Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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-5
votes
1answer
895 views

In the past 2 years [duplicate]

We are now at year 2013. What does it mean by saying in the past 2 years?Whats the period it refering to?
3
votes
2answers
79 views

Is there anything wrong with asking what 12pm means? [on hold]

I was preparing an application, where the specified deadline was today 12pm. My understanding of 12pm was 12 noon, but I found it a little odd for a deadline to be at 12 noon. So I sent the following ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

between (year) and (year), by which time

"In a study in the Bahamas, lionfish abundance was found to have increased rapidly between 2004 and 2010, by which time lionfish accounted for nearly 40% of the total predator biomass in the system." ...
-1
votes
1answer
45 views

Which one is correct? “Offer ends at/on 1 March” or “Offer ends 1 March”

Today, avast! program (an anti-virus program for computers) showed me a message that contains: Offer ends 1 March But I also saw some sentences in other forms like: Offer ends on 1 March ...
1
vote
2answers
191 views

Does “every time” not mean “all the time”?

In this article, Singapore Plans To Become The World's First Smart Nation, there is an explanation about the E3A plan by Leonard: We're working on something that we've named E3A, which is our way ...
6
votes
4answers
25k views

“In the last 3 months” vs “in the past 3 months”

What's the difference between in the last 3 months and in the past 3 months if there is any?
8
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even ...
3
votes
2answers
27k views

English notation for hour, minutes and seconds

I often see English notation about time using the " and ' symbols. I have always mistaken about the two, and even their meaning. I'm more used to "01:05:56", for example. Which is for the hour, ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Is it possible to “increase brevity”?

The title largely explains my concern. Does the formulation - "increase brevity" make sense? Is brevity a measurement that can be increased or decreased? The Oxford English dictionary mentions that ...
0
votes
3answers
51 views

‘On’ vs. ‘at’ with immutable date-time string [duplicate]

I understand that on is used for dates and at for times, as in On vs At with date and time. But what can I use when I have a string consists of both a date and a time? The issue is that I can’t change ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Time — Gone Eight? [closed]

I'm reading a novel set in the UK (I'm in Maryland, USA). In the novel, someone asks the time; the reply is, "gone eight." What does this mean, please? Thank you.
6
votes
4answers
1k views

How often is “more often than not”?

A person, supposedly a native speaker of English, assured me that I would say "often" means roughly 50-60% of the time, whereas "more often than not" means 75-95% of the time, and is closer in ...
2
votes
3answers
105 views

Unambiguous adjective for an event that happens once every two months

I organize an event once every two months: January 5th, March 5th, May 5th, etc. I want to convey that frequency to an international audience. Is there any unambiguous adjective for this? I would ...
2
votes
1answer
270 views

Is it correct to say “Yesterday night”? [duplicate]

I have heard a lot of people say "Yesterday night" is that considered correct? I have always said last night.
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Two questions - present progressive

I know that saying "I just saw her" is correct, but people also say "I've just arrived", so saying "I've just seen her" is also correct? Maybe it's a UK/US difference ? If it's correct, then "Just" ...
19
votes
13answers
2k views

What do you call the time period between notification of an event and the event?

I'm in the situation where I have an event, and I want to notify some people 15 minutes before that event happens (but it could be 30 minutes, or 1 day, or any amount of time). What do you call that ...
2
votes
3answers
15k views

“an hour and a half” or “one and a half hours”

Are both "an hour and a half" and "one and a half hours" correct? If so, is either more appropriate in different contexts? Example context: "The Superbowl starts in less than one and a half ...
0
votes
4answers
94 views

Is there an adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?

“Still” means “in the past and now”: “It is still raining.” Is there an English adverb meaning “now, but not in the past”?
20
votes
5answers
3k views

What method of counting puts Twelfth Night on January 6th?

I know English has (or at least had) some strange usages of eve and night, but I still can’t figure out how December 25th and 12 can be combined to come up with January 6th. (This stems from my ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

When is Christmas Eve Eve?

I have recently seen weather forecasters making predictions for Christmas Eve Day, Christmas Eve Night, and for Christmas Day. One also reads of Christmas Eve Eve, with two eves. Are those all ...
2
votes
1answer
117 views

Is “Tomorrow, I will buy it” correct? [closed]

My brother and I are having a discussion, whether it is grammatically correct (or any native speaker would ever say a sentence): Tomorrow, I will buy it. I think it is not correct, it strikes me ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

If an event “ends on” a day, does the day constitute a part of the event?

If I loaned someone some item, and I told them that their possession of the item "ends on 2014/12/31", would 2014/12/31 be part of the time that they still have possession of the item? Or, say if I ...
5
votes
2answers
73 views

Number in time periods

Why do we say "10 minutes or less" rather than "10 minutes or fewer?"
1
vote
2answers
98 views

Doing two things at once without conjuction

Are the following sentence, for two things going on at once, grammatically correct? Tom is doing laundry singing a song. It is not easy to go to school working part-time. I saw an accident riding my ...
-5
votes
1answer
312 views

Using prepositions with time

Which is the correct preposition? at evening on evening in the evening Is this correct, and if so, which one: He mailed me (on evening / in the evening / at evening). How are prepositions ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

two months later vs in two months

I've come across the adverb 'later' in the past tense to refer to something that takes place at a time following an earlier time e.g. "He resigned two months later" I wonder if we can also use it ...
14
votes
5answers
47k views

How should “midnight on…” be interpreted?

From what I understand, the word "midnight" is usually interpreted incorrectly. Midnight is written as "12am" which would imply that it's in the morning. Therefore, it should be at the start of the ...
0
votes
1answer
180 views

Telling the time [closed]

In Ireland we say: "Twenty-five to ten" (9:35) (21:35) "Twenty to ten" (9:40) (21:40) "A quarter to ten" (9:45) (21:45) "Ten to ten" (9:50) (21:50) "Five to ten" (9:55) (21:55) "Ten o'clock" or just ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

How to say “the data collected from the previous month to current timstamp” in the following sentence?

"This validates the observation that historical data with at most one month gap closing up to the current timestamp is favored." Not sure whether the sentece above is correct or not . I want to ...
1
vote
3answers
110 views

Word/phrase including both recent past and near future

I'm looking for a word or very short phrase for the period of time that is close to now, including both past and future. Words like "recent" or "latest" would cover the near past, and words like ...
1
vote
2answers
164 views

Is there any difference between “monthly average” and “average per month”?

I have trouble understanding if I should use "monthly average" or "average per month" when asking someone to calculate monthly average of a variable, e.g. heating expenses. Is there any difference, if ...
2
votes
1answer
304 views

Grammatical term for words like “yesterday”, “today”, “tomorrow”

We class words like "he", "she" and "they" as pronouns. Is there a category of words that "yesterday", "today" and "tomorrow" fall into?
0
votes
3answers
195 views

What word could be used to describe a period of time that stays recent?

I have a button in an app that allows a user to enter a fixed period, i.e. they specify the start and end date and it always stays the same. I have another button that allows them to enter an ...
4
votes
2answers
238 views

Words for describing an events start time

I am trying to classify events into two distinct groups. Event, in this context, means a public event which people might go to. This includes a broad collection of things including concerts, plays, ...
0
votes
3answers
423 views

Antonym/Opposite of “on the morrow”

If my birthday is on the 15th August and I tidy up on August 16th I can say: "I threw a huge party and tidied up on the morrow.". But if I prepared for the party on August 12th then what do I say? "I ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

Time, hours, periods

Could anybody say me how to write periods of time in English. For example, I know how to say in case of years: from one year to another year. But how to deal with hours. Is it the same? from 5 am to 6 ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Do short time symbols need to be pluralised

We are wanting to know how to shorten time symbols/words in an open source code library. The code will emit: 1 second, 2 seconds, 1 hour, 2 hours, 1 week, 2 weeks, etc. Is the correct shorthand 1s, ...
0
votes
1answer
223 views

Why do we say 'last Monday morning' but not 'last morning'? [duplicate]

There was a very similar question asked about 'last night' and 'yesterday night' here but I didn't really think the question was answered that definitively. Also, I thought about how we use other ...
0
votes
0answers
6 views

“a time” vs “the time” [duplicate]

Reagan's "The Speech" made half a century ago was titled "A time for choosing". When is "a time" more appropriate than "the time" in the context of making a momentous choice?
0
votes
1answer
57 views

Time period in a date period [closed]

I want to mention the date and time I collected my questionnaires in an academic report. Let's say they are distributed: Time period: 1:00PM - 4:00PM Date period: 1 October 2014 - 3 October ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What's the meaning of “over two-years' time”

For example, if someone says: Looking at the next three years, I think stock prices will drop, then does the phrase "two-years' time" mean at the end of the next three years, in the next three ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

“For three years” vs “in three years” [duplicate]

I haven't talked to my wife for three years. I haven't talked to my wife in three years. Are in and for interchangeable in these sentences?
1
vote
5answers
2k views

Word meaning “close in time, or presently happening”

Is there a word that can be used to describe something that is either close in time, or currently happening? Something like "proximate" or "imminent", but without the implication that the thing has ...
16
votes
5answers
2k views

Hypernym for “clock” and “watch”

Yesterday I said: "I can't read analog clocks", but my interlocutor corrected me saying that what I was pointing at was a watch and not a clock. Now, I am aware of the difference between the two, ...
0
votes
4answers
108 views

“During” a Period of Time

I'm working on a sentence (example below). It doesn't quite feel right: I tried to count the number of cars driven during 1980-1990. Specifically, the issue here is about usage of the ...
4
votes
7answers
7k views

Is “yesterday night” acceptable? [duplicate]

I catch a lot of grief about this from family and friends, so I figured I'd settle the score once and for all. In verbal context (though not written), I tend to use the phrase ... yesterday ...
21
votes
6answers
14k views

Why do we say “last night” and not “yesterday night”?

As from object, is there a rational reason for saying "last night" rather than "yesterday night", though you would say "yesterday morning" and "yesterday afternoon"?
6
votes
4answers
4k views

Is it correct to say “12:00am”?

I've read in various places the first minute of a day described as 12:00am. Now, whilst I personally prefer to use 24h clock notation and therefore don't have this problem as I can simply describe ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

How to phrase this statement with two time related adjectives? [closed]

I'm trying to say: "These are the current future plans for the project." I'm highlighting the current plans I have for the project that I'd like to do in the future. This doesn't seem to be correct ...
0
votes
1answer
167 views

Does the word “midnight” mean only 12 o'clock at night? [closed]

Does the word "midnight" mean only 12 o'clock at night? Is 1:30 AM midnight? Could you teach me?