5
votes
1answer
901 views

When is Christmas Eve Eve?

I have recently seen weather forecasters making predictions for Christmas Eve Day, Christmas Eve Night, and for Christmas Day. One also reads of Christmas Eve Eve, with two eves. Are those all ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is “since so long” correct?

Because of our negligence towards the issue since so long, ... Am I using this correctly? I want to convey something like 1-2 months ago or since around September.
11
votes
6answers
2k views

Can “crepuscular” and/or “twilight” apply to morning half-light as well as in the evening

I know that's "sorta" two questions in one, but I'm stuck in an argument with a guy who says both words can apply to morning half-light. I disagree and think both only apply in the evening. I think ...
-5
votes
1answer
364 views

The correct way to say something is hired on an hourly basis

Which of the following is correct? We hire our bicycle... by the hour. by hours. by an hour. for hours.
0
votes
1answer
2k views

“At day five”, “on day five”, or something else?

When considering a set of days and writing about them in a 'diary mode', what preposition should I use in the following example: He died at day 5 of the treatment. He died on day 5 of the ...
4
votes
0answers
15k views

“On time” vs. “in time” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “In time ” versus “on time” I don't know if there is any difference. Which of the following should I use? I'll be on time to catch the ...
5
votes
3answers
14k views

“In the next two weeks” vs. “next two weeks”

Which one of the following is correct if the writer intends to say a week after next week? My friend and I decided to go to the beach in the next two weeks. My friend and I decided to go to ...
1
vote
3answers
361 views

“One way would be” vs “One way will be”?

What is the difference between "One way would be" and "One way will be"? Can both of them be used for future actions?
1
vote
5answers
4k views

How to say that you are going to do something really soon? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Do it very quickly” vs “do it ASAP” Quite often I need to say that I will do something really soon - e.g. in a few hours, but not sure how much ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even ...
5
votes
6answers
1k views

How to use “summers ago”

It is November 2011 now. If I want to refer to something that happened in August 2009, which phrase do I use? two summers ago three summers ago Or is there a better phrase that conveys ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

“When” vs. “what time”

When are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? or What time are we meeting, dear, I am hungry? Please elaborate on the semantical differences.
2
votes
4answers
394 views

Is “time” needed in this sentence?

I must remember to bath within ten minutes time. Is the word "time" needed in this sentence, or is it superficial? Is it even wrong to remove it?
4
votes
2answers
8k views

Which is correct here: “*sometime* next month” vs. “*sometimes* next month”?

Are those expressions equivalent, or which one should be preferred? For instance: I should finish this work sometimes next week versus I should finish this work sometime next week
11
votes
7answers
26k views

“In time” versus “on time”

Which one is correct: Submit your work in time. Submit your work on time.
4
votes
7answers
6k views

Is “yesterday night” acceptable?

I catch a lot of grief about this from family and friends, so I figured I'd settle the score once and for all. In verbal context (though not written), I tend to use the phrase ... yesterday ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

Has the use of the idiom “last week” surpassed the use of the correct “yester-week”?

In his book Write It Right, which was published in 1909 -– a hundred years ago -- Ambrose Bierce disagreed with the usage of the words “Last” and “Past” with “week”. He explained : Last and Past. ...
6
votes
3answers
18k views

“In the last 3 months” vs “in the past 3 months”

What's the difference between in the last 3 months and in the past 3 months if there is any?