Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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1answer
91 views

Frequency: Every three weeks or more / At least every three weeks / etc

I would like to express that an action should be done every three weeks, but that longer periods are also acceptable. Which of the following is the simplest, clearest, and most natural way to express ...
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3answers
136 views

'Eventually' — in the past or by some point in the future

Consider the following exchange: Alice: Did Charlotte send you that email? Bob: No, but I'm sure she'll send it eventually. In this case, there's no upper bound on the period of time in which ...
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2answers
80 views

Word for a “waypoint” but along a time dimension?

I want to be able to say 'After the process has begun, there are these time waypoints of 10 seconds, 30 seconds and 70 seconds from the start where I want this action to be performed.' I suppose I ...
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3answers
1k views

What time is 12.00pm? [duplicate]

There is a sign outside a shop near us which says 'Parking for loading vehicles only from 7 to 12pm'. Does that mean between 7pm and midnight, or between 7am and noon? For me 12.00 is neither ...
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2answers
4k views

When can I use “have a good day”?

I just want to ask if when would be the exact time to use have a good day? Because someone told me that the appropriate time would be in morning. Is that correct?
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3answers
10k views

Proper Timezone Acronym Usage - PT vs PDT or PST

What is the difference with using PT (Pacific Time) vs PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) or PST (Pacific Standard Time)? When you write the time, 2:00pm PT, would that be considered incorrect because it is ...
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6answers
6k views

“Since”, “until”, “from”, “to” on invoices or date ranges of a form

Which is the correct form on an invoice, or a general date range in a form, and why? Monkey dolls 12 GBP From 2012-01-03 to 2013-01-02 Monkey dolls 12 ...
4
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3answers
322 views

Payment to be due within three months “of” that meeting

Does the word "of" in the context of an established point in time refer to before or after that established point in time?
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4answers
26k views

Does the term “within 7 days” mean include the 7th day? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”? The title states it all: When an author says "within 7 days", does the author mean ...
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4answers
2k views

Precise meaning of “Last N days, weeks, months or years”

Would phrases like these generally be considered inclusive of the current period? I think it's pretty clear that last week does not include the current week. But does last 2 weeks include the current ...
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3answers
16k views

Is there a version of brunch for a meal between dinner and lunch?

Brunch has become quite a common word in the English language. Is there a similar word for a meal in place of dinner and lunch? (A phrase will also do).
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6answers
695 views

What is “long” doing in “all (time-period) long”?

What part of speech is long playing the part of in the bold parts of the quotations below? For one thing, it shows at a glance how much money is on hand for any particular purpose all month long. ...
0
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1answer
107 views

Is the expression “for all time” correct?

I'd like to know what's the correct usage of the expression "for all time". In particular in this sentence: "she cried for all time" (it's about a girl who took a plane and cried during the whole ...
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4answers
24k views

AM/PM vs a.m./p.m. vs am/pm

I used to think PM/AM was correct, but at some point, I switched to using p.m./a.m. for reasons I can't recall. I know that in practical, casual writing, people tend to use whatever form is most ...
1
vote
1answer
321 views

I knew it already 20 yrs ago vs I knew it as early as 20 yrs ago

I know that "already" is mainly used with present perfect. I want to emphasise that something was known 20 years ago. Are the following the same? I knew it already 20 yrs ago I knew it as early ...
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votes
3answers
12k views

“In the next two weeks” vs. “next two weeks”

Which one of the following is correct if the writer intends to say a week after next week? My friend and I decided to go to the beach in the next two weeks. My friend and I decided to go to ...
3
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2answers
304 views

Time: Move “backwards” or “forwards”

Let us pay attention to the terms back and forward in the quote below. On the 4th of June they had the drill for independence day. But if you go back further you'd find that around mid-May, they ...
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2answers
316 views

Every 30 minutes on the sharp

If the firework happens every 30 minutes from 7:00 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, ... 19:00 Can I say: There will be a fireworks display every half hour on the sharp.
2
votes
1answer
73 views

Can I refer to a period of more than 24 hours as “my day”?

Can I use "my day" to refer to a period of more than 24 hours? Let's say I worked non-stop for 30 hours, could I refer to this period as "my day"? From a dictionary, the only two usages I was able to ...
0
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1answer
1k views

Using 'few months back' and 'few months ago'

While I have grown up knowing that 'ago' is the word of choice while referring to an earlier timeline.now I have become quite confused with the regular use of 'back' in its place. Many say that 'ago' ...
3
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6answers
179 views

How can I refer to a period of day when people are awake/active?

The context is comparing air travel vs overnight train travel. In this case, air travel takes 1 hour, plus time required to travel from city to airport, arrive early for check-in & security, then ...
0
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2answers
206 views

Past perfect/simple question in an example

Talking about the trip I did a few years ago: I have been there and it was amazing. I had not seen a frozen sea until that time! Did I use past perfect correctly or should I just say "I did not ...
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3answers
328 views

What are valid time-periods that can be used in the phrase “the other ________”?

"the other day" is a pretty standard and understood phrase. It usually translates to "on a recent day". So you could say "I was talking to Rachel the other day..." which would mean "I was talking to ...
2
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3answers
754 views

Is it ever correct to use “end” after the name of a month?

I’ve heard some people say things like September end or June end when I’m used to hearing the end of September or the end of June. Is the former usage (meaning, the “something end” collocation) ...
0
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1answer
718 views

Is the following idiomatic English: “At what time do you go to sleep?”

I once asked some English people the following question: "At what time do you go to sleep?" They gave me a blank stare. You see, I tried to avoid the standard expression "At what time do you go to ...
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5answers
18k views

What does 'ten of six' mean in regard to time?

I am referring of course to the expression describing time. Today a corporate trainer (From north Philadelphia) that is teaching a class at my company used it in the context that the current time was ...
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3answers
898 views

Word meaning “close in time, or presently happening”

Is there a word that can be used to describe something that is either close in time, or currently happening? Something like "proximate" or "imminent", but without the implication that the thing has ...
3
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1answer
75 views

applying modern standards / morals to a past era

Is there a word for "applying modern standards / morals to a past era"? Something like "anachronism" but not quite. An example of this would be to criticize a public figure from centuries ago for ...
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2answers
159 views

Not shifting the adverbial of time in reported speech

I know that generally, in reported speech e.g. tomorrow shifts to "the following day". But I also know that in some cases it can remain, e.g: He said he would do that tomorrow. That one should ...
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4answers
372 views

Describing event with “greatest” date value

I'm struggling with a way to describe one of a series of datetime values that has the greatest value. My first thought would be to call it the "latest", but the suggests that the event is in the ...
2
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2answers
1k views

'have been' vs. 'went' with time words

Sometimes I see the following in ESL learners' writing: I have been to America two years ago. Am I correct in saying that it should be: I have been to America. I went to America two ...
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9answers
5k views

Alternatives to “Good Night” when sleeping in the afternoon

It seems to be a silly question but I was puzzled when somebody bid me good night, when I was going to sleep at 1:00 PM. If somebody goes to sleep in the afternoon, is it correct to bid him "good ...
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1answer
191 views

Using prepositions with time

Which is the correct preposition? "at evening", "on evening", or "in the evening". Is this correct-"He mailed me (on evening / in the evening / at evening)"? How are prepositions used with time?
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5answers
1k views

The ambiguous “until”

As a non-native English speaker, It seems to me that the word "until" is quite ambiguous. It's been told that when it's used with a date it includes the date. (Does "until [date]" mean ...
2
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1answer
77 views

“Thence” to allude to the past

I see that "hence" means roughly "from this fact/time/place/source", while "thence" means roughly "from that fact/time/place/source". Usage such as "half an hour hence" is typically (although perhaps ...
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1answer
467 views

In the past 2 years [duplicate]

We are now at year 2013. What does it mean by saying in the past 2 years?Whats the period it refering to?
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2answers
308 views

will be repaired in x weeks' time: how precise/vague is it? [closed]

(I have completely rewritten the question in an attempt to make it clearer) In a certain British English exam, you are given a statement, and must then go through three sentences and choose the one ...
0
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1answer
370 views

Present Perfect after “before”

I've been watching a TV show recently and in one of the episodes the following is being said: I don't want half my army killed before I've crossed the Narrow Sea. In the second part of the ...
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2answers
3k views

How did “next day” come to mean “day of next week”?

This question touched on the confusion of the common usage of "next Tuesday" to really mean "Tuesday of next week", as opposed to the "soonest upcoming Tuesday". When one considers the actual ...
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1answer
54k views

What is the proper name for “AM” and “PM”?

I know that AM/PM is for ante/post meridiem, but what is it actually called? Meridian indicator? 12 hour indicator? Something way more clever?
5
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2answers
597 views

Why are the notes or protocol of a meeting referred to as its 'minutes'?

A minute is 60 seconds. Something 'minute' is small, minor, perhaps short. Now, what about the minutes of a meeting or a session? As in, its written protocol? Are they called that because: The ...
0
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1answer
74 views

make question for periodic event

I like to make question about the happening of some events whether it is happened every day or every week or every month...etc how can i make question? this is my try: Does this event happen every ...
8
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2answers
357 views

Drink 7 to 10 days after opening?

Is this label telling the consumer that it is best to consume the drink 7 to 10 days after opening it? I know what they are getting at, but I feel like it should say "Best if consumed within 7 to ...
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votes
1answer
218 views

How to say years period [closed]

I have trouble with a phrase: Potential investors study were carried out for the period 2008 - 2012. This should mean that I've analyzed a documents published between 2008 and 2012. Is this the ...
3
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10answers
6k views

Is there a generic word in English that means “through time”?

I know "temporal" means "to do with time", but I'm looking specifically for a term that means "spanning time" or "over time". Not necessarily all time, as "eternal" would mean, nor do I want to ...
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5answers
3k views

Can I use “as late as” to express a deadline?

You must submit your homework as late as tomorrow. Does the sentence have the same meaning as the following one? The deadline for your homework submission is tomorrow. To be specific, I ...
0
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1answer
819 views

Do you say “thirty past six”?

When telling the time, are the following expressions legal or natural to native speakers: e.g.: 1. It's thirty past six (without adding "minutes"). 2. It's half an hour past six (adding "an hour"). ...
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2answers
650 views

Is there a word for start and end of a time period? [closed]

Is there a word used to describe the extremities of an arbitrary time period? The word "weekend" refers to the end of a week, but it's limited to the week and it only describes the end, but not the ...
0
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3answers
191 views

Conventions for dates spoken without year

Today is April 4th, 2013. What is meant when someone says "May 1st"? I would assume its May 1, 2013. And "last May 1st" as May 1, 2012. As for "next May 1st", I would assume "next" is a redundancy ...
2
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1answer
16k views

Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How obsolete is the word “overmorrow”? Is there a one-word English term for the day after tomorrow? Perhaps a term that has fallen out of modern English ...