Topics related to time in written or spoken English

learn more… | top users | synonyms

0
votes
0answers
77 views

What is a “nice” word to express the time during 25 to 27 or 8? [duplicate]

I am trying to find a nice word that expresses the time after midnight and before morning. Within my poor research, I could find such as "overnight", "late night", "wee hours", "dawn", etc. I think ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “12:30” (the time of day) an abstract noun?

Nothing else to add, I just want to make sure.
0
votes
1answer
553 views

What is this time describing noun called? [duplicate]

A noun for when something happened is occasion. A noun for how long something took is duration. But how would you describe an event that happened at a certain time after an occasion? Example: The ...
1
vote
1answer
207 views

Would “pentaminutely” reflect an event that occurs every five minutes?

Would the compound pentaminutely (from penta- and minutely) be correct in describing an event that occurs every five-minutes? Or is there a better word? Edit: For clarity, I'm looking to name an ...
2
votes
5answers
15k views

What is an appropriate greeting to use at night time? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Good night” or “good evening”? I am in the process of creating a software application which displays a greeting to users based on the time of day. I have come to a ...
-1
votes
1answer
6k views

Is “even when” a conjunction?

Does even when grammatically work the same as even though and even if work? Or is it more of a time expression? Following the rules is essential, even when it’s difficult. Following the rules is ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference between yesterday and one day ago?

Do yesterday and one day ago refer to the same time period? If no, what is the difference?
5
votes
1answer
2k views

When is Christmas Eve Eve?

I have recently seen weather forecasters making predictions for Christmas Eve Day, Christmas Eve Night, and for Christmas Day. One also reads of Christmas Eve Eve, with two eves. Are those all ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Question about the future “tense”

My daughter, who is in the 4th grade, was asked to answer questions about the following sentence: What time can you meet us at the school on Tuesday? She was asked questions about the usage of ...
1
vote
2answers
115 views

Is there a term for the other 2 months in a quarter?

The organization I work for has monthly volunteer opportunities, and quarterly volunteer opportunities. The trouble comes when someone serves quarterly (say, the 1st Monday of each quarter) and we ...
2
votes
3answers
365 views

Right use of expressions like 'Is today any match'? [closed]

I recently went to the US and one day I was talking with one of my colleagues about sports and I asked "Is today any match of World Series?" which was definitely incorrect judging by her reaction ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“We talked until late”

We talked until late Is this sentence correct? It sounds strange to me but I'm not sure what's grammatically wrong about it. What about this? We talked into the night This sounds better to ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

“Planning for next year” vs. “planning for the next year”

I would like to start planning for next year. In the above sentence, there is no definite article before the words next year. Should it be present, as in the following sentence which sounds far ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

Is “since so long” correct?

Because of our negligence towards the issue since so long, ... Am I using this correctly? I want to convey something like 1-2 months ago or since around September.
1
vote
4answers
177 views

Refer to the state of something “at the time”

I want to communicate this: I didn't think the zoo would attract visitors in its state at the time. What can I replace "state at the time" with? Perhaps something like "then-state"? I can't say ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Today Was vs Today Is

If someone asks, "What day is it today?" and it is 10 pm, is it correct to respond with "Today was Tuesday." since the day is over and it's night? Is that response incorrect? Should the ...
9
votes
4answers
26k views

Proper Timezone Acronym Usage - PT vs PDT or PST

What is the difference with using PT (Pacific Time) vs PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) or PST (Pacific Standard Time)? When you write the time, 2:00pm PT, would that be considered incorrect because it is ...
12
votes
4answers
4k views

Why “half past” and not “half to”?

When telling time and 30 minutes has gone past an hour, we say “half past”. For instance, half past 4 or half past 5. Why can’t we also say “half to”. For instance, half to 5 or half to 6? Shouldn’t ...
1
vote
3answers
4k views

“This summer” versus “last summer” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to? This is October. We went to the hill station this year's (2012) summer. Now, how do I say this to others. I have been saying this ...
3
votes
3answers
284 views

Generic time range word

I am looking for a word that can replace idioms like daily or monthly, but has the same meaning, and it's generic. By example, if I want to describe my pocket money, I can say I have a daily amount, ...
0
votes
3answers
125 views

Expression regarding a periodic task

So, if I have to do a certain task during a whole week but with a 3-week gap. For instance, in a 3-week period I will have to do that task for 1 week, in a 6-week period for 2 weeks, not in a row, of ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

How do you spell time specifications given in (military) “Zulu time”?

For an example, let's consider the time specification "1539Z". How do the people in the military spell that? "Fifteen thirty-nine Zulu"? "Fifteen thirty-nine zee"? "One fife tree niner zulu"? Are ...
2
votes
4answers
4k views

What is a word that means “a span of six months”?

Is there a word that means "a span of six months"? That is, I want to connote a stretch of time that lasts half a year, not an event that happens every six months.
0
votes
3answers
955 views

“Feeling safe? So do I!” — is this grammatical?

I have a small question regarding the usage of the present simple, present continuous and auxiliary verbs. Is this correct English? Feel safe? (Do you feel safe?) → So do I! Feeling safe? ...
3
votes
2answers
6k views

What's the origin of the idiom “don't give it the time of day”?

Twice in the past few hours, I've seen the idiom "don't give it the time of day". Now, I immediately knew and understood what the people using the phrase meant, but then I realized that I didn't know ...
0
votes
4answers
9k views

What do you call “one hundredth of a second”?

As in: He broke the world record of 14.05 I tried searching Wikipedia and ended up with centisecond. It sounds so scientific. What is it called in colloquial English?
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is ‘then’ of ‘now and then’ past or future? [closed]

Then is commonly used for things happened in both the past and future. In the common phrase now and then, is then in the past or the future? Could anyone help?
3
votes
3answers
2k views

using phrase “weekend of”

Say the 24th is a Monday and you say that you’ll be doing something the weekend of the 24th, meaning the 22nd and 23rd. Isn’t that incorrect? I would say the weekend of the 24th means the 29th and ...
0
votes
3answers
603 views

Present Perfect or simple past?

A student has written: Still, I have already been aware of most of the information even before watching the video. It doesn't feel right and I would normally use a past simple here. I'm on my ...
2
votes
4answers
126 views

Word usage: Date before

How one can say that a date must happen before other date, for intance: The X starting date should be prior to the Y starting date. Is this sentence idiomatic or there is another way of stating ...
7
votes
5answers
68k views

“For the time being” vs. “for now”

Consider the following passages: A litter made of two rifles and two field jackets would suffice for now. That was good news; another bit was that the EPW was a lieutenant, a regimental REMF ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a word that means near-daily?

I am trying to write a document that describes the frequency with which we perform a task. It is usually done daily, however I don't want to be tied to having to do it daily. Is there a more ...
15
votes
5answers
3k views

The difference between “take” and “last”

We say: "the meeting will last two hours". But we say: "how long does the flight take?" Please let me know the difference between last and take and when we should use each.
2
votes
0answers
33 views

24-hours notice vs. 24-hour's notice vs. 24-hours' notice [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Phrasing “An hour's rest” In the sentence "You must provide 24-hours notice." which is correct: 24-hours notice 24-hour's notice 24-hours' notice
2
votes
4answers
4k views

Single word for “time spent” [closed]

Is there a single word for an amount of time spent on a task for example? More specific than duration?
1
vote
1answer
4k views

Difference between “term” and “period”

What is the difference between term and period in meaning distance in time? Is it possible to use one or both of them when we describe a point in time (We have time till 1st of December so we have ...
4
votes
2answers
322 views

Two technical times in one sentence

Which of these sentences should I use? Algorithms 1 and 2 work in time O(n) and O(n^2) respectively. Or Algorithms 1 and 2 work in times O(n) and O(n^2) respectively.
10
votes
9answers
22k views

Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise?

The period between sunrise and noon is called "morning", between noon and sunset is "afternoon". Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise? Edit/Clarification: Wikipedia defines ...
12
votes
7answers
3k views

Can “crepuscular” and/or “twilight” apply to morning half-light as well as in the evening

I know that's "sorta" two questions in one, but I'm stuck in an argument with a guy who says both words can apply to morning half-light. I disagree and think both only apply in the evening. I think ...
-5
votes
1answer
481 views

The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis

Which of the following is correct? We hire our bicycle... by the hour. by hours. by an hour. for hours.
7
votes
9answers
11k views

Alternatives to “Good Night” when sleeping in the afternoon

It seems to be a silly question but I was puzzled when somebody bid me good night, when I was going to sleep at 1:00 PM. If somebody goes to sleep in the afternoon, is it correct to bid him "good ...
1
vote
1answer
568 views

Correct use of “before” & “from”?

I came across this sentence in a newspaper: Five minutes from the end I didn't think we could win this game.We deserved to win this championship. I am confused as to why he uses from the end. ...
0
votes
2answers
5k views

Meaning of “10 of 8”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does 'ten of six' mean in regard to time? In a Family Guy episode (The Hand That Rocks The Wheelchair), Meg asks "is it 10 of 8?", apparently looking up at ...
4
votes
3answers
4k views

“Wednesday week”

I know that the English will say "Wednesday week" to mean a week from Wednesday. Is there a name for this sort of construction? Also, I have a friend from India who will say "today morning". Is ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

“At day five”, “on day five”, or something else?

When considering a set of days and writing about them in a 'diary mode', what preposition should I use in the following example: He died at day 5 of the treatment. He died on day 5 of the ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

“Please finish this by May 15” — can I still do it today? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? Today is May 15. I have an email in my inbox that says Please respond by May 15. My question is: what ...
1
vote
4answers
8k views

Might “see you shortly” be used to mean in a week's time?

I wonder if it's appropriate to say "see you shortly" when we both know that it's going to happen in a week's time. What I'm trying to say is that I'm looking forward to see the person, but I already ...
4
votes
0answers
15k views

“On time” vs. “in time” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “In time ” versus “on time” I don't know if there is any difference. Which of the following should I use? I'll be on time to catch the ...
6
votes
5answers
5k views

Is it correct to say “12:00am”?

I've read in various places the first minute of a day described as 12:00am. Now, whilst I personally prefer to use 24h clock notation and therefore don't have this problem as I can simply describe ...
2
votes
2answers
8k views

What does 'later this month' mean?

If today were April 30 (actually it is), what does 'later this month' mean? If today were April 15, what does 'later this month' mean? If today were April 1, what does 'later this month' mean? ADD: ...