Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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0answers
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what is correct for next monday - this monday coming or referring to monday week? [duplicate]

what is correct for next monday - this monday coming or referring to monday week? Then we have the problem saying monday after next......obviously referring to monday week
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1answer
120 views

Telling the time [closed]

In Ireland we say: "Twenty-five to ten" (9:35) (21:35) "Twenty to ten" (9:40) (21:40) "A quarter to ten" (9:45) (21:45) "Ten to ten" (9:50) (21:50) "Five to ten" (9:55) (21:55) "Ten o'clock" or just ...
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1answer
174 views

“Four years are” vs. “four years is” [duplicate]

An exam question is driving me crazy. Find the mistake in the following: Four years are a long time to spend away from family and friends. Literally everyone solved it by replacing are with ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Verbs that follow an amount of time, singular or plural? [duplicate]

Which one is grammatically correct? One hour and a half is all you have left. One hour and a half are all you have left. Two hours is all you have left. Two hours are all you have left. ...
3
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5answers
281 views

“Your 1 hour 6 minutes are up” / “Your 1 hour 6 minutes is up”

I'm not sure which of these is more correct. Your 1 hour is up. This is easy. Singular. Your 5 minutes are up Again, simple enough. Plural. Your 1 hour and 6 minutes is up. Your 3 ...
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1answer
64 views

Is it Game time or game-time? [duplicate]

I'm trying to verify the correctness the following sentence: Game time is Sunday. Is it correct or should it be "Game-time"?
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2answers
324 views

How do you denote date and time in written English?

I always wonder how to denote date and time when I have to make an appointment. To make sure that I don't make typos, I always mention the weekday. What is the correct way to do so? Appointment at ...
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3answers
125 views

Period of time, a bit or a while

If I want to place my luggage at the hotel for a few hours, how is it best to ask if I can do this? Should I ask the receptionist: "Can I place my luggage here a bit?" or "Can I place my luggage ...
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2answers
62 views

Hour minute format pluralization in a specific context

Check the following screens: https://www.dropbox.com/s/bp40q2yqk4xatzc/11.png https://www.dropbox.com/s/cobof2uvk6htwv9/1.png you can see that I'm not consistent with the hour format. My question ...
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1answer
763 views

Position of “now” in a sentence [closed]

What is the correct position of "now" in the following sentence. What is the rule for this? We now consider the second case. We consider now the second case. We consider the second case now. Now we ...
1
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1answer
89 views

“Obama is in town this weekend” or “Obama will be in town this weekend” [duplicate]

A friend of mine used the following phrase to tell me about Obama's visit to Malaysia this weekend (he told me this when it was not already the weekend): Obama is in town this weekend. This ...
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3answers
910 views

Variations in meaning between “Last week” vs. “The last week” vs “The last n weeks”? [duplicate]

Similarly between "Last month" and "The last month". Last week implies, at some point during the previous week. Not inclusive of the current week. What exactly does the last week mean? Is that ...
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4answers
79 views

Short for “time period in life” like teenage

I am looking for a word to describe a time period in life, like teenage, but that would work for any time period, like 11 – 22. I want to say it is xxxxxx in everyone's life.
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2answers
238 views

An adjective to describe the benefits associated with saving time

I'm looking for an adjective to replace 'time saving' in the following sentence: "...a range of immediate and tangible time-saving and economic benefits" I'm thinking it should be something like ...
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3answers
12k views

Does “within an hour” mean before, after, or both?

Does within mean before or after? Or does it mean both? For example, Do not drink or eat within an hour of these pills.
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2answers
3k views

'Tonight' and 'this evening'

If I ask Are you available tonight for a drink? does tonight refer to this evening and/or this night? If not, what would be considered the beginning of the night and the end of the evening? Do ...
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1answer
501 views

What is correct: still to be/continue to be/should be/must be? [closed]

I want to build a sentence referring to the past, present and future: The Bible was, and continues to be, instrumental in spreading God's message to mankind. The Bible was, and should still be, ...
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3answers
10k views

Saying “today morning” to mean “this morning”

As an American, I use the term this morning, but I’ve noticed some Asian Indian coworkers who always say today morning to mean what I mean by this morning. Is this an Indian English “dialectism”? Is ...
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1answer
208 views

Use of “last year” and “last one year”?

The term last year defines last year according to calender.So if I say last year in 2014, it means I refer to 2013. On the other hand, the term last one year refers to last 12 months.So if I use this ...
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2answers
32 views

“as she did X” vs “while she did X”

Another question related to correctly conveying a sense of time: Who will be held accountable for the costs incurred as the managers dragged their feet? vs Who will be held accountable for ...
2
votes
2answers
37 views

“cost incurred before” vs “cost incurred until”?

I am wondering which of the following is correct/preferable: We need to take into account the cost incurred until action is finally taken. vs We need to account for the cost incurred ...
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7answers
31k views

“In time” versus “on time”

Which one is correct: Submit your work in time. Submit your work on time.
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2answers
222 views

What is the correct adjective that describes the temporal proximity between the two events?

I'm trying to find the best adjective to describe the temporal proximity between the two events: the creation of two WiFi networks. Currently I'm using almost concurrent to describe the proximity: ...
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1answer
78 views

Writing deadlines

I'm currently using the following date format for setting deadlines: Monday, 27 January 2014, 3 PM My questions are: Should I mention time at the beginning or leave it at the end? Should I ...
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3answers
10k views

“an hour and a half” or “one and a half hours”

Are both "an hour and a half" and "one and a half hours" correct? If so, is either more appropriate in different contexts? Example context: "The Superbowl starts in less than one and a half ...
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19answers
7k views

Single word for a very small amount of time [closed]

In French, if I want to quantify a very small amount of time (but not fixed: it can be 5 ms or 0.1 ms) I can use a pouième. Is there an equivalent in English? I'm not looking for an expression but ...
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2answers
93 views

“Leave for <time>”

What is the meaning of the following? You have to leave for six thirty. (p.m. implied) Does it mean you have to leave for your destination at 6:30 p.m.? Or does it mean that you have arrive at ...
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4answers
696 views

Statement of fact: future simple

Why is the simple future used in the following sentence instead of the simple present? A client software will not transfer files.
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3answers
177 views

The single word for “Volume per second”

Will anybody be able to mention the English word for "Volume per second (or preferably Volume per Time unit) or "Amount of task per a second"? Thank you.
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0answers
916 views

What does “within 30 days of assuming command” mean? [duplicate]

An Army regulation requires somthing to be done "within 30 days of assuming command". Does that mean it must be done within the time window of the day of assuming command plus 30? Or, does it mean ...
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4answers
6k views

What do you call “one hundredth of a second”?

As in: He broke the world record of 14.05 I tried searching Wikipedia and ended up with centisecond. It sounds so scientific. What is it called in colloquial English?
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1answer
216 views

Telling the time “3:15” in American English

Which of the followings is the most common way to say 3:15 in American English? A quarter past three A quarter after three Three fifteen Also, in the last example "three fifteen", ...
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1answer
2k views

usage of “at the latest” when expressing time

When using "at the latest", is this correct usage? "I will be in around 10am or 11am at the latest".
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2answers
215 views

After 13 years in the 21st century, what conclusion have we come to regarding the short forms of the names of the years?

Do you remember the other Year 2000 problem, regarding the nicknames of the years? If 1999 was "ninety-nine," then what would we call 2001? At the time, answers such as "one", "oh-one", "two-oh-one" ...
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6answers
12k views

Do I spell out a time in an essay?

When I am writing an essay, do I spell out times? How would I write AM or PM? Example: 11:45 PM How would I write that?
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8answers
10k views

Is it proper to use the word “bandwidth” as it relates to time allotment?

I'm a web developer and I've often heard other technical and developer types say: Sorry, I don't have the bandwidth to take on your project at this time. I started using the term myself and ...
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3answers
85k views

What does “8/7c” stand for?

I just saw an update on Facebook saying: Watch Russell present LIVE at the 42nd Annual NAACP Image Awards. Tonight at 8/7c on FOX. What does "8/7c" mean?
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3answers
153 views

'Eventually' — in the past or by some point in the future

Consider the following exchange: Alice: Did Charlotte send you that email? Bob: No, but I'm sure she'll send it eventually. In this case, there's no upper bound on the period of time in which ...
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2answers
87 views

Word for a “waypoint” but along a time dimension?

I want to be able to say 'After the process has begun, there are these time waypoints of 10 seconds, 30 seconds and 70 seconds from the start where I want this action to be performed.' I suppose I ...
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3answers
2k views

What time is 12.00pm? [duplicate]

There is a sign outside a shop near us which says 'Parking for loading vehicles only from 7 to 12pm'. Does that mean between 7pm and midnight, or between 7am and noon? For me 12.00 is neither ...
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2answers
9k views

When can I use “have a good day”?

I just want to ask if when would be the exact time to use have a good day? Because someone told me that the appropriate time would be in morning. Is that correct?
6
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3answers
15k views

Proper Timezone Acronym Usage - PT vs PDT or PST

What is the difference with using PT (Pacific Time) vs PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) or PST (Pacific Standard Time)? When you write the time, 2:00pm PT, would that be considered incorrect because it is ...
4
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6answers
10k views

“Since”, “until”, “from”, “to” on invoices or date ranges of a form

Which is the correct form on an invoice, or a general date range in a form, and why? Monkey dolls 12 GBP From 2012-01-03 to 2013-01-02 Monkey dolls 12 ...
4
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3answers
452 views

Payment to be due within three months “of” that meeting

Does the word "of" in the context of an established point in time refer to before or after that established point in time?
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4answers
32k views

Does the term “within 7 days” mean include the 7th day? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”? The title states it all: When an author says "within 7 days", does the author mean ...
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4answers
3k views

Precise meaning of “Last N days, weeks, months or years”

Would phrases like these generally be considered inclusive of the current period? I think it's pretty clear that last week does not include the current week. But does last 2 weeks include the current ...
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3answers
20k views

Is there a version of brunch for a meal between dinner and lunch?

Brunch has become quite a common word in the English language. Is there a similar word for a meal in place of dinner and lunch? (A phrase will also do).
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6answers
765 views

What is “long” doing in “all (time-period) long”?

What part of speech is long playing the part of in the bold parts of the quotations below? For one thing, it shows at a glance how much money is on hand for any particular purpose all month long. ...
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1answer
163 views

Is the expression “for all time” correct?

I'd like to know what's the correct usage of the expression "for all time". In particular in this sentence: "she cried for all time" (it's about a girl who took a plane and cried during the whole ...
14
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4answers
31k views

AM/PM vs a.m./p.m. vs am/pm

I used to think PM/AM was correct, but at some point, I switched to using p.m./a.m. for reasons I can't recall. I know that in practical, casual writing, people tend to use whatever form is most ...