0
votes
0answers
17 views

Is “happened Tuesday” (without “on”) a valid pattern? [duplicate]

The album was released Tuesday and has been well-received by […] Shouldn't it be "released on Tuesday"? Where did the "on" go? I think dropping the preposition is confusing, but I see it ...
-5
votes
1answer
239 views

Using prepositions with time

Which is the correct preposition? "at evening", "on evening", or "in the evening". Is this correct-"He mailed me (on evening / in the evening / at evening)"? How are prepositions used with time?
8
votes
6answers
751 views

What is “long” doing in “all (time-period) long”?

What part of speech is long playing the part of in the bold parts of the quotations below? For one thing, it shows at a glance how much money is on hand for any particular purpose all month long. ...
4
votes
6answers
8k views

“Since”, “until”, “from”, “to” on invoices or date ranges of a form

Which is the correct form on an invoice, or a general date range in a form, and why? Monkey dolls 12 GBP From 2012-01-03 to 2013-01-02 Monkey dolls 12 ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Can you say “within 90 days after”?

I understand that you can say, "within 30 days of receiving your application", but I am seeing more and more "within 30 days after your application is received". Is the latter grammatical?
6
votes
1answer
872 views

Question about the future “tense”

My daughter, who is in the 4th grade, was asked to answer questions about the following sentence: What time can you meet us at the school on Tuesday? She was asked questions about the usage of ...
13
votes
4answers
2k views

Why “half past” and not “half to”?

When telling time and 30 minutes has gone past an hour, we say “half past”. For instance, half past 4 or half past 5. Why can’t we also say “half to”. For instance, half to 5 or half to 6? Shouldn’t ...
1
vote
1answer
320 views

Correct use of “before” & “from”?

I came across this sentence in a newspaper: Five minutes from the end I didn't think we could win this game.We deserved to win this championship. I am confused as to why he uses from the end. ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

“At day five”, “on day five”, or something else?

When considering a set of days and writing about them in a 'diary mode', what preposition should I use in the following example: He died at day 5 of the treatment. He died on day 5 of the ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

“Please finish this by May 15” — can I still do it today? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? Today is May 15. I have an email in my inbox that says Please respond by May 15. My question is: what ...
4
votes
0answers
15k views

“On time” vs. “in time” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “In time ” versus “on time” I don't know if there is any difference. Which of the following should I use? I'll be on time to catch the ...
2
votes
0answers
90 views

Is “do something by date X” inclusive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? For example, if John says: Return it to me by March 24th. Does it mean that I need to return it to ...
4
votes
4answers
30k views

Does the term “within 7 days” mean include the 7th day? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”? The title states it all: When an author says "within 7 days", does the author mean ...
2
votes
1answer
316 views

When can I omit “for” before a time duration?

Do not watch television [for] more than one hour a day. Is omitting the “for” okay or is that grammatically incorrect?
5
votes
3answers
14k views

“In the next two weeks” vs. “next two weeks”

Which one of the following is correct if the writer intends to say a week after next week? My friend and I decided to go to the beach in the next two weeks. My friend and I decided to go to ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “in [some period]” different from “within [some period]”?

Q1: "I'll finish this job within 5 days" definitely means the job is expected to cost 5 days or less. However, does "I'll finish this job in 5 days" mean exactly the same? Q2: Can we say, "I'll ...
-1
votes
3answers
6k views

Is the “will let you know afternoon” correct? [closed]

Which of the following are correct? Will let you know in the afternoon. Will let you know afternoon. Will let you know after noon.
-1
votes
1answer
445 views

Is preposition required before 'yesterday' in certain cases? [closed]

Is the following sentence correct? Last saved by Rod yesterday at 6:15 PM
6
votes
1answer
1k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...
11
votes
7answers
28k views

“In time” versus “on time”

Which one is correct: Submit your work in time. Submit your work on time.
5
votes
4answers
2k views

“At the end” or “in the end”

Which is correct? I am planning to buy some property at the end of 2011. I am planning to buy some property in the end of 2011.
12
votes
5answers
22k views

What does 'ten of six' mean in regard to time?

I am referring of course to the expression describing time. Today a corporate trainer (From north Philadelphia) that is teaching a class at my company used it in the context that the current time was ...
4
votes
3answers
11k views

Does “within an hour” mean before, after, or both?

Does within mean before or after? Or does it mean both? For example, Do not drink or eat within an hour of these pills.
5
votes
3answers
5k views

“At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?

At the beginning of the century. In the beginning of the century. How to clearly distinguish when to use at, or in?