Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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2
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1answer
673 views

Grammatical term for words like “yesterday”, “today”, “tomorrow”

We class words like "he", "she" and "they" as pronouns. Is there a category of words that "yesterday", "today" and "tomorrow" fall into?
4
votes
2answers
312 views

Words for describing an events start time

I am trying to classify events into two distinct groups. Event, in this context, means a public event which people might go to. This includes a broad collection of things including concerts, plays, ...
0
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3answers
519 views

Antonym/Opposite of “on the morrow”

If my birthday is on the 15th August and I tidy up on August 16th I can say: "I threw a huge party and tidied up on the morrow.". But if I prepared for the party on August 12th then what do I say? "I ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Time, hours, periods

Could anybody say me how to write periods of time in English. For example, I know how to say in case of years: from one year to another year. But how to deal with hours. Is it the same? from 5 am to 6 ...
0
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2answers
55 views

Do short time symbols need to be pluralised

We are wanting to know how to shorten time symbols/words in an open source code library. The code will emit: 1 second, 2 seconds, 1 hour, 2 hours, 1 week, 2 weeks, etc. Is the correct shorthand 1s, ...
0
votes
1answer
335 views

Why do we say 'last Monday morning' but not 'last morning'? [duplicate]

There was a very similar question asked about 'last night' and 'yesterday night' here but I didn't really think the question was answered that definitively. Also, I thought about how we use other ...
0
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0answers
7 views

“a time” vs “the time” [duplicate]

Reagan's "The Speech" made half a century ago was titled "A time for choosing". When is "a time" more appropriate than "the time" in the context of making a momentous choice?
0
votes
1answer
94 views

Time period in a date period [closed]

I want to mention the date and time I collected my questionnaires in an academic report. Let's say they are distributed: Time period: 1:00PM - 4:00PM Date period: 1 October 2014 - 3 October ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

What's the meaning of “over two-years' time”

For example, if someone says: Looking at the next three years, I think stock prices will drop, then does the phrase "two-years' time" mean at the end of the next three years, in the next three ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

“For three years” vs “in three years” [duplicate]

I haven't talked to my wife for three years. I haven't talked to my wife in three years. Are in and for interchangeable in these sentences?
1
vote
5answers
2k views

Word meaning “close in time, or presently happening”

Is there a word that can be used to describe something that is either close in time, or currently happening? Something like "proximate" or "imminent", but without the implication that the thing has ...
16
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5answers
2k views

Hypernym for “clock” and “watch”

Yesterday I said: "I can't read analog clocks", but my interlocutor corrected me saying that what I was pointing at was a watch and not a clock. Now, I am aware of the difference between the two, ...
0
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4answers
278 views

“During” a Period of Time

I'm working on a sentence (example below). It doesn't quite feel right: I tried to count the number of cars driven during 1980-1990. Specifically, the issue here is about usage of the ...
4
votes
7answers
8k views

Is “yesterday night” acceptable? [duplicate]

I catch a lot of grief about this from family and friends, so I figured I'd settle the score once and for all. In verbal context (though not written), I tend to use the phrase ... yesterday ...
21
votes
6answers
16k views

Why do we say “last night” and not “yesterday night”?

As from object, is there a rational reason for saying "last night" rather than "yesterday night", though you would say "yesterday morning" and "yesterday afternoon"?
6
votes
4answers
4k views

Is it correct to say “12:00am”?

I've read in various places the first minute of a day described as 12:00am. Now, whilst I personally prefer to use 24h clock notation and therefore don't have this problem as I can simply describe ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

How to phrase this statement with two time related adjectives? [closed]

I'm trying to say: "These are the current future plans for the project." I'm highlighting the current plans I have for the project that I'd like to do in the future. This doesn't seem to be correct ...
0
votes
1answer
308 views

Does the word “midnight” mean only 12 o'clock at night? [closed]

Does the word "midnight" mean only 12 o'clock at night? Is 1:30 AM midnight? Could you teach me?
3
votes
1answer
6k views

Is 'at the time of writing' correct?

I am writing a technical document and I need to refer to the current point of time. Should I say 'at the time of writing', 'at the time of this writing', or 'at the time of writing this'? Are all ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Is “happened Tuesday” (without “on”) a valid pattern? [duplicate]

The album was released Tuesday and has been well-received by […] Shouldn't it be "released on Tuesday"? Where did the "on" go? I think dropping the preposition is confusing, but I see it ...
1
vote
1answer
206 views

Does the term 'noon' have exact meaning? [closed]

Say I have a meeting at 10:00 and want to postpone it to around 13:00, can I ask the other to "postpone it to noon, around 13:00"? Or the term 'noon' means exactly 12:00?
2
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2answers
2k views
4
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2answers
9k views

“When” vs. “what time”

When are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? or What time are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? Please elaborate on the semantical differences.
3
votes
1answer
67 views

Which vs. What in regards to Continuous Numbers (like Temperature)?

As this question makes clear, "which" is used when there is a set number of choices available, while "what" is used when there is not a set number of choices available. Which term do we use, however, ...
1
vote
1answer
5k views

What's the Best English word for 6 months in this group: daily, weekly, quarterly, 6 months, yearly? [duplicate]

While writing programs, I need to create a drop down for setting periods, like daily, weekly, monthly, etc. Using one year as a time frame. This question is driven by lack of a better word. I've had ...
34
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2answers
3k views

Is there a term to describe an event which happens every 18 months?

Obviously every year is annual. Every two years is biennial. Does the English language have a term for every 18 months?
0
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1answer
183 views

Would “pentaminutely” reflect an event that occurs every five minutes?

Would the compound pentaminutely (from penta- and minutely) be correct in describing an event that occurs every five-minutes? Or is there a better word? Edit: For clarity, I'm looking to name an ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

“each day” → “daily”; “every other day” →?

Is there an adjective that means "every other day"? I found "bidaily" but it seems to mean "twice a day", not "every second day" (not even both as "biweekly" does). I'd need this word to very ...
1
vote
2answers
756 views

Every 30 minutes on the sharp

If the firework happens every 30 minutes from 7:00 7:30, 8:00, 8:30, ... 19:00 Can I say: There will be a fireworks display every half hour on the sharp.
0
votes
1answer
160 views

Frequency: Every three weeks or more / At least every three weeks / etc

I would like to express that an action should be done every three weeks, but that longer periods are also acceptable. Which of the following is the simplest, clearest, and most natural way to express ...
0
votes
3answers
118 views

Expression regarding a periodic task

So, if I have to do a certain task during a whole week but with a 3-week gap. For instance, in a 3-week period I will have to do that task for 1 week, in a 6-week period for 2 weeks, not in a row, of ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Asking about date [duplicate]

I'd like to know which way of asking questions is more common in the UK. Is there any difference? 1 What is the date today or What date is today? 2 What is the day today or What day is today? ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

On the part of speech of “now”

I recently had a conversation about the Spanish word "ahora", in which my conversant claimed that "ahora" is always an adverb, and never a noun. This lead me to investigate the part of speech of ...
11
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6answers
3k views

Can “crepuscular” and/or “twilight” apply to morning half-light as well as in the evening

I know that's "sorta" two questions in one, but I'm stuck in an argument with a guy who says both words can apply to morning half-light. I disagree and think both only apply in the evening. I think ...
14
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8answers
35k views

Precise names for parts of a day

I have learnt these words so far, please correct me if I'm wrong: Dawn, maybe 4am–6am? Morning, maybe 6am–9am? The food for the morning is called breakfast. People greet each other Good morning! ...
-2
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1answer
91 views

How to mention times before? [closed]

Which form is better for mentioning a time before : a month and ten days ago ten days and a month ago one month and ten days ago ten days and a month ago
8
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6answers
19k views

“Good night” or “good evening”?

If it's 7:30pm, which of these phrases is correct, Good night or Good evening?
20
votes
4answers
12k views

What phrase is “o'clock” contracting?

I have been intrigued by the word o'clock since I learned English. Although there is an equivalent to this word in my native language (Spanish en punto meaning on point or on the dot) I want to know ...
14
votes
3answers
57k views

What does the phrase “half seven” mean?

I've heard the British term "half seven" (or "half nine," "half five", etc) used to tell time. I can't remember though if it means 6:30 or 7:30 (i.e. half an hour before seven, or half past seven)? ...
14
votes
7answers
18k views

How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation?

A couple years ago, I switched all my personal clocks 24-hour notation. I live in the US, and 24-hour time is used very, very rarely. So, I haven't been able to listen to anyone say times aloud. ...
1
vote
3answers
5k views

How do they express the time, in American and British English?

I don't know if this is a good question. But as far as I know, and as I do it, American English also say "after" other than "past" in expressing times. For example, a quarter after six instead of, a ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

How to say one minute past midnight in military time?

I first would like to say that I did read How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? but my question isn't answered there. How do you say 0001 in military time? oh one hours? oh oh one ...
7
votes
5answers
58k views

“For the time being” vs. “for now”

Consider the following passages: A litter made of two rifles and two field jackets would suffice for now. That was good news; another bit was that the EPW was a lieutenant, a regimental REMF ...
52
votes
6answers
42k views

Which day does “next Tuesday” refer to?

At what point does next Tuesday mean the next Tuesday that will come to pass and no longer the Tuesday after the Tuesday that will come to pass? And, when does the meaning switch back? ...
0
votes
2answers
172 views

How to use decades in this sentence?

I want to say ongoing research on matter X using the word decades. The research started from the date of discovery of matter x in 1982 onwards. This should be an opening statement of an academic ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

what is correct for next monday - this monday coming or referring to monday week? [duplicate]

what is correct for next monday - this monday coming or referring to monday week? Then we have the problem saying monday after next......obviously referring to monday week
3
votes
1answer
352 views

“Four years are” vs. “four years is” [duplicate]

An exam question is driving me crazy. Find the mistake in the following: Four years are a long time to spend away from family and friends. Literally everyone solved it by replacing are with ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Verbs that follow an amount of time, singular or plural? [duplicate]

Which one is grammatically correct? One hour and a half is all you have left. One hour and a half are all you have left. Two hours is all you have left. Two hours are all you have left. ...
3
votes
5answers
448 views

“Your 1 hour 6 minutes are up” / “Your 1 hour 6 minutes is up”

I'm not sure which of these is more correct. Your 1 hour is up. This is easy. Singular. Your 5 minutes are up Again, simple enough. Plural. Your 1 hour and 6 minutes is up. Your 3 ...
0
votes
1answer
180 views

Is it Game time or game-time? [duplicate]

I'm trying to verify the correctness the following sentence: Game time is Sunday. Is it correct or should it be "Game-time"?