1
vote
3answers
136 views

'Eventually' — in the past or by some point in the future

Consider the following exchange: Alice: Did Charlotte send you that email? Bob: No, but I'm sure she'll send it eventually. In this case, there's no upper bound on the period of time in which ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

“Thence” to allude to the past

I see that "hence" means roughly "from this fact/time/place/source", while "thence" means roughly "from that fact/time/place/source". Usage such as "half an hour hence" is typically (although perhaps ...
4
votes
3answers
327 views

Payment to be due within three months “of” that meeting

Does the word "of" in the context of an established point in time refer to before or after that established point in time?
8
votes
6answers
697 views

What is “long” doing in “all (time-period) long”?

What part of speech is long playing the part of in the bold parts of the quotations below? For one thing, it shows at a glance how much money is on hand for any particular purpose all month long. ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

“In 15 minutes” or “15 minutes later”?

Several years ago, when I was watching a show, it was 15:45 and the show started at 16:00. A foreigner asked me: "When will this show start?" My English is not good, and I never talked to foreigners. ...