Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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0answers
23 views

Asking about date [duplicate]

I'd like to know which way of asking questions is more common in the UK. Is there any difference? 1 What is the date today or What date is today? 2 What is the day today or What day is today? ...
5
votes
3answers
140 views

On the part of speech of “now”

I recently had a conversation about the Spanish word "ahora", in which my conversant claimed that "ahora" is always an adverb, and never a noun. This lead me to investigate the part of speech of ...
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6answers
2k views

Can “crepuscular” and/or “twilight” apply to morning half-light as well as in the evening

I know that's "sorta" two questions in one, but I'm stuck in an argument with a guy who says both words can apply to morning half-light. I disagree and think both only apply in the evening. I think ...
12
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8answers
23k views

Precise names for parts of a day

I have learnt these words so far, please correct me if I'm wrong: Dawn, maybe 4am–6am? Morning, maybe 6am–9am? The food for the morning is called breakfast. People greet each other Good morning! ...
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1answer
15k views

English notation for hour, minutes and seconds

I often see English notation about time using the " and ' symbols. I have always mistaken about the two, and even their meaning. I'm more used to "01:05:56", for example. Which is for the hour, ...
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1answer
46 views

How to mention times before? [closed]

Which form is better for mentioning a time before : a month and ten days ago ten days and a month ago one month and ten days ago ten days and a month ago
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6answers
9k views

“Good night” or “good evening”?

If it's 7:30pm, which of these phrases is correct, Good night or Good evening?
5
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4answers
357 views

How often is “more often than not”?

A person, supposedly a native speaker of English, assured me that I would say "often" means roughly 50-60% of the time, whereas "more often than not" means 75-95% of the time, and is closer in ...
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4answers
5k views

What phrase is “o'clock” contracting?

I have been intrigued by the word o'clock since I learned English. Although there is an equivalent to this word in my native language (Spanish en punto meaning on point or on the dot) I want to know ...
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3answers
35k views

What does the phrase “half seven” mean?

I've heard the British term "half seven" (or "half nine," "half five", etc) used to tell time. I can't remember though if it means 6:30 or 7:30 (i.e. half an hour before seven, or half past seven)? ...
13
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7answers
11k views

How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation?

A couple years ago, I switched all my personal clocks 24-hour notation. I live in the US, and 24-hour time is used very, very rarely. So, I haven't been able to listen to anyone say times aloud. ...
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3answers
2k views

How do they express the time, in American and British English?

I don't know if this is a good question. But as far as I know, and as I do it, American English also say "after" other than "past" in expressing times. For example, a quarter after six instead of, a ...
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1answer
120 views

How to say one minute past midnight in military time?

I first would like to say that I did read How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? but my question isn't answered there. How do you say 0001 in military time? oh one hours? oh oh one ...
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5answers
32k views

“For the time being” vs. “for now”

Consider the following passages: A litter made of two rifles and two field jackets would suffice for now. That was good news; another bit was that the EPW was a lieutenant, a regimental REMF ...
42
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6answers
27k views

Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to?

At what point does next Tuesday mean the next Tuesday that will come to pass and no longer the Tuesday after the Tuesday that will come to pass? And, when does the meaning switch back? ...
0
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2answers
59 views

How to use decades in this sentence?

I want to say ongoing research on matter X using the word decades. The research started from the date of discovery of matter x in 1982 onwards. This should be an opening statement of an academic ...
0
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0answers
17 views

what is correct for next monday - this monday coming or referring to monday week? [duplicate]

what is correct for next monday - this monday coming or referring to monday week? Then we have the problem saying monday after next......obviously referring to monday week
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1answer
56 views

Telling the time [closed]

In Ireland we say: "Twenty-five to ten" (9:35) (21:35) "Twenty to ten" (9:40) (21:40) "A quarter to ten" (9:45) (21:45) "Ten to ten" (9:50) (21:50) "Five to ten" (9:55) (21:55) "Ten o'clock" or just ...
3
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1answer
113 views

“Four years are” vs. “four years is” [duplicate]

An exam question is driving me crazy. Find the mistake in the following: Four years are a long time to spend away from family and friends. Literally everyone solved it by replacing are with ...
2
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2answers
997 views

Verbs that follow an amount of time, singular or plural? [duplicate]

Which one is grammatically correct? One hour and a half is all you have left. One hour and a half are all you have left. Two hours is all you have left. Two hours are all you have left. ...
3
votes
5answers
178 views

“Your 1 hour 6 minutes are up” / “Your 1 hour 6 minutes is up”

I'm not sure which of these is more correct. Your 1 hour is up. This is easy. Singular. Your 5 minutes are up Again, simple enough. Plural. Your 1 hour and 6 minutes is up. Your 3 ...
0
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1answer
32 views

Is it Game time or game-time? [duplicate]

I'm trying to verify the correctness the following sentence: Game time is Sunday. Is it correct or should it be "Game-time"?
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2answers
191 views

How do you denote date and time in written English?

I always wonder how to denote date and time when I have to make an appointment. To make sure that I don't make typos, I always mention the weekday. What is the correct way to do so? Appointment at ...
0
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3answers
75 views

Period of time, a bit or a while

If I want to place my luggage at the hotel for a few hours, how is it best to ask if I can do this? Should I ask the receptionist: "Can I place my luggage here a bit?" or "Can I place my luggage ...
21
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5answers
11k views

Why do we say “last night” and not “yesterday night”?

As from object, is there a rational reason for saying "last night" rather than "yesterday night", though you would say "yesterday morning" and "yesterday afternoon"?
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2answers
47 views

Hour minute format pluralization in a specific context

Check the following screens: https://www.dropbox.com/s/bp40q2yqk4xatzc/11.png https://www.dropbox.com/s/cobof2uvk6htwv9/1.png you can see that I'm not consistent with the hour format. My question ...
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1answer
178 views

Position of “now” in a sentence [closed]

What is the correct position of "now" in the following sentence. What is the rule for this? We now consider the second case. We consider now the second case. We consider the second case now. Now we ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

“Obama is in town this weekend” or “Obama will be in town this weekend” [duplicate]

A friend of mine used the following phrase to tell me about Obama's visit to Malaysia this weekend (he told me this when it was not already the weekend): Obama is in town this weekend. This ...
2
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3answers
273 views

Variations in meaning between “Last week” vs. “The last week” vs “The last n weeks”? [duplicate]

Similarly between "Last month" and "The last month". Last week implies, at some point during the previous week. Not inclusive of the current week. What exactly does the last week mean? Is that ...
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4answers
71 views

Short for “time period in life” like teenage

I am looking for a word to describe a time period in life, like teenage, but that would work for any time period, like 11 – 22. I want to say it is xxxxxx in everyone's life.
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2answers
90 views

An adjective to describe the benefits associated with saving time

I'm looking for an adjective to replace 'time saving' in the following sentence: "...a range of immediate and tangible time-saving and economic benefits" I'm thinking it should be something like ...
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3answers
10k views

Does “within an hour” mean before, after, or both?

Does within mean before or after? Or does it mean both? For example, Do not drink or eat within an hour of these pills.
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2answers
2k views

'Tonight' and 'this evening'

If I ask Are you available tonight for a drink? does tonight refer to this evening and/or this night? If not, what would be considered the beginning of the night and the end of the evening? Do ...
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1answer
171 views

What is correct: still to be/continue to be/should be/must be? [closed]

I want to build a sentence referring to the past, present and future: The Bible was, and continues to be, instrumental in spreading God's message to mankind. The Bible was, and should still be, ...
14
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3answers
9k views

Saying “today morning” to mean “this morning”

As an American, I use the term this morning, but I’ve noticed some Asian Indian coworkers who always say today morning to mean what I mean by this morning. Is this an Indian English “dialectism”? Is ...
1
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2answers
325 views

What's the meaning of “over two-years' time”

For example, if someone says: "Looking at the next three years, I think stock prices will drop," then does the phrase "two-years' time" mean at the end of the next three years, in the next ...
0
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1answer
96 views

Use of “last year” and “last one year”?

The term last year defines last year according to calender.So if I say last year in 2014, it means I refer to 2013. On the other hand, the term last one year refers to last 12 months.So if I use this ...
0
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2answers
32 views

“as she did X” vs “while she did X”

Another question related to correctly conveying a sense of time: Who will be held accountable for the costs incurred as the managers dragged their feet? vs Who will be held accountable for ...
2
votes
2answers
30 views

“cost incurred before” vs “cost incurred until”?

I am wondering which of the following is correct/preferable: We need to take into account the cost incurred until action is finally taken. vs We need to account for the cost incurred ...
11
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7answers
25k views

“In time” versus “on time”

Which one is correct: Submit your work in time. Submit your work on time.
1
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2answers
153 views

What is the correct adjective that describes the temporal proximity between the two events?

I'm trying to find the best adjective to describe the temporal proximity between the two events: the creation of two WiFi networks. Currently I'm using almost concurrent to describe the proximity: ...
-1
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1answer
73 views

Writing deadlines

I'm currently using the following date format for setting deadlines: Monday, 27 January 2014, 3 PM My questions are: Should I mention time at the beginning or leave it at the end? Should I ...
0
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3answers
6k views

“an hour and a half” or “one and a half hours”

Are both "an hour and a half" and "one and a half hours" correct? If so, is either more appropriate in different contexts? Example context: "The Superbowl starts in less than one and a half ...
14
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19answers
6k views

Single word for a very small amount of time [closed]

In French, if I want to quantify a very small amount of time (but not fixed: it can be 5 ms or 0.1 ms) I can use a pouième. Is there an equivalent in English? I'm not looking for an expression but ...
1
vote
2answers
89 views

“Leave for <time>”

What is the meaning of the following? You have to leave for six thirty. (p.m. implied) Does it mean you have to leave for your destination at 6:30 p.m.? Or does it mean that you have arrive at ...
0
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4answers
649 views

Statement of fact: future simple

Why is the simple future used in the following sentence instead of the simple present? A client software will not transfer files.
3
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3answers
169 views

The single word for “Volume per second”

Will anybody be able to mention the English word for "Volume per second (or preferably Volume per Time unit) or "Amount of task per a second"? Thank you.
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0answers
696 views

What does “within 30 days of assuming command” mean? [duplicate]

An Army regulation requires somthing to be done "within 30 days of assuming command". Does that mean it must be done within the time window of the day of assuming command plus 30? Or, does it mean ...
0
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4answers
5k views

What do you call “one hundredth of a second”?

As in: He broke the world record of 14.05 I tried searching Wikipedia and ended up with centisecond. It sounds so scientific. What is it called in colloquial English?
2
votes
1answer
156 views

Telling the time “3:15” in American English

Which of the followings is the most common way to say 3:15 in American English? A quarter past three A quarter after three Three fifteen Also, in the last example "three fifteen", ...