Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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3
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10answers
9k views

Is there a generic word in English that means “through time”?

I know "temporal" means "to do with time", but I'm looking specifically for a term that means "spanning time" or "over time". Not necessarily all time, as "eternal" would mean, nor do I want to ...
6
votes
5answers
4k views

Can I use “as late as” to express a deadline?

You must submit your homework as late as tomorrow. Does the sentence have the same meaning as the following one? The deadline for your homework submission is tomorrow. To be specific, I ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Do you say “thirty past six”?

When telling the time, are the following expressions legal or natural to native speakers: e.g.: 1. It's thirty past six (without adding "minutes"). 2. It's half an hour past six (adding "an hour"). ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is there a word for start and end of a time period? [closed]

Is there a word used to describe the extremities of an arbitrary time period? The word "weekend" refers to the end of a week, but it's limited to the week and it only describes the end, but not the ...
0
votes
3answers
250 views

Conventions for dates spoken without year

Today is April 4th, 2013. What is meant when someone says "May 1st"? I would assume its May 1, 2013. And "last May 1st" as May 1, 2012. As for "next May 1st", I would assume "next" is a redundancy ...
2
votes
1answer
20k views

Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How obsolete is the word “overmorrow”? Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? Perhaps a term that has fallen out of modern English ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Correct usage of adjectives related to amounts of time

What are the correct adjectives to use when talking about amounts of time (when one needs to quantify an amount of time)? In particular, which one of the two: little / small big / large For example: ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Can you say “within 90 days after”?

I understand that you can say, "within 30 days of receiving your application", but I am seeing more and more "within 30 days after your application is received". Is the latter grammatical?
6
votes
1answer
2k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”?

Q1: "I'll finish this job within 5 days" definitely means the job is expected to cost 5 days or less. However, does "I'll finish this job in 5 days" mean exactly the same? Q2: Can we say, "I'll ...
0
votes
5answers
2k views

Is it correct to say “it is forty-five past nine”?

I had a quiz and I failed because I wrote that 9.45 was "forty-five past nine" instead of "quarter to ten". I think it should have been accepted by my teacher. I searched the Internet and I found the ...
14
votes
5answers
2k views

The difference between “take” and “last”

We say: "the meeting will last two hours". But we say: "how long does the flight take?" Please let me know the difference between last and take and when we should use each.
0
votes
0answers
71 views

What is a “nice” word to express the time during 25 to 27 or 8? [duplicate]

I am trying to find a nice word that expresses the time after midnight and before morning. Within my poor research, I could find such as "overnight", "late night", "wee hours", "dawn", etc. I think ...
0
votes
1answer
470 views

What is this time describing noun called? [duplicate]

A noun for when something happened is occasion. A noun for how long something took is duration. But how would you describe an event that happened at a certain time after an occasion? Example: The ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Terms for “half a decade”

Is "lustrum" (pl. lustra) an understandable (say, at least in academic publications) or valid/common term for a five year span, e.g. to use in a table summarizing data where space can be very ...
2
votes
5answers
9k views

What is an appropriate greeting to use at night time? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Good night” or “good evening”? I am in the process of creating a software application which displays a greeting to users based on the time of day. I have come to a ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Has the use of the idiom “last week” surpassed the use of the correct “yester-week”?

In his book Write It Right, which was published in 1909 -– a hundred years ago -- Ambrose Bierce disagreed with the usage of the words “Last” and “Past” with “week”. He explained : Last and Past. ...
-2
votes
1answer
5k views

Is “even when” a conjunction?

Does even when grammatically work the same as even though and even if work? Or is it more of a time expression? Following the rules is essential, even when it’s difficult. Following the rules is ...
2
votes
0answers
93 views

Is “do something by date X” inclusive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? For example, if John says: Return it to me by March 24th. Does it mean that I need to return it to ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

“Please finish this by May 15” — can I still do it today? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? Today is May 15. I have an email in my inbox that says Please respond by May 15. My question is: what ...
6
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference between yesterday and one day ago?

Do yesterday and one day ago refer to the same time period? If no, what is the difference?
10
votes
4answers
551 views

What exactly is “noonday night”?

In answering the question Is there a term for “midnight” that is like “noon”, I came across the phrase noonday night listed as a synonym for midnight in my copy of Roget's International ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What to call the collective parts of a day?

Millennia are made of centuries and decades, centuries of decades and years. Years are months, months of weeks, but not precisely. Days are made of hours, but what do we call the several imprecise ...
5
votes
2answers
917 views

Is there a word that means near-daily?

I am trying to write a document that describes the frequency with which we perform a task. It is usually done daily, however I don't want to be tied to having to do it daily. Is there a more ...
9
votes
7answers
47k views

Should I say “have a good night” at 5:00 PM?

We're off work at 5:00PM. I've never tried to say "have a good night" at this time of day. In fact, I wouldn't even say it at all unless I'd like to say it to someone who is heading to bed. When I'm ...
6
votes
1answer
964 views

Question about the future “tense”

My daughter, who is in the 4th grade, was asked to answer questions about the following sentence: What time can you meet us at the school on Tuesday? She was asked questions about the usage of ...
1
vote
2answers
103 views

Is there a term for the other 2 months in a quarter?

The organization I work for has monthly volunteer opportunities, and quarterly volunteer opportunities. The trouble comes when someone serves quarterly (say, the 1st Monday of each quarter) and we ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is “since so long” correct?

Because of our negligence towards the issue since so long, ... Am I using this correctly? I want to convey something like 1-2 months ago or since around September.
12
votes
3answers
935 views

Why is “Saturday” Romanic?

Sunday and Monday are named after the sun and moon (English < Germanic), and Tuesday through Friday are named after Anglo-Saxon/Germanic gods. This seems consistent enough so far, but then we come ...
2
votes
3answers
326 views

Right use of expressions like 'Is today any match'? [closed]

I recently went to the US and one day I was talking with one of my colleagues about sports and I asked "Is today any match of World Series?" which was definitely incorrect judging by her reaction ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“We talked until late”

We talked until late Is this sentence correct? It sounds strange to me but I'm not sure what's grammatically wrong about it. What about this? We talked into the night This sounds better to ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

“Wednesday week”

I know that the English will say "Wednesday week" to mean a week from Wednesday. Is there a name for this sort of construction? Also, I have a friend from India who will say "today morning". Is ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

“Planning for next year” vs. “planning for the next year”

I would like to start planning for next year. In the above sentence, there is no definite article before the words next year. Should it be present, as in the following sentence which sounds far ...
1
vote
4answers
148 views

Refer to the state of something “at the time”

I want to communicate this: I didn't think the zoo would attract visitors in its state at the time. What can I replace "state at the time" with? Perhaps something like "then-state"? I can't say ...
0
votes
3answers
546 views

Present Perfect or simple past?

A student has written: Still, I have already been aware of most of the information even before watching the video. It doesn't feel right and I would normally use a past simple here. I'm on my ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Today Was vs Today Is

If someone asks, "What day is it today?" and it is 10 pm, is it correct to respond with "Today was Tuesday." since the day is over and it's night? Is that response incorrect? Should the ...
13
votes
4answers
3k views

Why “half past” and not “half to”?

When telling time and 30 minutes has gone past an hour, we say “half past”. For instance, half past 4 or half past 5. Why can’t we also say “half to”. For instance, half to 5 or half to 6? Shouldn’t ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

“This summer” versus “last summer” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to? This is October. We went to the hill station this year's (2012) summer. Now, how do I say this to others. I have been saying this ...
3
votes
3answers
233 views

Generic time range word

I am looking for a word that can replace idioms like daily or monthly, but has the same meaning, and it's generic. By example, if I want to describe my pocket money, I can say I have a daily amount, ...
4
votes
0answers
15k views

“On time” vs. “in time” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “In time ” versus “on time” I don't know if there is any difference. Which of the following should I use? I'll be on time to catch the ...
1
vote
3answers
113 views

in early am or at early am (time)

Sexy, let’s go to AC for the whole night this or the following Friday night. We can leave around 8-9 pm and come back in early am. Is this correct?
5
votes
4answers
2k views

“At the end” or “in the end”

Which is correct? I am planning to buy some property at the end of 2011. I am planning to buy some property in the end of 2011.
5
votes
3answers
6k views

“At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?

At the beginning of the century. In the beginning of the century. How to clearly distinguish when to use at, or in?
9
votes
6answers
16k views

Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise?

The period between sunset and noon is called "morning", between noon and sunset is "afternoon". Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise? Edit/Clarification: Wikipedia defines ...
3
votes
1answer
854 views

How do you spell time specifications given in (military) “Zulu time”?

For an example, let's consider the time specification "1539Z". How do the people in the military spell that? "Fifteen thirty-nine Zulu"? "Fifteen thirty-nine zee"? "One fife tree niner zulu"? Are ...
2
votes
4answers
3k views

What is a word that means “a span of six months”?

Is there a word that means "a span of six months"? That is, I want to connote a stretch of time that lasts half a year, not an event that happens every six months.
3
votes
2answers
4k views

What's the origin of the idiom “don't give it the time of day”?

Twice in the past few hours, I've seen the idiom "don't give it the time of day". Now, I immediately knew and understood what the people using the phrase meant, but then I realized that I didn't know ...
0
votes
3answers
666 views

“Feeling safe? So do I!” — is this grammatical?

I have a small question regarding the usage of the present simple, present continuous and auxiliary verbs. Is this correct English? Feel safe? (Do you feel safe?) → So do I! Feeling safe? ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Is ‘then’ of ‘now and then’ past or future? [closed]

Then is commonly used for things happened in both the past and future. In the common phrase now and then, is then in the past or the future? Could anyone help?
1
vote
5answers
936 views

What is the formal version of “8 a.m. until”?

Is there a formal version of the term "until," used in the context of "The event will run from 8 a.m. until," signifying an indeterminate end time?