time is now 7:20 AM [closed]

If the eating starts at 7:00 AM and finishes at 7:30 AM, and the time is now 7:20 AM. Are the following sentences correct ? I eat at 7:00 AM. I am eating now. I have eaten. I have eaten for 20 ...
4
votes
4answers
10k views

How do they express the time, in American and British English?

I don't know if this is a good question. But as far as I know, and as I do it, American English also say "after" other than "past" in expressing times. For example, a quarter after six instead of, a ...
2
votes
1answer
76 views

Common ways to tell the time

I'm a non-native speaker. In school, I was taught that the proper way of telling times in English is X o' clock. In NAE, would it be common to omit o' clock and just say something like: It's ...
0
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1answer
24 views

get or find/have free time or make the time? [closed]

Do "get" and "free time" make a frequent/natural combination instead of "have/find free time? Besides this, I wonder whether it means to have or to obtain. To my ear it's not common. Thank you
2
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2answers
70 views

Is “kudos” given someone for past events only — or does near-future work, too?

Is kudos to be used to wish somebody for only an event that happened to them in the past, or can you also use kudos for an event which is going to happen in the near future?
1
vote
1answer
135 views

between (year) and (year), by which time

"In a study in the Bahamas, lionfish abundance was found to have increased rapidly between 2004 and 2010, by which time lionfish accounted for nearly 40% of the total predator biomass in the system." ...
0
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2answers
46 views

Is there a word for “less-than-yearly”?

is there a single word to describe an indeterminate less-than-yearly frequency? Consider the following > A plan costs $100 annually. The user can choose to pay semi-annually, amounting to 2 ...
0
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3answers
52 views

Would that be correct ? I finished eating at 7:30 AM. = I have eaten at 7:30 AM [closed]

Would that be correct ? I finished eating at 7:30 AM. = I have eaten at 7:30 AM.
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Use of the present continuous to refer to timetabled events

One of the things that is constantly confusing for English language learners, but comes with ease to native speakers, is when to use present continuous and when to use present simple. Because of ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

Time in conditional clause

I've gone through a lot of rules on conditional sentences in English and couldn't find the answer. What time should I use in the following comment to a source code? # Rebuild databases if ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Deadlines as instants or periods with various verbs and tenses

I was wondering whether a deadline is more of an instant or more of a period. It seems to have some of both aspects, but with more of an emphasis on the instant. I thought that this should be ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

Question on correct way to list time in a list

If I am using time in a list, do I need to write it out? Is this correct? We will leave at either 12:15, 1, 2:30, or 3:15.
3
votes
2answers
3k views

How are 24-hour (military) times read aloud?

I understand you read 2000 aloud as twenty hundred hours and 0000 as zero hours. How then do you read 0001 and 0010?
2
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2answers
55 views

At the time vs Of the time

Can anyone explain the difference between "at the time" vs "of the time"? For example: This did not quite fit the prevailing architectural schools at the time it was designed. This did not quite ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

'Just now': past, future or both?

I only use it speaking of something that has just been done, i.e. in the very near past. I've finished washing the dishes just now. Can it be used also speaking of something that is about to be ...
2
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1answer
42 views

When exactly does “overnight on” certain day happen?

When somebody says for example "That will happen overnight on Wednesday", do they mean it will happen on the night between Tuesday and Wednesday, or between Wednesday and Thursday?
3
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2answers
4k views

“each day” → “daily”; “every other day” →?

Is there an adjective that means "every other day"? I found "bidaily" but it seems to mean "twice a day", not "every second day" (not even both as "biweekly" does). I'd need this word to very ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

How to input during an amount of time?

How do I correctly write someone has been doing this for this certain amount of time? For example: Next 30 years he wrote multiple books. or should I write it: He wrote multiple books in 30 ...
2
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1answer
40 views

How do I address a period of time in non-time units?

I need to say that something has been happening for several bus stops. What is the most natural way to do it?
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6answers
6k views

Is it correct to say “12:00am”?

I've read in various places the first minute of a day described as 12:00am. Now, whilst I personally prefer to use 24h clock notation and therefore don't have this problem as I can simply describe ...
-1
votes
1answer
55 views

What is the difference: in 10 minutes' time, in 10 minutes, after 10 minutes [duplicate]

For example, current time is 10:10. then when will the train leave? The train will leave in 10 minutes. The train will leave in 10 minutes' time. The train will leave after 10 minutes. If the ...
1
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1answer
47 views

Midnight semantics

I received an email with a discount code valid 'until Saturday midnight' but when I went to use it on Saturday lunchtime it had expired already, at 00:00 Saturday morning. My understanding was that ...
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2answers
20 views

About time presentation. The latest News should be restricted before 24 hours ago from current time?

I have a web service to provide News. But by the contract, I can only show the latest News before 24 hours ago. That is, if today is 2015-11-24, the news I provided should be before 2015-11-23 Can I ...
0
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1answer
58 views

Usage of am/pm with the past/to format

Which of the following sentences is more common? Are they both acceptable? It's twenty-five past seven am. It's seven twenty-five am. I wonder if the usage of am/pm is okay when using the past/to ...
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1answer
63 views

During + a time period (including a dash between two dates) [closed]

During 2000-2010 If I say it in English, should I say "during 2000 and 2010" or something else?
1
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1answer
54 views

Over vs during - difference in whether it lasts up to the present? [closed]

I have read the following: we use over when something last up to the present /or future/ and we use during for a definite period of time. So is this wrong? I worked in the company IBM over the ...
0
votes
2answers
229 views

Is “10 P.M. last night” redundant?

I know that it's redundant to say things like "8:00 A.M. in the morning" or "6:00 P.M. at night." But what if you want to specify that you're talking about a specific night, such as last night? For ...
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vote
1answer
245 views

Would “pentaminutely” reflect an event that occurs every five minutes?

Would the compound pentaminutely (from penta- and minutely) be correct in describing an event that occurs every five-minutes? Or is there a better word? Edit: For clarity, I'm looking to name an ...
0
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1answer
27 views

How do you refer to something you will go back in time and do? [closed]

This is quite confusing for me, do you refer to it in future tense, past tense or would there need to be a new tense?
0
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3answers
48 views

How can I describe the status which indicates that it's not the time to start the scheduled task

Suppose there is a task scheduled to be started at 15:00, and now it's 14:50. How can I describe this status which indicates that it's not the time to start the scheduled task, and still need to await ...
3
votes
3answers
115 views

“5 min after” vs. “at 5 min after”

I read the following sentence in Nature: The second test of cocaine seeking was a cue-induced reinstatement test conducted 5 min after the last of the extinction sessions. Would it be correct ...
0
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3answers
4k views

Up to now vs until now

I want to say that something is currently completed, in a percentage. Which sentence is correct? Up to now the job has been completed by 10% or Until now the job has been completed by 10% ...
0
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3answers
389 views

Phrases that mean “a really long time”? [closed]

I was telling my kids that sometimes there are many ways to say the same thing, especially with idiomatic phrases. I don't know why, but the simple phrase "a really long time" came to mind, and I ...
0
votes
1answer
143 views

What's the word for day/night?

So I'm customizing a WordPress (cms) for hotel for a client and he asked me to do add a new functionality that is a options dropdown where the user can select "time" like Time: - Day - ...
0
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2answers
66 views

Then or Than? Which one is correct? [closed]

which is the correct one? If not, then that e-mail wasn't personally from me. or: If not, than that e-mail wasn't personally from me.
1
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0answers
52 views

Is the expanded form of “UTC” ever spelled with an diæresis?

I've always seen "UTC" expanded as Coordinated Universal Time. In addition, both the Wikipedia and Encyclopædia Britannica entries, as well as pretty much every reference to it I've ever seen that I ...
0
votes
1answer
864 views

Which one is correct? “Offer ends at/on 1 March” or “Offer ends 1 March”

Today, avast! program (an anti-virus program for computers) showed me a message that contains: Offer ends 1 March But I also saw some sentences in other forms like: Offer ends on 1 March ...
0
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3answers
221 views

December 15th to December 16th

In general, if I say: From December 15th to December 16th Would you expect the range to be from 12/15 00:00 to 12/16 23:59 or would you expect it to be from 12/15 00:00 to 12/15 23:59?
1
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1answer
56 views

A Question on Commas

I've noticed that in all sentences I come across which start with an indication of time, there is always a comma after before the sentence is continued. For example: When I was five, I bought my first ...
-1
votes
1answer
184 views

How to suggest an alternate time/date?

How to suggest a different time? E.g. Manager asked (in email): "Hi, Can we go through these at 10AM tomorrow?" Can I answer: "Can we move it an hour to 11AM?"
0
votes
2answers
104 views

Can “yesterdays” (plural) be used to denote a range of past days?

So I just learned that "yesterdays" is a word (without the apostrophe). It is the plural of "yesterday". The trouble is, what does plural of "yesterday" really mean? I could not find any example ...
12
votes
4answers
5k views

Why “half past” and not “half to”?

When telling time and 30 minutes has gone past an hour, we say “half past”. For instance, half past 4 or half past 5. Why can’t we also say “half to”. For instance, half to 5 or half to 6? Shouldn’t ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09 [duplicate]

What would be the most frequent/common way of telling the time when the minute is between 01 and 09? Is there any difference between BE and AmE? 5:03 -> 1) five oh three 2) five three 3) three ...
5
votes
3answers
8k views

“At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?

At the beginning of the century. In the beginning of the century. How to clearly distinguish when to use at, or in?
3
votes
1answer
135 views

Words that are their own past tense

Does anyone know of a particular "rule" to know which words are their own past tense (such as "hurt"), and aren't modified for time? I'd like an easy rule to tell my students