Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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1answer
58 views

Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09 [duplicate]

What would be the most frequent/common way of telling the time when the minute is between 01 and 09? Is there any difference between BE and AmE? 5:03 -> 1) five oh three 2) five three 3) three ...
5
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3answers
8k views

“At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?

At the beginning of the century. In the beginning of the century. How to clearly distinguish when to use at, or in?
3
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1answer
135 views

Words that are their own past tense

Does anyone know of a particular "rule" to know which words are their own past tense (such as "hurt"), and aren't modified for time? I'd like an easy rule to tell my students
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1answer
58 views

Difference between elapsed time and aggregated time

In my timeline diagram, there are 3 items 1st item started at 12Noon and finished at 2PM (2 Hrs) 2nd item started at 3PM and finished at 6PM (3 Hrs) 3rd item started at 5PM and finished at 7PM (2 ...
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1answer
69 views

International Time Notation [closed]

I know some ways for time notation. 10 am 10:30 am 10.30 am 1030 am (superscript) I try to understand, is it correct to use superscript in time notation on international website?
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1answer
495 views

Why do we say 'year 1993' as “nineteen ninety three” instead of “one thousand nine hundred ninety three”?

Why do we read some calendar years by their two-digit place value and not according on their numerical place value like: 1500s as fifteen hundreds and not one thousand five hundreds 1895 as ...
0
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1answer
57 views

Is it right to say “Every ten hours”, “Once in ten hours”, or “Once in every ten hours”?

It’s a website where a listing is updated only once in a hundred hours. But when a user activates paid features, his listing can be updated ten times faster meaning once in ten hours. Which is the ...
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3answers
89 views

Need a word describing more frequently than monthly, other than semi monthly

We have business processes that happens periodically. These are labeled (in ascending frequency) as Quarterly, Monthly, Semi Monthly, Weekly, Semi Weekly, or Daily. We also have a process that can ...
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2answers
2k views

Are the phrases “in times like these” and “in times like this” both correct?

They both seem to be widely used. There is the variant "at a time like this", which is clearly correct, but I'm curious about the mismatched "times like this".
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1answer
181 views

“since 2009” is it inclusive or exclusive?

Assume the following situation: Person A meets person B in the winter of 2009. Then he/she meets the same person in 2010 and 2011. which sentence is true? Since winter 2009 person A has met person B ...
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7answers
4k views

Can “crepuscular” and/or “twilight” apply to morning half-light as well as in the evening

I know that's "sorta" two questions in one, but I'm stuck in an argument with a guy who says both words can apply to morning half-light. I disagree and think both only apply in the evening. I think ...
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3answers
125 views

If someone says “by 2015” does that mean before 2015? [duplicate]

Nissan aims to enlarge capacity to produce 450,000 vehicles by 2015" Does this mean that Nissan enlarged capacity by the onset of 2015 (i.e. jan 1 2015)? Or if it's July 15th 2015 can Nissan ...
0
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1answer
2k views

Do you say “thirty past six”?

When telling the time, are the following expressions legal or natural to native speakers: e.g.: 1. It's thirty past six (without adding "minutes"). 2. It's half an hour past six (adding "an hour"). ...
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4answers
6k views

What is a word that means “a span of six months”?

Is there a word that means "a span of six months"? That is, I want to connote a stretch of time that lasts half a year, not an event that happens every six months.
0
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1answer
100 views

“Following Tuesday” [duplicate]

If on a Saturday someone refers to the "following Tuesday", which Tuesday is being referenced? The closest Tuesday, or the one after? The first one, or the second one?: SAT SUN MON (TUE) WED THU FRI ...
0
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1answer
134 views

What is correct? 'At d/m/y hh:mm' or 'On d/m/y hh:mm'

What is correct, if I want to be specific? On 12/7/2015 12:35 I made a purchase At 12/7/2015 12:35 I made a purchase
2
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1answer
70 views

“what are the intentions of this girl” or “what the intentions of this girl are”

I am writing an essay. Can you help me with the order of words. "Even though it is not clear what are the intentions of this girl with respect to this boy, he is totally deluded and wants to buy ...
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3answers
24k views

Does “within an hour” mean before, after, or both?

Does within mean before or after? Or does it mean both? For example, Do not drink or eat within an hour of these pills.
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3answers
7k views

Can you say “within 90 days after”?

I understand that you can say, "within 30 days of receiving your application", but I am seeing more and more "within 30 days after your application is received". Is the latter grammatical?
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1answer
296 views
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2answers
141 views

What to call the time from “midnight to sunset”?

In many religious calendars, the day goes from sunset to sunset. When translating to the civil calendar, you can divide that day into two parts: from sunset to midnight (A), and from midnight to the ...
0
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0answers
232 views

“at 8pm”, “on Tuesday”, “tomorrow”

An event can happen at 8pm, it can happen on Tuesday, or it can happen tomorrow (no preposition). Is there a term for these kinds of phrases? Ie, going from 1 -> 1st, 2 -> 2nd, 3 -> 3rd, 4 -> 4th is ...
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1answer
51 views

Using ‘later’ when the amount of time is a complex phrase

In sentences like ‘The speed 10 seconds later is 3 m/s’ the amount of time is easy to specify. But what can I do if it is a complex phrase? In particular, I should like to express v(t + dt) in words, ...
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3answers
166 views

Word/phrase to indicate time occupation

If someone has a tight schedule or is a little strange, for the sake of politeness, I want to say him that I am not in a rush and you can take whatever time you need to answer me. Could you please ...
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4answers
154 views

“next two weeks” vs. “in 14 days from now”

Which one is most appropriate and why? I will have my laptop next two weeks. Or I will have my laptop in 14 days from now.
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6answers
17k views

Why is “our today's meeting” wrong?

One of the answers to this question states that "We shall discuss it in our today's meeting" is grammatically correct. To me, that sentence is clearly wrong. While in today's meeting is fine and in ...
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2answers
215 views

How and why did “AM”/"PM” come into play, as opposed to “a.m.”/“p.m.”?

From several sources, including english.stackexchange.com, one should write 3 p.m. instead of 3 PM. How did the all-capitals variant appear, and especially why? Is it because with typewriters and in ...
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1answer
111 views

“You've been living here [for] too long”

Is it correct to say "You've been living here for too long"? Or is it better to drop the for? "You've been living here too long." Is either preferrable over the other for some reason?
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3answers
164 views

What phrase can describe the final moments before a deadline?

I got a call from a friend while 10 minutes were left of my birthday. I want to put it like that The phone call from him ___________ was the icing on the cake. How to express that only 10 ...
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1answer
2k views

In the past 2 years [duplicate]

We are now at year 2013. What does it mean by saying in the past 2 years?Whats the period it refering to?
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9answers
28k views

Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise?

The period between sunrise and noon is called "morning", between noon and sunset is "afternoon". Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise? Edit/Clarification: Wikipedia defines ...
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1answer
142 views

The past perfect without a simple past time clause. “I had eaten the day before.”

While I was reading class material from a language school in Korea, I found a whole unit explaining use of the past perfect. However, none of the sentences used a time clause with the simple past to ...
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1answer
110 views

'Immediately' used not as an adverb, but as a conjunction

I'm sure that I've heard (not read) someone use the word immediately in a sentence in the same way that we would use "when" or "as soon as", and I would like to know if this is correct? Here's an ...
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1answer
145 views

Is there a word for “near in time” (both past & future) that doesn't also imply geographical proximity?

I'm currently writing a program that finds the "nearest sensible job", in terms of time. The only problem is that that phrase could also mean that the program is finding the nearest geographical job. ...
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11answers
15k views

Is there a generic word in English that means “through time”?

I know "temporal" means "to do with time", but I'm looking specifically for a term that means "spanning time" or "over time". Not necessarily all time, as "eternal" would mean, nor do I want to ...
12
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4answers
35k views

Proper Timezone Acronym Usage - PT vs PDT or PST

What is the difference with using PT (Pacific Time) vs PDT (Pacific Daylight Time) or PST (Pacific Standard Time)? When you write the time, 2:00pm PT, would that be considered incorrect because it is ...
4
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2answers
559 views

Words For Frequencies Less Than An Hour

I'm writing a scheduling program and need to show frequency options ranging from once a minute to once a year. Anything over an hour is pretty simple, but I'm looking a formal term for frequencies ...
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2answers
1k views

Does “every time” not mean “all the time”?

In this article, Singapore Plans To Become The World's First Smart Nation, there is an explanation about the E3A plan by Leonard: We're working on something that we've named E3A, which is our way ...
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6answers
761 views

What word could be used to describe a period of time that stays recent?

I have a button in an app that allows a user to enter a fixed period, i.e. they specify the start and end date and it always stays the same. I have another button that allows them to enter an ...
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6answers
80k views

How should “midnight on…” be interpreted?

From what I understand, the word "midnight" is usually interpreted incorrectly. Midnight is written as "12am" which would imply that it's in the morning. Therefore, it should be at the start of the ...
17
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3answers
17k views

Saying “today morning” to mean “this morning”

As an American, I use the term this morning, but I’ve noticed some Asian Indian coworkers who always say today morning to mean what I mean by this morning. Is this an Indian English “dialectism”? Is ...
2
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1answer
258 views

A term to explain my progress in an incomplete undergraduation

Here in Brazil, all the undergraduations last for 4-5 years and each year is divided by 2 academic periods and we refer to each one as period. Thus as I am a Mining Engineering undergraduate student ...
6
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3answers
2k views

Why are the notes or protocol of a meeting referred to as its 'minutes'?

A minute is 60 seconds. Something 'minute' is small, minor, perhaps short. Now, what about the minutes of a meeting or a session? As in, its written protocol? Are they called that because: The ...
0
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1answer
321 views

When do I use “hours” and “o'clock” in a programming document?

When do I have to use hours and o'clock in a programming document? For example, I have to show that the program runs at 23:45, should I use o'clock or hours? I used hours but my manager says that ...
3
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2answers
527 views

Is there anything wrong with asking what 12pm means? [closed]

I was preparing an application, where the specified deadline was today 12pm. My understanding of 12pm was 12 noon, but I found it a little odd for a deadline to be at 12 noon. So I sent the following ...
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4answers
45k views

“In the last 3 months” vs “in the past 3 months”

What's the difference between in the last 3 months and in the past 3 months if there is any?
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3answers
3k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even ...
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2answers
60k views

English notation for hour, minutes and seconds

I often see English notation about time using the " and ' symbols. I have always mistaken about the two, and even their meaning. I'm more used to "01:05:56", for example. Which is for the hour, ...
0
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1answer
169 views

Is it possible to “increase brevity”?

The title largely explains my concern. Does the formulation - "increase brevity" make sense? Is brevity a measurement that can be increased or decreased? The Oxford English dictionary mentions that ...
0
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3answers
313 views

‘On’ vs. ‘at’ with immutable date-time string [duplicate]

I understand that on is used for dates and at for times, as in On vs At with date and time. But what can I use when I have a string consists of both a date and a time? The issue is that I can’t change ...