Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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3answers
99 views

Expression regarding a periodic task

So, if I have to do a certain task during a whole week but with a 3-week gap. For instance, in a 3-week period I will have to do that task for 1 week, in a 6-week period for 2 weeks, not in a row, of ...
3
votes
1answer
661 views

How do you spell time specifications given in (military) “Zulu time”?

For an example, let's consider the time specification "1539Z". How do the people in the military spell that? "Fifteen thirty-nine Zulu"? "Fifteen thirty-nine zee"? "One fife tree niner zulu"? Are ...
2
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4answers
2k views

What is a word that means “a span of six months”?

Is there a word that means "a span of six months"? That is, I want to connote a stretch of time that lasts half a year, not an event that happens every six months.
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3answers
578 views

“Feeling safe? So do I!” — is this grammatical?

I have a small question regarding the usage of the present simple, present continuous and auxiliary verbs. Is this correct English? Feel safe? (Do you feel safe?) → So do I! Feeling safe? ...
3
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2answers
3k views

What's the origin of the idiom “don't give it the time of day”?

Twice in the past few hours, I've seen the idiom "don't give it the time of day". Now, I immediately knew and understood what the people using the phrase meant, but then I realized that I didn't know ...
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4answers
5k views

What do you call “one hundredth of a second”?

As in: He broke the world record of 14.05 I tried searching Wikipedia and ended up with centisecond. It sounds so scientific. What is it called in colloquial English?
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2answers
807 views

Is ‘then’ of ‘now and then’ past or future? [closed]

Then is commonly used for things happened in both the past and future. In the common phrase now and then, is then in the past or the future? Could anyone help?
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3answers
1k views

using phrase “weekend of”

Say the 24th is a Monday and you say that you’ll be doing something the weekend of the 24th, meaning the 22nd and 23rd. Isn’t that incorrect? I would say the weekend of the 24th means the 29th and ...
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3answers
487 views

Present Perfect or simple past?

A student has written: Still, I have already been aware of most of the information even before watching the video. It doesn't feel right and I would normally use a past simple here. I'm on my ...
2
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4answers
114 views

Word usage: Date before

How one can say that a date must happen before other date, for intance: The X starting date should be prior to the Y starting date. Is this sentence idiomatic or there is another way of stating ...
7
votes
5answers
33k views

“For the time being” vs. “for now”

Consider the following passages: A litter made of two rifles and two field jackets would suffice for now. That was good news; another bit was that the EPW was a lieutenant, a regimental REMF ...
5
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2answers
742 views

Is there a word that means near-daily?

I am trying to write a document that describes the frequency with which we perform a task. It is usually done daily, however I don't want to be tied to having to do it daily. Is there a more ...
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5answers
2k views

The difference between “take” and “last”

We say: "the meeting will last two hours". But we say: "how long does the flight take?" Please let me know the difference between last and take and when we should use each.
2
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0answers
32 views

24-hours notice vs. 24-hour's notice vs. 24-hours' notice [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Phrasing “An hour's rest” In the sentence "You must provide 24-hours notice." which is correct: 24-hours notice 24-hour's notice 24-hours' notice
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4answers
2k views

Single word for “time spent” [closed]

Is there a single word for an amount of time spent on a task for example? More specific than duration?
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1answer
2k views

Difference between “term” and “period”

What is the difference between term and period in meaning distance in time? Is it possible to use one or both of them when we describe a point in time (We have time till 1st of December so we have ...
4
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2answers
243 views

Two technical times in one sentence

Which of these sentences should I use? Algorithms 1 and 2 work in time O(n) and O(n^2) respectively. Or Algorithms 1 and 2 work in times O(n) and O(n^2) respectively.
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6answers
11k views

Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise?

The period between sunset and noon is called "morning", between noon and sunset is "afternoon". Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise? Edit/Clarification: Wikipedia defines ...
11
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6answers
2k views

Can “crepuscular” and/or “twilight” apply to morning half-light as well as in the evening

I know that's "sorta" two questions in one, but I'm stuck in an argument with a guy who says both words can apply to morning half-light. I disagree and think both only apply in the evening. I think ...
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1answer
358 views

The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis

Which of the following is correct? We hire our bicycle... by the hour. by hours. by an hour. for hours.
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9answers
5k views

Alternatives to “Good Night” when sleeping in the afternoon

It seems to be a silly question but I was puzzled when somebody bid me good night, when I was going to sleep at 1:00 PM. If somebody goes to sleep in the afternoon, is it correct to bid him "good ...
1
vote
1answer
250 views

Correct use of “before” & “from”?

I came across this sentence in a newspaper: Five minutes from the end I didn't think we could win this game.We deserved to win this championship. I am confused as to why he uses from the end. ...
0
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2answers
3k views

Meaning of “10 of 8”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What does 'ten of six' mean in regard to time? In a Family Guy episode (The Hand That Rocks The Wheelchair), Meg asks "is it 10 of 8?", apparently looking up at ...
4
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4answers
2k views

“Wednesday week”

I know that the English will say "Wednesday week" to mean a week from Wednesday. Is there a name for this sort of construction? Also, I have a friend from India who will say "today morning". Is ...
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1answer
2k views

“At day five”, “on day five”, or something else?

When considering a set of days and writing about them in a 'diary mode', what preposition should I use in the following example: He died at day 5 of the treatment. He died on day 5 of the ...
1
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0answers
59 views

“Please finish this by May 15” — can I still do it today? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? Today is May 15. I have an email in my inbox that says Please respond by May 15. My question is: what ...
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4answers
5k views

Might “see you shortly” be used to mean in a week's time?

I wonder if it's appropriate to say "see you shortly" when we both know that it's going to happen in a week's time. What I'm trying to say is that I'm looking forward to see the person, but I already ...
4
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0answers
15k views

“On time” vs. “in time” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “In time ” versus “on time” I don't know if there is any difference. Which of the following should I use? I'll be on time to catch the ...
6
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3answers
3k views

Is it correct to say “12:00am”?

I've read in various places the first minute of a day described as 12:00am. Now, whilst I personally prefer to use 24h clock notation and therefore don't have this problem as I can simply describe ...
2
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2answers
6k views

What does 'later this month' mean?

If today were April 30 (actually it is), what does 'later this month' mean? If today were April 15, what does 'later this month' mean? If today were April 1, what does 'later this month' mean? ADD: ...
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2answers
196 views

Describing the preference of some time period's being closer to another time period that it forgoes [closed]

Just asked this question on "Christianity", but feel asked it in a very awkward way: Do we have any evidence that Martin Luther considered some individuals of the Roman Catholic clergy living in ...
2
votes
0answers
89 views

Is “do something by date X” inclusive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? For example, if John says: Return it to me by March 24th. Does it mean that I need to return it to ...
4
votes
1answer
274 views

Outmoded word for “next Tuesday”

I am writing an email and wanted to refer to this coming Tuesday. The phrase "Tuesday est" popped into my mind (something Miss Marple might have said) but when I googled it I could find no reference. ...
4
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4answers
27k views

Does the term “within 7 days” mean include the 7th day? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”? The title states it all: When an author says "within 7 days", does the author mean ...
5
votes
3answers
473 views

How should I describe 2:45?

What is the most common way to express 2:45, using quarter, in the US? Quarter of three? Quarter to three? Quarter till three?
3
votes
2answers
972 views

“In second” or “in seconds” when talking about time [closed]

When talking about time as a unit, which one is correct, in second or in seconds? For example: How long does it take to complete the task in second? or How long does it take to complete the ...
2
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1answer
307 views

When can I omit “for” before a time duration?

Do not watch television [for] more than one hour a day. Is omitting the “for” okay or is that grammatically incorrect?
5
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3answers
13k views

“In the next two weeks” vs. “next two weeks”

Which one of the following is correct if the writer intends to say a week after next week? My friend and I decided to go to the beach in the next two weeks. My friend and I decided to go to ...
6
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8answers
8k views

Is it proper to use the word “bandwidth” as it relates to time allotment?

I'm a web developer and I've often heard other technical and developer types say: Sorry, I don't have the bandwidth to take on your project at this time. I started using the term myself and ...
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3answers
361 views

“One way would be” vs “One way will be”?

What is the difference between "One way would be" and "One way will be"? Can both of them be used for future actions?
3
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2answers
7k views

24 hour time. How to say it? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? Which words can be used to say time in 24 hour format? If, for instance, for 4:00 one might say "four o'clock", is it ...
1
vote
1answer
360 views

Time format “10 to 10”

Can someone tell what does this time format "10 to 10" mean? Is it 9:50 or 10:10?
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2answers
1k views

When did ironic use of “as in” start?

As far as I (as non-native speaker) understand the words as in, this is short for for instance, as in: Understanding “that” as in this statement It's my impression that at some point in time ...
1
vote
5answers
4k views

How to say that you are going to do something really soon? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Do it very quickly” vs “do it ASAP” Quite often I need to say that I will do something really soon - e.g. in a few hours, but not sure how much ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”?

Q1: "I'll finish this job within 5 days" definitely means the job is expected to cost 5 days or less. However, does "I'll finish this job in 5 days" mean exactly the same? Q2: Can we say, "I'll ...
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3answers
6k views

Is the “will let you know afternoon” correct? [closed]

Which of the following are correct? Will let you know in the afternoon. Will let you know afternoon. Will let you know after noon.
-1
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1answer
407 views

Is preposition required before 'yesterday' in certain cases? [closed]

Is the following sentence correct? Last saved by Rod yesterday at 6:15 PM
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2answers
19k views

Should “Good Morning” always be used as the first greeting of the day? [closed]

Is it true that regardless of the time of the day, the first wish to a person must be Good morning? Even if I meet him in the afternoon?
2
votes
1answer
17k views

Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How obsolete is the word “overmorrow”? Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? Perhaps a term that has fallen out of modern English ...
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2answers
1k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even ...