Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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4
votes
3answers
805 views

Right format for time of day when corresponding with Germans

I'm writing to some German folks in English, and I'm referring to the time of day -- an event that starts at 10 o'clock in the morning. I know that if I were writing to other Americans, I'd use 10 ...
3
votes
3answers
635 views

Meaning of “we leave at eight thirty for nine”

In the expression we leave at eight thirty for nine, what time is the departure going to be?
9
votes
8answers
1k views

How to name a 15-minute period?

In Dutch, we have the word "kwartier" to denote a 15-minute period. It is derived from the word "kwart", which means quarter. It is very common to use this word in both spoken and written language. ...
7
votes
0answers
342 views

Pronouncing “00's” (as in 2000's) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the name of the first decade in a century? When talking about decades in the 20th century, it is customary to refer to them using only the last two digits. For ...
17
votes
4answers
1k views

Word for “distance in time”

I need the correct English word for the German expression (zeitlicher) Abstand. Abstand means "distance", and zeitlich means "in time". The "distance" between building maintenance dates is about ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

“Contemporary” vs. “contemporaneous”

What is the difference between these two words? contemporary: From the same time period, coexistent in time. contemporaneous: Existing or created in the same period of time. I know that ...
2
votes
3answers
304 views

What is the origin of the term “in forever”?

Is it acceptable to use the term "in forever" when referring to a length of time, even though it is illogical? For example, "Ohmigosh, I haven't seen you in forever!" Or is this term one that we ...
2
votes
4answers
393 views

Is “time” needed in this sentence?

I must remember to bath within ten minutes time. Is the word "time" needed in this sentence, or is it superficial? Is it even wrong to remove it?
4
votes
2answers
8k views

Which is correct here: “*sometime* next month” vs. “*sometimes* next month”?

Are those expressions equivalent, or which one should be preferred? For instance: I should finish this work sometimes next week versus I should finish this work sometime next week
6
votes
7answers
999 views

Is there a single word for a “unit of time”?

If I were to have a text box for someone to enter an integer and dropdown list from which my user would select day(s), hour(s), minute(s) or second(s), is there a single word that would describe what ...
2
votes
3answers
884 views

Is there any difference between “All the night” and “All night long”?

Is there any difference in nuance between these two expressions, any examples of where one would be more appropriate (or even just sound better?) (On reflection, I'm not sure I'd ever say All the ...