Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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1
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4answers
2k views

Single word for “time spent” [closed]

Is there a single word for an amount of time spent on a task for example? More specific than duration?
0
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4answers
4k views

Might “see you shortly” be used to mean in a week's time?

I wonder if it's appropriate to say "see you shortly" when we both know that it's going to happen in a week's time. What I'm trying to say is that I'm looking forward to see the person, but I already ...
4
votes
2answers
212 views

Two technical times in one sentence

Which of these sentences should I use? Algorithms 1 and 2 work in time O(n) and O(n^2) respectively. Or Algorithms 1 and 2 work in times O(n) and O(n^2) respectively.
3
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2answers
5k views

“When” vs. “what time”

When are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? or What time are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? Please elaborate on the semantical differences.
-4
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1answer
320 views

The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis

Which of the following is correct? We hire our bicycle... by the hour. by hours. by an hour. for hours.
1
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1answer
172 views

Correct use of “before” & “from”?

I came across this sentence in a newspaper: Five minutes from the end I didn't think we could win this game.We deserved to win this championship. I am confused as to why he uses from the end. ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Meaning of “10 of 8”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does 'ten of six' mean in regard to time? In a Family Guy episode (The Hand That Rocks The Wheelchair), Meg asks "is it 10 of 8?", apparently looking up at ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“At day five”, “on day five”, or something else?

When considering a set of days and writing about them in a 'diary mode', what preposition should I use in the following example: He died at day 5 of the treatment. He died on day 5 of the ...
2
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2answers
5k views

What does 'later this month' mean?

If today were April 30 (actually it is), what does 'later this month' mean? If today were April 15, what does 'later this month' mean? If today were April 1, what does 'later this month' mean? ADD: ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Is it correct to say “12:00am”?

I've read in various places the first minute of a day described as 12:00am. Now, whilst I personally prefer to use 24h clock notation and therefore don't have this problem as I can simply describe ...
-2
votes
2answers
182 views

Describing the preference of some time period's being closer to another time period that it forgoes [closed]

Just asked this question on "Christianity", but feel asked it in a very awkward way: Do we have any evidence that Martin Luther considered some individuals of the Roman Catholic clergy living in ...
4
votes
1answer
252 views

Outmoded word for “next Tuesday”

I am writing an email and wanted to refer to this coming Tuesday. The phrase "Tuesday est" popped into my mind (something Miss Marple might have said) but when I googled it I could find no reference. ...
5
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3answers
413 views

How should I describe 2:45?

What is the most common way to express 2:45, using quarter, in the US? Quarter of three? Quarter to three? Quarter till three?
2
votes
2answers
782 views

“In second” or “in seconds” when talking about time [closed]

When talking about time as a unit, which one is correct, in second or in seconds? For example: How long does it take to complete the task in second? or How long does it take to complete the ...
2
votes
1answer
270 views

When can I omit “for” before a time duration?

Do not watch television [for] more than one hour a day. Is omitting the “for” okay or is that grammatically incorrect?
4
votes
2answers
217 views

When do we need to add 's' to a numeric year?

I have found some statements using the format years instead of year. When do we use years like 1950s and 2010s, rather than year like 1950 and 2010? Fish stocks here began to decline in the 1950s, ...
1
vote
3answers
343 views

“One way would be” vs “One way will be”?

What is the difference between "One way would be" and "One way will be"? Can both of them be used for future actions?
1
vote
1answer
300 views

Time format “10 to 10”

Can someone tell what does this time format "10 to 10" mean? Is it 9:50 or 10:10?
3
votes
2answers
5k views

24 hour time. How to say it? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? Which words can be used to say time in 24 hour format? If, for instance, for 4:00 one might say "four o'clock", is it ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

When did ironic use of “as in” start?

As far as I (as non-native speaker) understand the words as in, this is short for for instance, as in: Understanding “that” as in this statement It's my impression that at some point in time ...
1
vote
5answers
3k views

How to say that you are going to do something really soon? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Do it very quickly” vs “do it ASAP” Quite often I need to say that I will do something really soon - e.g. in a few hours, but not sure how much ...
-1
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3answers
5k views

Is the “will let you know afternoon” correct? [closed]

Which of the following are correct? Will let you know in the afternoon. Will let you know afternoon. Will let you know after noon.
-1
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1answer
332 views

Is preposition required before 'yesterday' in certain cases? [closed]

Is the following sentence correct? Last saved by Rod yesterday at 6:15 PM
2
votes
1answer
128 views

How do you refer to grouping numbers in lots of 60? [closed]

We have the term "metric" for things measured in decimal or powers of 1000: millimeter meter kilometer And the term "hexadecimal" for things measured in base 16. What term describes grouping ...
3
votes
2answers
14k views

Should “Good Morning” always be used as the first greeting of the day? [closed]

Is it true that regardless of the time of the day, the first wish to a person must be Good morning? Even if I meet him in the afternoon?
0
votes
3answers
710 views

British Railway Stations - How do Brits read railway time tables? [closed]

This question is related to two others referring to "how to speak out loud 24-hour clock times". It has been asked how do English-speaking countries that officially use the 24-hour clock system refer ...
7
votes
3answers
7k views

What to reply to a person saying “Good Morning” when my time zone is different? [closed]

When I'm talking to a person in opposite time zone and the person greets with "Good morning" or Good evening/afternoon as per his time, is it ok to reply "Good afternoon" (as per my time-zone) when he ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it wrong to refer to 18:00hs as “eighteen hours” while in a 24-hour clock country? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? I was wondering if you could help me out with a matter that is bugging me. Do you think it is wrong to refer to ...
5
votes
6answers
1k views

How to use “summers ago”

It is November 2011 now. If I want to refer to something that happened in August 2009, which phrase do I use? two summers ago three summers ago Or is there a better phrase that conveys ...
3
votes
1answer
4k views

Why “a quarter of nine” to represent 8:45? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does 'ten of six' mean in regard to time? As a non-native speaker, I consider a quarter past nine (9:15) and a quarter to nine (8:45) easy to understand. ...
4
votes
3answers
571 views

Right format for time of day when corresponding with Germans

I'm writing to some German folks in English, and I'm referring to the time of day -- an event that starts at 10 o'clock in the morning. I know that if I were writing to other Americans, I'd use 10 ...
2
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3answers
547 views

Meaning of “we leave at eight thirty for nine”

In the expression we leave at eight thirty for nine, what time is the departure going to be?
9
votes
8answers
975 views

How to name a 15-minute period?

In Dutch, we have the word "kwartier" to denote a 15-minute period. It is derived from the word "kwart", which means quarter. It is very common to use this word in both spoken and written language. ...
6
votes
0answers
339 views

Pronouncing “00's” (as in 2000's) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the name of the first decade in a century? When talking about decades in the 20th century, it is customary to refer to them using only the last two digits. For ...
17
votes
4answers
1k views

Word for “distance in time”

I need the correct English word for the German expression (zeitlicher) Abstand. Abstand means "distance", and zeitlich means "in time". The "distance" between building maintenance dates is about ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

“Contemporary” vs. “contemporaneous”

What is the difference between these two words? contemporary: From the same time period, coexistent in time. contemporaneous: Existing or created in the same period of time. I know that ...
2
votes
3answers
245 views

What is the origin of the term “in forever”?

Is it acceptable to use the term "in forever" when referring to a length of time, even though it is illogical? For example, "Ohmigosh, I haven't seen you in forever!" Or is this term one that we ...
2
votes
4answers
373 views

Is “time” needed in this sentence?

I must remember to bath within ten minutes time. Is the word "time" needed in this sentence, or is it superficial? Is it even wrong to remove it?
4
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2answers
7k views

Which is correct here: “*sometime* next month” vs. “*sometimes* next month”?

Are those expressions equivalent, or which one should be preferred? For instance: I should finish this work sometimes next week versus I should finish this work sometime next week
6
votes
7answers
870 views

Is there a single word for a “unit of time”?

If I were to have a text box for someone to enter an integer and dropdown list from which my user would select day(s), hour(s), minute(s) or second(s), is there a single word that would describe what ...
2
votes
3answers
833 views

Is there any difference between “All the night” and “All night long”?

Is there any difference in nuance between these two expressions, any examples of where one would be more appropriate (or even just sound better?) (On reflection, I'm not sure I'd ever say All the ...