Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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0
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1answer
134 views

Would “pentaminutely” reflect an event that occurs every five minutes?

Would the compound pentaminutely (from penta- and minutely) be correct in describing an event that occurs every five-minutes? Or is there a better word? Edit: For clarity, I'm looking to name an ...
4
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5answers
6k views

“Good night” or “good evening”?

If it's 7:30pm, which of these phrases is correct, Good night or Good evening?
2
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5answers
4k views

What is an appropriate greeting to use at night time? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Good night” or “good evening”? I am in the process of creating a software application which displays a greeting to users based on the time of day. I have come to a ...
4
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3answers
1k views

Has the use of the idiom “last week” surpassed the use of the correct “yester-week”?

In his book Write It Right, which was published in 1909 -– a hundred years ago -- Ambrose Bierce disagreed with the usage of the words “Last” and “Past” with “week”. He explained : Last and Past. ...
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1answer
2k views

Is “even when” a conjunction?

Does even when grammatically work the same as even though and even if work? Or is it more of a time expression? Following the rules is essential, even when it’s difficult. Following the rules is ...
2
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0answers
87 views

Is “do something by date X” inclusive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? For example, if John says: Return it to me by March 24th. Does it mean that I need to return it to ...
1
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0answers
58 views

“Please finish this by May 15” — can I still do it today? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? Today is May 15. I have an email in my inbox that says Please respond by May 15. My question is: what ...
6
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1answer
790 views

What is the difference between yesterday and one day ago?

Do yesterday and one day ago refer to the same time period? If no, what is the difference?
5
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1answer
801 views

When is Christmas Eve Eve?

I have recently seen weather forecasters making predictions for Christmas Eve Day, Christmas Eve Night, and for Christmas Day. One also reads of Christmas Eve Eve, with two eves. Are those all ...
20
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5answers
2k views

What method of counting puts Twelfth Night on January 6th?

I know English has (or at least had) some strange usages of eve and night, but I still can’t figure out how December 25th and 12 can be combined to come up with January 6th. (This stems from my ...
4
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7answers
4k views

Is “yesterday night” acceptable?

I catch a lot of grief about this from family and friends, so I figured I'd settle the score once and for all. In verbal context (though not written), I tend to use the phrase ... yesterday ...
10
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4answers
454 views

What exactly is “noonday night”?

In answering the question Is there a term for “midnight” that is like “noon”, I came across the phrase noonday night listed as a synonym for midnight in my copy of Roget's International ...
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2answers
744 views

What to call the collective parts of a day?

Millennia are made of centuries and decades, centuries of decades and years. Years are months, months of weeks, but not precisely. Days are made of hours, but what do we call the several imprecise ...
5
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2answers
619 views

Is there a word that means near-daily?

I am trying to write a document that describes the frequency with which we perform a task. It is usually done daily, however I don't want to be tied to having to do it daily. Is there a more ...
8
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2answers
1k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even ...
11
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6answers
1k views

Can “crepuscular” and/or “twilight” apply to morning half-light as well as in the evening

I know that's "sorta" two questions in one, but I'm stuck in an argument with a guy who says both words can apply to morning half-light. I disagree and think both only apply in the evening. I think ...
7
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7answers
30k views

Should I say “have a good night” at 5:00 PM?

We're off work at 5:00PM. I've never tried to say "have a good night" at this time of day. In fact, I wouldn't even say it at all unless I'd like to say it to someone who is heading to bed. When I'm ...
6
votes
1answer
752 views

Question about the future “tense”

My daughter, who is in the 4th grade, was asked to answer questions about the following sentence: What time can you meet us at the school on Tuesday? She was asked questions about the usage of ...
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2answers
93 views

Is there a term for the other 2 months in a quarter?

The organization I work for has monthly volunteer opportunities, and quarterly volunteer opportunities. The trouble comes when someone serves quarterly (say, the 1st Monday of each quarter) and we ...
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2answers
1k views

Is “since so long” correct?

Because of our negligence towards the issue since so long, ... Am I using this correctly? I want to convey something like 1-2 months ago or since around September.
12
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3answers
698 views

Why is “Saturday” Romanic?

Sunday and Monday are named after the sun and moon (English < Germanic), and Tuesday through Friday are named after Anglo-Saxon/Germanic gods. This seems consistent enough so far, but then we come ...
2
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3answers
229 views

Right use of expressions like 'Is today any match'? [closed]

I recently went to the US and one day I was talking with one of my colleagues about sports and I asked "Is today any match of World Series?" which was definitely incorrect judging by her reaction ...
3
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2answers
649 views

“We talked until late”

We talked until late Is this sentence correct? It sounds strange to me but I'm not sure what's grammatically wrong about it. What about this? We talked into the night This sounds better to ...
4
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4answers
2k views

“Wednesday week”

I know that the English will say "Wednesday week" to mean a week from Wednesday. Is there a name for this sort of construction? Also, I have a friend from India who will say "today morning". Is ...
2
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4answers
956 views

“Planning for next year” vs. “planning for the next year”

I would like to start planning for next year. In the above sentence, there is no definite article before the words next year. Should it be present, as in the following sentence which sounds far ...
1
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4answers
109 views

Refer to the state of something “at the time”

I want to communicate this: I didn't think the zoo would attract visitors in its state at the time. What can I replace "state at the time" with? Perhaps something like "then-state"? I can't say ...
0
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3answers
453 views

Present Perfect or simple past?

A student has written: Still, I have already been aware of most of the information even before watching the video. It doesn't feel right and I would normally use a past simple here. I'm on my ...
1
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2answers
924 views

Today Was vs Today Is

If someone asks, "What day is it today?" and it is 10 pm, is it correct to respond with "Today was Tuesday." since the day is over and it's night? Is that response incorrect? Should the ...
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4answers
2k views

Why “half past” and not “half to”?

When telling time and 30 minutes has gone past an hour, we say “half past”. For instance, half past 4 or half past 5. Why can’t we also say “half to”. For instance, half to 5 or half to 6? Shouldn’t ...
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3answers
2k views

“This summer” versus “last summer” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to? This is October. We went to the hill station this year's (2012) summer. Now, how do I say this to others. I have been saying this ...
2
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3answers
163 views

Generic time range word

I am looking for a word that can replace idioms like daily or monthly, but has the same meaning, and it's generic. By example, if I want to describe my pocket money, I can say I have a daily amount, ...
4
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0answers
15k views

“On time” vs. “in time” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “In time ” versus “on time” I don't know if there is any difference. Which of the following should I use? I'll be on time to catch the ...
1
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3answers
106 views

in early am or at early am (time)

Sexy, let’s go to AC for the whole night this or the following Friday night. We can leave around 8-9 pm and come back in early am. Is this correct?
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4answers
1k views

“At the end” or “in the end”

Which is correct? I am planning to buy some property at the end of 2011. I am planning to buy some property in the end of 2011.
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3answers
4k views

“At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?

At the beginning of the century. In the beginning of the century. How to clearly distinguish when to use at, or in?
0
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3answers
84 views

Expression regarding a periodic task

So, if I have to do a certain task during a whole week but with a 3-week gap. For instance, in a 3-week period I will have to do that task for 1 week, in a 6-week period for 2 weeks, not in a row, of ...
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6answers
8k views

Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise?

The period between sunset and noon is called "morning", between noon and sunset is "afternoon". Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise? Edit/Clarification: Wikipedia defines ...
2
votes
1answer
554 views

How do you spell time specifications given in (military) “Zulu time”?

For an example, let's consider the time specification "1539Z". How do the people in the military spell that? "Fifteen thirty-nine Zulu"? "Fifteen thirty-nine zee"? "One fife tree niner zulu"? Are ...
2
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4answers
1k views

What is a word that means “a span of six months”?

Is there a word that means "a span of six months"? That is, I want to connote a stretch of time that lasts half a year, not an event that happens every six months.
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2answers
2k views

What's the origin of the idiom “don't give it the time of day”?

Twice in the past few hours, I've seen the idiom "don't give it the time of day". Now, I immediately knew and understood what the people using the phrase meant, but then I realized that I didn't know ...
0
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3answers
477 views

“Feeling safe? So do I!” — is this grammatical?

I have a small question regarding the usage of the present simple, present continuous and auxiliary verbs. Is this correct English? Feel safe? (Do you feel safe?) → So do I! Feeling safe? ...
19
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13answers
2k views

What do you call the time period between notification of an event and the event?

I'm in the situation where I have an event, and I want to notify some people 15 minutes before that event happens (but it could be 30 minutes, or 1 day, or any amount of time). What do you call that ...
1
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2answers
646 views

Is ‘then’ of ‘now and then’ past or future? [closed]

Then is commonly used for things happened in both the past and future. In the common phrase now and then, is then in the past or the future? Could anyone help?
1
vote
5answers
651 views

What is the formal version of “8 a.m. until”?

Is there a formal version of the term "until," used in the context of "The event will run from 8 a.m. until," signifying an indeterminate end time?
3
votes
3answers
961 views

using phrase “weekend of”

Say the 24th is a Monday and you say that you’ll be doing something the weekend of the 24th, meaning the 22nd and 23rd. Isn’t that incorrect? I would say the weekend of the 24th means the 29th and ...
34
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2answers
3k views

Is there a term to describe an event which happens every 18 months?

Obviously every year is annual. Every two years is biennial. Does the English language have a term for every 18 months?
2
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4answers
110 views

Word usage: Date before

How one can say that a date must happen before other date, for intance: The X starting date should be prior to the Y starting date. Is this sentence idiomatic or there is another way of stating ...
2
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0answers
32 views

24-hours notice vs. 24-hour's notice vs. 24-hours' notice [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Phrasing “An hour's rest” In the sentence "You must provide 24-hours notice." which is correct: 24-hours notice 24-hour's notice 24-hours' notice
1
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1answer
2k views

Difference between “term” and “period”

What is the difference between term and period in meaning distance in time? Is it possible to use one or both of them when we describe a point in time (We have time till 1st of December so we have ...
1
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4answers
2k views

Single word for “time spent” [closed]

Is there a single word for an amount of time spent on a task for example? More specific than duration?