Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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13
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7answers
3k views

Is there a common word for floor and ceiling?

Walls divide rooms but what do you call what divides stories? Looking from below it would be the ceiling, looking from above it would be the floor. But when looking at it from the outside? Is there a ...
1
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2answers
44 views

A term for non-player targetted information

I'm looking for a term that would describe the information that is not supposed to be known by players, not essential for their gaming experience. Like a game object (or feature) that isn't actually ...
2
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4answers
421 views

Terminology for items made by recycling craft

Recycling craft is the art of making usable items from recyclable stuff. What would be a suitable term for the items produced by this craft?
-1
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0answers
39 views

Term for a group of people born in a specific cohort

Does there exist such a term? I like to name a group of people who's born for example in 1976 or 1991. So I thought probably "76ers" or "91-ers" would do fine but is that correct English? I mean ...
2
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4answers
116 views

Alternative to phrase “Plantation shutters”?

I live and work in Atlanta, in the South. I write descriptions of property for real estate agents. A desirable and popular window treatment here are what is widely referred to as Plantation Shutters. ...
2
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3answers
414 views

Negative versions of extreme adjectives

If something positive is "too much", it becomes negative. For example, too much security could be perceived as being trapped. Is there a term for this relation? In other words, if a word with a ...
7
votes
3answers
532 views

Is there a term for a product having the same name as its place of origin?

Several trade products, especially food, have been named after their places of origin throughout the centuries. To mention just a few, champagne, after Champagne, France. calico, after Calicut, ...
8
votes
4answers
138 views

A term for someone denying an accusation but appearing guilty as a result

The situation being when you are accused of something, and provide a logical reason why you wouldn't (not couldn't) do such a thing, and such an explanation only makes you sound more guilty. For ...
0
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2answers
57 views

What is a word for mystery stories where the reader has no idea about what happened? [on hold]

I am searching for ESL high level English mystery but instead found really obvious stories where the crime is just stated LAMB TO THE SLAUGHTER by ROALD DAHL ...
0
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3answers
60 views

Correct terminology for items carried on a fictional starship? [on hold]

I'm working on a sci-fi video game project that involves starships and simulation of life on board. I'm wondering what the correct term would be for an abstracted overview for the player of what is on ...
1
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3answers
63 views

Why 'blood vessels' and not 'blood tubes'?

I have a silly question. The way I imagine arteries and veins are as tubes that arise from one part and carry blood to the other part. Why do we call them 'vessels' (which reminds us of cooking ...
0
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0answers
53 views

What does a quantum mechanics magician do?

Thousands of years ago a coppersmith was a magician doing stuff most couldn't fathom, a few decades ago a computer programmer was a magician doing stuff most couldn't fathom. If a quantum mechanical ...
0
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0answers
13 views

“Initiate a transition” vs “anticipate the subsequent digression”

What is the different between writing a sentence that serves to initiate a transition and one that does to anticipate the subsequent digression. Can somebody please give me a example?
1
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3answers
119 views

What is the name of the word or phrase people insert into sentences, seemingly unintentionally?

For instance, I have a friend who just can't help himself constantly saying "ok". He'll say things like "ok, now we're going to [...]" or "now we've seen that, ok", and I'm just wondering what this ...
2
votes
1answer
899 views

generic reference, specific reference, and “particular reference”?

Webs are beautiful. (I'm sure it is a generic reference.) The web is beautiful. (I'm sure it is a specific reference.) The Web is beautiful. (This web refers to the World Wide Web, a specific web in ...
0
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2answers
44 views

Is “versionizing” the right word when it comes to design? [closed]

What is the process called when one makes design versions of a product? E.g. When one is making new subpage versions based on defined website design. Or when making a version of apple juice packaging ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

Like “sexist” or “racist,” but in reference to being gay?

Is there a term that is similar to sexist or racist but refers to gay people? "Homophobic" comes to mind, but that's more a fear or disgust of homosexuals versus discrimination based solely on sexual ...
11
votes
9answers
3k views

What's an item called that was required to progress in a video game, but now isn't?

This question was inspired by an Arqade question: How do I save a Destiny warp drive?. The premise is this: In order to progress to mission 3 (or 4 etc.) you must complete the second mission. The ...
9
votes
3answers
331 views

Rhetorical evasion

While it may not be a rhetorical fallacy as such, I'm wondering if there is term that covers this: When losing an argument, divert the conversation to something unrelated, and say something ...
0
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2answers
64 views

Cancer be beaten

Is there a name for this construction or wordplay? It can be both: Cancer be beaten Cancer can be beaten ("Can" in "Cancer" is emphasized for the purpose) It can be called a wordplay or a pun ...
2
votes
3answers
138 views

Besides “flood plain”, is there also something similar called “flood plane”?

Having stumbled upon the term flood plane (meaning the area along a river that is flooded occasionally), I searched for it and the correct spelling seems to be flood plain. Now, some uncertainty ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

Supine - what is supine in English grammar?

Prompted by the use of a poster who obviously uses supine as a variant for to-infinitive I was really a bit annoyed about such confusion of terms, as supine is a term in Latin grammar for a rare verb ...
2
votes
2answers
94 views

A term for the extreme strength and skill of “stationary muscle control”

Is there a single term (preferred) or two-word phrase (acceptable), possibly technical, though not necessarily so, that conveys the idea of a person having extreme strength and skill at stationary ...
11
votes
2answers
749 views

“pros and cons”, “black and white”, “ups and downs”. Always in a fixed sequence, is there a word or phrase for these?

Is there a word or phrase for two nouns or adjectives joined by a conjunction (usually "and") in a fixed sequence? alive and well fast and furious hat and gloves pen and pencil ...
6
votes
1answer
247 views

Is there a term when the final spelling of a word is changed for rhyming purposes?

We see and hear it all the time in commercials, advertisements, poetry, jokes, etc. One classic example is this light and very interesting poem by Ogden Nash, where we can find two instances of this ...
1
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1answer
81 views

Is there a correct techincal term used to describe a phrase or name consisting of a pair or group of homonyms; i.e., “Spring Spring?”

Is there a term to describe names or phrases consisting of two or more homonyms, such as "Spring Spring" or "Rock Rock?"
0
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1answer
17 views

Formatting of defined terms

In my report, I am defining/describing some terms. What is a proper way to start and format a sentences like: The term crawling denotes the practice of ... Should I put the word/term crawling in ...
10
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6answers
1k views

“Bear market” / “Bull market” : what relationship those animals have with economy?

A bull market is a upward trend and a bear market a downward trend, but how did those animals end up in financial terminology?
0
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1answer
47 views

What is a postpositional enclitic? [closed]

What is a post positional enclitic? I don't know anything about it, but I think it is a part of english grammar.
4
votes
5answers
739 views

Is there a specific name for this kind of water dispenser?

I see these water jars in many food service areas (hotels, company cafeteria, etc). I'm wondering if there is a specific name for them. "Water dispenser" seems too unspecific. I wonder if they ...
1
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1answer
42 views

Which word can I use to refer to pictures on the backside of the book covers?

Which word or words can I use to refer to picture on the opposite side of the book cover? I.e. in hardcover bock each double page/broadside behind the hardcover can have a picture on it. Is there a ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

endophyte studies OR the studies of endophytes?

Which is better to describe research into microorganism, especially fungi: endophyte studies or the study of endophytes?
0
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0answers
38 views

“at 8pm”, “on Tuesday”, “tomorrow”

An event can happen at 8pm, it can happen on Tuesday, or it can happen tomorrow (no preposition). Is there a term for these kinds of phrases? Ie, going from 1 -> 1st, 2 -> 2nd, 3 -> 3rd, 4 -> 4th is ...
3
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1answer
61 views

What is the term for comparatives that cannot be formed with -er and -est?

Is there a term to describe the case where using "-er" and "-est" is incorrect to form a comparative because it is formed by using "more" or "most"? For example: more difficult instead of ...
6
votes
2answers
428 views

Line Art: A word like Scrimshaw or Filligree?

I'm looking for a word that refers to a fine, decorative line-work illustration that is used for accenting signage or letterhead. It's similar in usage to scrimshaw (except not a picture) or filigree ...
1
vote
0answers
99 views

Meaning of the term “empty use” in the context of modal verbs

I'm reading a book titled Comprehensive High School English Grammar & Composition. The author, who is Indian, says this on the use of the modal verbs can and could: Can is used to express ...
0
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1answer
51 views

Term for composing/melodizing a fictional song

Is there a special term for composing/melodizing a fictional song? Some novels have songs with made-up lyrics written by the authors; and sometimes, music is composed for those songs in real life. ...
2
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1answer
3k views

Why are the Warriors called the dubs or Golden State is referred to as dub city?

Urban dictionary doesn't tell me anything about why the Warriors are called the Dubs or why Golden State is called Dub City.
0
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1answer
93 views

Term for Subversive, Passive-Aggressive Insults (In which the insulter has plausible deniability, concerning any actual effort at offense)

To clarify, what I'm seeking is a term that represents a speaker offering a backhanded compliment, in which the speaker is the only one that doesn't share this point of view. Example: "Personally, I ...
1
vote
2answers
125 views

Specific word used for the combining of past and current experience

I am looking for the specific word used for the combining of past experience with new. It is one word and I don't think it was Latin based but I just don't remember...
1
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3answers
93 views

Medical terminology and using certain word parts

I'm taking a medical terminology class right now and I'm having issues discerning which word roots I'm supposed to use when they have the same meaning. For example, the combining forms pneum/o and ...
0
votes
2answers
36 views

What is this type of construction/phrase called? if at all there is a word for it!

The general idea is One set is part of a group, but the whole group is not a set This might be kind of vague but I don't have a better example right now on this other than... All ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

Expression for “a place where you could settle and live without having to ask for permission, pay taxes, …” [closed]

On the History Stack Exchange they were talking about “white spots”. Is there a proper expression, a single word, or a phrase for such a place? By "white spot" I mean a place where you (if you ...
9
votes
9answers
21k views

What does “I know, right?” mean?

Not only is my seventh grader using this phrase, but her teachers are as well. I suppose it means I totally agree with you and you totally agree with me but it sounds like there is a subtle Is that ...
2
votes
5answers
111 views

What to call a doctor who doesn't really cure their patient with their effort (to get more money from “repeat business”)?

Doctors Are Not “Only Out to Make Money” I read that article and can't get a good word for that kind of doctors, except the term doctors (who) are only out to make money in the second line of the ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Is there a term for “from X to Y” that includes everything?

Is there a term for "from X to Y" that includes everything? Like every animal, "from snail to elephant." Or "through thick and thin." Added later: Sorry, I think I was misunderstood - I meant to ask ...
6
votes
2answers
85 views

Is there a name for this type of sentence: “The higher the temperature, the higher the pressure”? [duplicate]

Is there a name for this type of sentence: "The higher the temperature, the higher the pressure"? Such a word grouping is generally accepted as a sentence in science.
32
votes
19answers
4k views

What do you call a response which does not address the question?

When some one is asked a question, sometimes if they are trying to avoid answering the question, they respond with something unrelated. What is the word for that response? Eg. A: Why were you late? ...
1
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2answers
422 views

Inverted conditional sentence using 'can' and 'will'

On this page in Wikipedia!, it states for first conditional sentences: The condition can also be expressed using the modal verb should. This form can be used to make an inverted condition ...
4
votes
2answers
98 views

Is there a word to describe feathers, scales, fur, hair, etc. on an animal

Is there a word to describe or reference feathers, scales, fur, hair, exoskeleton (maybe?), etc. on a creature?