Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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22 views

Lack of time *and* Time is precious [on hold]

I'm certain that there exist a unique phrase that means both "Lack of time" and "Time is precious". When I try to remember what the phrase is, I'm constantly having the association of a precious ...
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23 views

Saying time out loud

I have read 24 hour time. How to say it? and How should one say times aloud in 24-hour notation? but they only cover part of my question. I'm wondering if there is a comprehensive set of rules that ...
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29 views

Are the following sentences correct ?If the eating starts at 7:00 AM and finishes at 7:30 AM, and the time is now 7:20 AM [closed]

If the eating starts at 7:00 AM and finishes at 7:30 AM, and the time is now 7:20 AM. Are the following sentences correct ? I eat at 7:00 AM. I am eating now. I have eaten. I have eaten for 20 ...
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1answer
76 views

Common ways to tell the time

I'm a non-native speaker. In school, I was taught that the proper way of telling times in English is X o' clock. In NAE, would it be common to omit o' clock and just say something like: It's ...
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2answers
46 views

Is there a word for “less-than-yearly”?

is there a single word to describe an indeterminate less-than-yearly frequency? Consider the following > A plan costs $100 annually. The user can choose to pay semi-annually, amounting to 2 ...
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3answers
52 views

Would that be correct ? I finished eating at 7:30 AM. = I have eaten at 7:30 AM [closed]

Would that be correct ? I finished eating at 7:30 AM. = I have eaten at 7:30 AM.
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1answer
17 views

Time in conditional clause

I've gone through a lot of rules on conditional sentences in English and couldn't find the answer. What time should I use in the following comment to a source code? # Rebuild databases if ...
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23 views

Question on correct way to list time in a list

If I am using time in a list, do I need to write it out? Is this correct? We will leave at either 12:15, 1, 2:30, or 3:15.
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1answer
49 views

“time” for instants or durations in science

I am trying to describe the evolution of a motion which is composed of smooth parts called "free flights" and instantaneous impacts. For example, consider a bouncing ball: its motion is a succession ...
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1answer
26 views

'Just now': past, future or both?

I only use it speaking of something that has just been done, i.e. in the very near past. I've finished washing the dishes just now. Can it be used also speaking of something that is about to be ...
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1answer
42 views

When exactly does “overnight on” certain day happen?

When somebody says for example "That will happen overnight on Wednesday", do they mean it will happen on the night between Tuesday and Wednesday, or between Wednesday and Thursday?
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7answers
173 views

Idiom or phrase for “nickel-and-dime”ing your time?

I'm looking for a phrase for someone who is over-grasping with regards to minutes on their work time-sheet or other time accounting. Someone who will not only charge from the moment they walk in the ...
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1answer
43 views

How to input during an amount of time?

How do I correctly write someone has been doing this for this certain amount of time? For example: Next 30 years he wrote multiple books. or should I write it: He wrote multiple books in 30 ...
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1answer
40 views

How do I address a period of time in non-time units?

I need to say that something has been happening for several bus stops. What is the most natural way to do it?
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1answer
55 views

What is the difference: in 10 minutes' time, in 10 minutes, after 10 minutes [duplicate]

For example, current time is 10:10. then when will the train leave? The train will leave in 10 minutes. The train will leave in 10 minutes' time. The train will leave after 10 minutes. If the ...
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1answer
47 views

Midnight semantics

I received an email with a discount code valid 'until Saturday midnight' but when I went to use it on Saturday lunchtime it had expired already, at 00:00 Saturday morning. My understanding was that ...
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2answers
20 views

About time presentation. The latest News should be restricted before 24 hours ago from current time?

I have a web service to provide News. But by the contract, I can only show the latest News before 24 hours ago. That is, if today is 2015-11-24, the news I provided should be before 2015-11-23 Can I ...
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1answer
63 views

During + a time period (including a dash between two dates) [closed]

During 2000-2010 If I say it in English, should I say "during 2000 and 2010" or something else?
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1answer
55 views

Over vs during - difference in whether it lasts up to the present? [closed]

I have read the following: we use over when something last up to the present /or future/ and we use during for a definite period of time. So is this wrong? I worked in the company IBM over the ...
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1answer
27 views

How do you refer to something you will go back in time and do? [closed]

This is quite confusing for me, do you refer to it in future tense, past tense or would there need to be a new tense?
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3answers
48 views

How can I describe the status which indicates that it's not the time to start the scheduled task

Suppose there is a task scheduled to be started at 15:00, and now it's 14:50. How can I describe this status which indicates that it's not the time to start the scheduled task, and still need to await ...
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1answer
54 views

Use of the present continuous to refer to timetabled events

One of the things that is constantly confusing for English language learners, but comes with ease to native speakers, is when to use present continuous and when to use present simple. Because of ...
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1answer
47 views

Deadlines as instants or periods with various verbs and tenses

I was wondering whether a deadline is more of an instant or more of a period. It seems to have some of both aspects, but with more of an emphasis on the instant. I thought that this should be ...
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3answers
391 views

Phrases that mean “a really long time”? [closed]

I was telling my kids that sometimes there are many ways to say the same thing, especially with idiomatic phrases. I don't know why, but the simple phrase "a really long time" came to mind, and I ...
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2answers
55 views

At the time vs Of the time

Can anyone explain the difference between "at the time" vs "of the time"? For example: This did not quite fit the prevailing architectural schools at the time it was designed. This did not quite ...
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2answers
70 views

Is “kudos” given someone for past events only — or does near-future work, too?

Is kudos to be used to wish somebody for only an event that happened to them in the past, or can you also use kudos for an event which is going to happen in the near future?
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2answers
66 views

Then or Than? Which one is correct? [closed]

which is the correct one? If not, then that e-mail wasn't personally from me. or: If not, than that e-mail wasn't personally from me.
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52 views

Is the expanded form of “UTC” ever spelled with an diæresis?

I've always seen "UTC" expanded as Coordinated Universal Time. In addition, both the Wikipedia and Encyclopædia Britannica entries, as well as pretty much every reference to it I've ever seen that I ...
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1answer
56 views

A Question on Commas

I've noticed that in all sentences I come across which start with an indication of time, there is always a comma after before the sentence is continued. For example: When I was five, I bought my first ...
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1answer
184 views

How to suggest an alternate time/date?

How to suggest a different time? E.g. Manager asked (in email): "Hi, Can we go through these at 10AM tomorrow?" Can I answer: "Can we move it an hour to 11AM?"
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2answers
104 views

Can “yesterdays” (plural) be used to denote a range of past days?

So I just learned that "yesterdays" is a word (without the apostrophe). It is the plural of "yesterday". The trouble is, what does plural of "yesterday" really mean? I could not find any example ...
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1answer
143 views

What's the word for day/night?

So I'm customizing a WordPress (cms) for hotel for a client and he asked me to do add a new functionality that is a options dropdown where the user can select "time" like Time: - Day - ...
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1answer
58 views

Telling the time - Minute 01 to 09 [duplicate]

What would be the most frequent/common way of telling the time when the minute is between 01 and 09? Is there any difference between BE and AmE? 5:03 -> 1) five oh three 2) five three 3) three ...
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1answer
58 views

Usage of am/pm with the past/to format

Which of the following sentences is more common? Are they both acceptable? It's twenty-five past seven am. It's seven twenty-five am. I wonder if the usage of am/pm is okay when using the past/to ...
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1answer
135 views

Words that are their own past tense

Does anyone know of a particular "rule" to know which words are their own past tense (such as "hurt"), and aren't modified for time? I'd like an easy rule to tell my students
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1answer
69 views

International Time Notation [closed]

I know some ways for time notation. 10 am 10:30 am 10.30 am 1030 am (superscript) I try to understand, is it correct to use superscript in time notation on international website?
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1answer
479 views

Why do we say 'year 1993' as “nineteen ninety three” instead of “one thousand nine hundred ninety three”?

Why do we read some calendar years by their two-digit place value and not according on their numerical place value like: 1500s as fifteen hundreds and not one thousand five hundreds 1895 as ...
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3answers
88 views

Need a word describing more frequently than monthly, other than semi monthly

We have business processes that happens periodically. These are labeled (in ascending frequency) as Quarterly, Monthly, Semi Monthly, Weekly, Semi Weekly, or Daily. We also have a process that can ...
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2answers
2k views

Are the phrases “in times like these” and “in times like this” both correct?

They both seem to be widely used. There is the variant "at a time like this", which is clearly correct, but I'm curious about the mismatched "times like this".
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175 views

“since 2009” is it inclusive or exclusive?

Assume the following situation: Person A meets person B in the winter of 2009. Then he/she meets the same person in 2010 and 2011. which sentence is true? Since winter 2009 person A has met person B ...
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56 views

Is it right to say “Every ten hours”, “Once in ten hours”, or “Once in every ten hours”?

It’s a website where a listing is updated only once in a hundred hours. But when a user activates paid features, his listing can be updated ten times faster meaning once in ten hours. Which is the ...
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3answers
123 views

If someone says “by 2015” does that mean before 2015? [duplicate]

Nissan aims to enlarge capacity to produce 450,000 vehicles by 2015" Does this mean that Nissan enlarged capacity by the onset of 2015 (i.e. jan 1 2015)? Or if it's July 15th 2015 can Nissan ...
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3answers
4k views

Up to now vs until now

I want to say that something is currently completed, in a percentage. Which sentence is correct? Up to now the job has been completed by 10% or Until now the job has been completed by 10% ...
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1answer
96 views

“Following Tuesday” [duplicate]

If on a Saturday someone refers to the "following Tuesday", which Tuesday is being referenced? The closest Tuesday, or the one after? The first one, or the second one?: SAT SUN MON (TUE) WED THU FRI ...
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1answer
132 views

What is correct? 'At d/m/y hh:mm' or 'On d/m/y hh:mm'

What is correct, if I want to be specific? On 12/7/2015 12:35 I made a purchase At 12/7/2015 12:35 I made a purchase
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1answer
70 views

“what are the intentions of this girl” or “what the intentions of this girl are”

I am writing an essay. Can you help me with the order of words. "Even though it is not clear what are the intentions of this girl with respect to this boy, he is totally deluded and wants to buy ...
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1answer
56 views

Difference between elapsed time and aggregated time

In my timeline diagram, there are 3 items 1st item started at 12Noon and finished at 2PM (2 Hrs) 2nd item started at 3PM and finished at 6PM (3 Hrs) 3rd item started at 5PM and finished at 7PM (2 ...
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278 views

“See you Monday at 10AM” vs “See you on Monday at 10AM”

Is it correct to say/write "See you Monday at 10AM"?
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51 views

Using ‘later’ when the amount of time is a complex phrase

In sentences like ‘The speed 10 seconds later is 3 m/s’ the amount of time is easy to specify. But what can I do if it is a complex phrase? In particular, I should like to express v(t + dt) in words, ...
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225 views

“at 8pm”, “on Tuesday”, “tomorrow”

An event can happen at 8pm, it can happen on Tuesday, or it can happen tomorrow (no preposition). Is there a term for these kinds of phrases? Ie, going from 1 -> 1st, 2 -> 2nd, 3 -> 3rd, 4 -> 4th is ...