Tagged Questions

Topics related to time in written or spoken English

learn more… | top users | synonyms

4
votes
1answer
281 views

Outmoded word for “next Tuesday”

I am writing an email and wanted to refer to this coming Tuesday. The phrase "Tuesday est" popped into my mind (something Miss Marple might have said) but when I googled it I could find no reference. ...
4
votes
4answers
32k views

Does the term “within 7 days” mean include the 7th day? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”? The title states it all: When an author says "within 7 days", does the author mean ...
5
votes
3answers
566 views

How should I describe 2:45?

What is the most common way to express 2:45, using quarter, in the US? Quarter of three? Quarter to three? Quarter till three?
3
votes
2answers
1k views

“In second” or “in seconds” when talking about time [closed]

When talking about time as a unit, which one is correct, in second or in seconds? For example: How long does it take to complete the task in second? or How long does it take to complete the ...
2
votes
1answer
322 views

When can I omit “for” before a time duration?

Do not watch television [for] more than one hour a day. Is omitting the “for” okay or is that grammatically incorrect?
5
votes
3answers
15k views

“In the next two weeks” vs. “next two weeks”

Which one of the following is correct if the writer intends to say a week after next week? My friend and I decided to go to the beach in the next two weeks. My friend and I decided to go to ...
6
votes
8answers
10k views

Is it proper to use the word “bandwidth” as it relates to time allotment?

I'm a web developer and I've often heard other technical and developer types say: Sorry, I don't have the bandwidth to take on your project at this time. I started using the term myself and ...
1
vote
3answers
369 views

“One way would be” vs “One way will be”?

What is the difference between "One way would be" and "One way will be"? Can both of them be used for future actions?
3
votes
2answers
8k views

24 hour time. How to say it? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? Which words can be used to say time in 24 hour format? If, for instance, for 4:00 one might say "four o'clock", is it ...
1
vote
1answer
412 views

Time format “10 to 10”

Can someone tell what does this time format "10 to 10" mean? Is it 9:50 or 10:10?
4
votes
2answers
1k views

When did ironic use of “as in” start?

As far as I (as non-native speaker) understand the words as in, this is short for for instance, as in: Understanding “that” as in this statement It's my impression that at some point in time ...
1
vote
5answers
4k views

How to say that you are going to do something really soon? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Do it very quickly” vs “do it ASAP” Quite often I need to say that I will do something really soon - e.g. in a few hours, but not sure how much ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”?

Q1: "I'll finish this job within 5 days" definitely means the job is expected to cost 5 days or less. However, does "I'll finish this job in 5 days" mean exactly the same? Q2: Can we say, "I'll ...
-1
votes
3answers
7k views

Is the “will let you know afternoon” correct? [closed]

Which of the following are correct? Will let you know in the afternoon. Will let you know afternoon. Will let you know after noon.
-1
votes
1answer
464 views

Is preposition required before 'yesterday' in certain cases? [closed]

Is the following sentence correct? Last saved by Rod yesterday at 6:15 PM
3
votes
2answers
22k views

Should “Good Morning” always be used as the first greeting of the day? [closed]

Is it true that regardless of the time of the day, the first wish to a person must be Good morning? Even if I meet him in the afternoon?
2
votes
1answer
18k views

Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How obsolete is the word “overmorrow”? Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? Perhaps a term that has fallen out of modern English ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even ...
7
votes
3answers
11k views

What to reply to a person saying “Good Morning” when my time zone is different? [closed]

When I'm talking to a person in opposite time zone and the person greets with "Good morning" or Good evening/afternoon as per his time, is it ok to reply "Good afternoon" (as per my time-zone) when he ...
5
votes
4answers
3k views

Precise meaning of “Last N days, weeks, months or years”

Would phrases like these generally be considered inclusive of the current period? I think it's pretty clear that last week does not include the current week. But does last 2 weeks include the current ...
1
vote
3answers
918 views

British Railway Stations - How do Brits read railway time tables? [closed]

This question is related to two others referring to "how to speak out loud 24-hour clock times". It has been asked how do English-speaking countries that officially use the 24-hour clock system refer ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

Is it wrong to refer to 18:00hs as “eighteen hours” while in a 24-hour clock country? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? I was wondering if you could help me out with a matter that is bugging me. Do you think it is wrong to refer to ...
8
votes
7answers
41k views

Should I say “have a good night” at 5:00 PM?

We're off work at 5:00PM. I've never tried to say "have a good night" at this time of day. In fact, I wouldn't even say it at all unless I'd like to say it to someone who is heading to bed. When I'm ...
5
votes
6answers
1k views

How to use “summers ago”

It is November 2011 now. If I want to refer to something that happened in August 2009, which phrase do I use? two summers ago three summers ago Or is there a better phrase that conveys ...
2
votes
1answer
129 views

How do you refer to grouping numbers in lots of 60? [closed]

We have the term "metric" for things measured in decimal or powers of 1000: millimeter meter kilometer And the term "hexadecimal" for things measured in base 16. What term describes grouping ...
19
votes
13answers
2k views

What do you call the time period between notification of an event and the event?

I'm in the situation where I have an event, and I want to notify some people 15 minutes before that event happens (but it could be 30 minutes, or 1 day, or any amount of time). What do you call that ...
12
votes
3answers
851 views

Why is “Saturday” Romanic?

Sunday and Monday are named after the sun and moon (English < Germanic), and Tuesday through Friday are named after Anglo-Saxon/Germanic gods. This seems consistent enough so far, but then we come ...
3
votes
1answer
6k views

Why “a quarter of nine” to represent 8:45? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does 'ten of six' mean in regard to time? As a non-native speaker, I consider a quarter past nine (9:15) and a quarter to nine (8:45) easy to understand. ...
6
votes
2answers
4k views

How did “next day” come to mean “day of next week”?

This question touched on the confusion of the common usage of "next Tuesday" to really mean "Tuesday of next week", as opposed to the "soonest upcoming Tuesday". When one considers the actual ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What to call the collective parts of a day?

Millennia are made of centuries and decades, centuries of decades and years. Years are months, months of weeks, but not precisely. Days are made of hours, but what do we call the several imprecise ...
3
votes
3answers
681 views

Meaning of “we leave at eight thirty for nine”

In the expression we leave at eight thirty for nine, what time is the departure going to be?
19
votes
1answer
71k views

What is the proper name for “AM” and “PM”?

I know that AM/PM is for ante/post meridiem, but what is it actually called? Meridian indicator? 12 hour indicator? Something way more clever?
13
votes
7answers
13k views

How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation?

A couple years ago, I switched all my personal clocks 24-hour notation. I live in the US, and 24-hour time is used very, very rarely. So, I haven't been able to listen to anyone say times aloud. ...
3
votes
10answers
7k views

Is there a generic word in English that means “through time”?

I know "temporal" means "to do with time", but I'm looking specifically for a term that means "spanning time" or "over time". Not necessarily all time, as "eternal" would mean, nor do I want to ...
11
votes
3answers
43k views

What does the phrase “half seven” mean?

I've heard the British term "half seven" (or "half nine," "half five", etc) used to tell time. I can't remember though if it means 6:30 or 7:30 (i.e. half an hour before seven, or half past seven)? ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

“When” vs. “what time”

When are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? or What time are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? Please elaborate on the semantical differences.
6
votes
5answers
3k views

Can I use “as late as” to express a deadline?

You must submit your homework as late as tomorrow. Does the sentence have the same meaning as the following one? The deadline for your homework submission is tomorrow. To be specific, I ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

“Contemporary” vs. “contemporaneous”

What is the difference between these two words? contemporary: From the same time period, coexistent in time. contemporaneous: Existing or created in the same period of time. I know that ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Terms for “half a decade”

Is "lustrum" (pl. lustra) an understandable (say, at least in academic publications) or valid/common term for a five year span, e.g. to use in a table summarizing data where space can be very ...
34
votes
2answers
3k views

Is there a term to describe an event which happens every 18 months?

Obviously every year is annual. Every two years is biennial. Does the English language have a term for every 18 months?
10
votes
4answers
521 views

What exactly is “noonday night”?

In answering the question Is there a term for “midnight” that is like “noon”, I came across the phrase noonday night listed as a synonym for midnight in my copy of Roget's International ...
13
votes
8answers
27k views

Precise names for parts of a day

I have learnt these words so far, please correct me if I'm wrong: Dawn, maybe 4am–6am? Morning, maybe 6am–9am? The food for the morning is called breakfast. People greet each other Good morning! ...
2
votes
3answers
343 views

What is the origin of the term “in forever”?

Is it acceptable to use the term "in forever" when referring to a length of time, even though it is illogical? For example, "Ohmigosh, I haven't seen you in forever!" Or is this term one that we ...
2
votes
4answers
405 views

Is “time” needed in this sentence?

I must remember to bath within ten minutes time. Is the word "time" needed in this sentence, or is it superficial? Is it even wrong to remove it?
17
votes
4answers
1k views

Word for “distance in time”

I need the correct English word for the German expression (zeitlicher) Abstand. Abstand means "distance", and zeitlich means "in time". The "distance" between building maintenance dates is about ...
4
votes
3answers
971 views

Right format for time of day when corresponding with Germans

I'm writing to some German folks in English, and I'm referring to the time of day -- an event that starts at 10 o'clock in the morning. I know that if I were writing to other Americans, I'd use 10 ...
4
votes
2answers
9k views

Which is correct here: “*sometime* next month” vs. “*sometimes* next month”?

Are those expressions equivalent, or which one should be preferred? For instance: I should finish this work sometimes next week versus I should finish this work sometime next week
6
votes
7answers
1k views

Is there a single word for a “unit of time”?

If I were to have a text box for someone to enter an integer and dropdown list from which my user would select day(s), hour(s), minute(s) or second(s), is there a single word that would describe what ...
14
votes
4answers
31k views

AM/PM vs a.m./p.m. vs am/pm

I used to think PM/AM was correct, but at some point, I switched to using p.m./a.m. for reasons I can't recall. I know that in practical, casual writing, people tend to use whatever form is most ...