5
votes
3answers
97 views

On the part of speech of “now”

I recently had a conversation about the Spanish word "ahora", in which my conversant claimed that "ahora" is always an adverb, and never a noun. This lead me to investigate the part of speech of ...
14
votes
19answers
6k views

Single word for a very small amount of time [closed]

In French, if I want to quantify a very small amount of time (but not fixed: it can be 5 ms or 0.1 ms) I can use a pouième. Is there an equivalent in English? I'm not looking for an expression but ...
3
votes
6answers
180 views

How can I refer to a period of day when people are awake/active?

The context is comparing air travel vs overnight train travel. In this case, air travel takes 1 hour, plus time required to travel from city to airport, arrive early for check-in & security, then ...
2
votes
2answers
957 views

Is “12:30”, (the time of day), an abstract noun?

Nothing else to add, I just want to make sure.
0
votes
1answer
357 views

What is this time describing noun called? [duplicate]

A noun for when something happened is occasion. A noun for how long something took is duration. But how would you describe an event that happened at a certain time after an occasion? Example: The ...
0
votes
4answers
5k views

What do you call “one hundredth of a second”?

As in: He broke the world record of 14.05 I tried searching Wikipedia and ended up with centisecond. It sounds so scientific. What is it called in colloquial English?
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there such a thing as a “pre-anniversary”? Or a better word?

I suddenly find myself trying to describe a date that's an exact number of years before a scheduled event and I can't think of a better word to describe it than "pre-anniversary" or maybe even ...
2
votes
4answers
391 views

Is “time” needed in this sentence?

I must remember to bath within ten minutes time. Is the word "time" needed in this sentence, or is it superficial? Is it even wrong to remove it?
17
votes
4answers
1k views

Word for “distance in time”

I need the correct English word for the German expression (zeitlicher) Abstand. Abstand means "distance", and zeitlich means "in time". The "distance" between building maintenance dates is about ...
9
votes
8answers
1k views

How to name a 15-minute period?

In Dutch, we have the word "kwartier" to denote a 15-minute period. It is derived from the word "kwart", which means quarter. It is very common to use this word in both spoken and written language. ...
4
votes
2answers
226 views

When do we need to add 's' to a numeric year?

I have found some statements using the format years instead of year. When do we use years like 1950s and 2010s, rather than year like 1950 and 2010? Fish stocks here began to decline in the 1950s, ...