Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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Is there a grammatical term for 'extra information' in a sentence?

Sorry if this is a basic question, but is there a grammatical term for the 'extra information' in the sentences below? He was giving a presentation to the finance department She was having lunch at ...
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2answers
88 views

What we call the next consecutive question in series of problem

on stack overflow we can edit the questions and this problem is based on that. Scenario I was asking problem A and got the solution of A but face a new problem B. How do I mention (reference ...
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5answers
1k views

In the context of cooking, what is the difference between “flipper” and “spatula”?

I'm genuinely confused about this because at first I thought a spatula was a cooking tool resembling a flat pallet attached at an angle to the handle that could be used for activities such as flipping ...
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0answers
49 views

What is different between “Arithmetic Calculation” and “Calculation” in computer science? [migrated]

What is different when you say "Arithmetic Calculation" and "Calculation" in the context of the computer science? The "arithmetic" in the former seems needless to me since all calculations are ...
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1answer
36 views

What sentence does not belong? [on hold]

I am trying to figure out the sentence that does not belong to this paragraph. The researchers developed three criteria for the test subjects. The test subjects needed to be women because the drug ...
64
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5answers
6k views

What does 'TL;DR' mean and how is it used?

I do my best, at my advanced age, to come to grips with the apparent acceptability of such widely used words/expressions/abbreviations as lol/LOL, IMHO, AFAIK, etc. However, TLDR/tl;dr defeats me. ...
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2answers
835 views

Is there a word like “ambidextrous” to describe mixed hemisphere brain dominance?

In brain dominance theory, the terms left-/right-brained, left-/right-minded, and left/right hemisphere dominant are often used to describe a particular lateral dominance within the human brain. Many ...
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18answers
6k views

What is a word that means unforgettable but with a negative connotation?

When I look up unforgettable in a thesaurus, I get words like enduring, remarkable, or exceptional. These all are positive; I just cannot forget such a wondrous thing! I, however, want a word that ...
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3answers
38 views

Is there a term in English (or any other language) to refer to the movement of a large, rapidly spreading fire?

I like very specific words and this would help me with a poem I'm writing. Also, if you have any references for very specific words/know any yourself (English or otherwise), they would be appreciated. ...
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2answers
36 views

A word for 'independent episodes'

When we have a series of episodes where every single episode depends on and develops from the previous, we may call that a sequel, or maybe a continuum. Now let us say that we have a collection of ...
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2answers
144 views

Is there a word that describes this gesture of interlocking hands on the lower stomach?

Specifically, I am referring to the traditional gesture some female service staff members seem to do, when demonstrating their work or their readiness to receive orders. Also, this is the gesture ...
2
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2answers
42 views

“old stiff” (army slang, 1940s, Br)

I am reading the diary of a Colonel in the British Army in the 1940s. He describes some of the recruits as "old stiffs". This seems to be largely a compliment, and seems to refer to older folk who ...
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3answers
47 views

Word for “entity who/that decides whether to grant or deny a request”?

Checker comes to mind but I want something better. The context I have in mind is in software development. What would you call the mechanism that will allow or deny user actions (based on users' ...
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4answers
4k views

What do you call someone who uses Twitter? [closed]

Are they a twitterer Twitterer Twitter user tweeter tweep? Is it just a matter of preference? For comparison, I think "Facebook user" is the accepted term.
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1answer
2k views

Is there a term for a foreign word that looks like an English word but has a completely different meaning?

Examples: gift (German) = poison poisson (French) = fish embarazada (Spanish) = pregnant triviale (Italian) = vulgar
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2answers
58 views

What type of phrase is “I'm telling you,” when used for emphasis

Consider the following sentence: I'm telling you, I left it right there. In this sentence, the phrase "I'm telling you" is used to emphasise the truth of the clause that follows. What is the ...
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6answers
366 views

What is the proper English term for polycopié (de cours)?

In French, several universities use polycopiés instead of course books for teaching. The term polycopié can be translated as handout. Is it correct to use it in this case, in which a polycopié ...
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5answers
3k views

Term for same root word but words with different meaning

Some words have the same etymology, root, but mean different things, such as mysterious and mystical. What are some other pairs (or more) that fall into this category, and what exactly is this ...
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1answer
34 views

Can we say Copy-Right-Free instead of CopyLeft? [on hold]

say a lot of people find the phrase "copy left" confusing so you may prefer to use "copyright-free" instead. is that ok? are they having exactly same meaning?
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3answers
38 views

a term for a “not web” traditional application

I am writing a cover letter and I would state my experience in both web application and "normal programs". "Normal programs" sounds so bad, what is a good term that I can use without delve into ...
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2answers
2k views

When someone says “that explanation was a lot of hand-waving” what does this mean?

I've been hearing term "hand-waving" thrown around a lot, especially when my peers describe their CS(computer science) classes. Does anyone know what that term means in this context? (also a little ...
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13answers
6k views

Is there a term for someone who “can see multiple perspectives”?

A colleague of mine is trying to describe herself as "capable of seeing a situation from multiple perspectives" or "able to look at the big picture from various viewpoints". I feel like there must be ...
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0answers
27 views

Is “root access” acceptable in a professional setting in Australian English?

In Australian English, which has a slang meaning of "root" which is best avoided in a professional setting, is "root access" acceptable in a professional setting? If not, what synonyms, preferably ...
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2answers
11k views

What do you call two words that contradict each other in a sentence?

I'm having trouble as to what you call two words that contradict each other. For example, "That was weirdly normal." I think this kind of word play is used in puns and jokes. But I do not know how you ...
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6answers
122 views

The word for “professional system” or “task system”

I work with software engineering and in norwegian (I'm from Norway) we have a word, "fagsystem", which refers to a software system/application that is specialized to handle a certain kind of business ...
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0answers
40 views

What do you call a registered taxpayer with no tax obligations?

What do you call a registered taxpayer with no outstanding tax-liability? I'll explain my hesitation with the term taxpayer: I take that payer means someone who pays money, so a taxpayer is someone ...
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1answer
50 views

What does “falling and missing the ground” mean?

I don't understand the use of the phrase "falling and missing the ground". How can one fall and miss the ground? What does it mean? Update Apologies. I found the use of the phrase at ...
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1answer
202 views

generic reference, specific reference, and “particular reference”?

Webs are beautiful. (I'm sure it is a generic reference.) The web is beautiful. (I'm sure it is a specific reference.) The Web is beautiful. (This web refers to the World Wide Web, a specific web in ...
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2answers
72 views

Inherency as used in policy debate

Policy debate uses the word "inherency" in an unusual way. One side in the debate proposes a plan and part of what they are obliged to show is that the plan will not happen in the status quo. This is ...
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1answer
31 views

Monochrome vs. Monochromatic

What is the usage difference for the words monochrome (as an adjective) and monochromatic? Various dictionaries seem to have nearly identical definitions for the two words.
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1answer
40 views

What is generic name for devices like this?

Well, problem is programming-related, but main problem is a naming, so I guess it's a correct place to ask. I have various type of devices designed to affect environment conditions. Typical examples ...
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3answers
45 views

Collective term for physical as opposed to virtual (digital) destinations

I am looking for a word or phrase that encapsulates the following collection of nouns in the sense that they are all physical, proper entities, and that you can go inside them: Words that apply to ...
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1answer
70 views

Specific word used for the combining of past and current experience

I am looking for the specific word used for the combining of past experience with new. It is one word and I don't think it was Latin based but I just don't remember...
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1answer
37 views

what do you call a table that contains counts of items which have 2 characteristic attributes represented by the rows and columns?

What do we call a table that holds counts? A binning table? Frequency table? Unnormalized probability density table? What if, instead of a table, it's just a list? And what if the table has more than ...
4
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1answer
1k views

Is there a name for when the same word is used at the beginning and end of different phrases/sentences?

Is there a name for when one phrase ends with a word that starts the next phrase. For instance: life is a peach and cream Or sunscreen in the eye for detail Or (from Dave Eggers' ...
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1answer
36 views

'The Underlying Ethos'

The other day I stumbled upon a tricky English sentence: 'In a significant departure from the underlying ethos of the Thatcher era, Cameron declared, in his speech, that...' I'm not too sure about ...
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4answers
426 views

How did nominal come to mean “within acceptable tolerances”?

The word "nominal" has a number of definitions. For example, the Free Dictionary gives seven: nom·i·nal (nm-nl) adj. a. Of, resembling, relating to, or consisting of a name or names. ...
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0answers
44 views

Any terms meaning the 'first snow of autumn'?

I am wondering if there is a term for the 'first snow of autumn'. The word I am looking for could come from the semantic field of meteorology, or perhaps farming etc. I know of the terms 'killing ...
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1answer
37 views

What is term for a 'person who doesn't have own decision'? [closed]

What is the English word/term for a 'Person who doesn't have own decision' & do things only for others?
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2answers
58 views

Similar meaning to 'abstract' and 'concrete'?

I'm looking for some terminology. This terminology is mostly only paired with a specific part of speech (I believe verbs). Essentially, some verbs can easily be seen and some verbs cannot easily be ...
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3answers
78 views

What is the etymology of 'munge'?

My own brief investigation into the etymology of munge yielded the following entry from The New Hacker's Dictionary: [derogatory] To imperfectly transform information. A comprehensive ...
3
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3answers
140 views

Term for a coup of the government led by corporations?

Is there a word to describe a coup of the government led by corporations?
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9answers
3k views

What's an item called that was required to progress in a video game, but now isn't?

This question was inspired by an Arqade question: How do I save a Destiny warp drive?. The premise is this: In order to progress to mission 3 (or 4 etc.) you must complete the second mission. The ...
3
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1answer
36 views

A Term or Expression for Recursion in a Lucid Dream

I occasionally have lucid "false awakening" dreams (the most recent occasion being this past night) where I know I'm dreaming, I have the conscious will to wake up, and when I attempt to wake up it ...
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1answer
60 views

Is there a word to describe a work of art that relies on astronomical conditions?

I have two examples in mind. The first is this stunning Veterans' Memorial, and the second is the more prosaic and common examples of analemnas in art, the one in the movie Castaway, for example. ...
2
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1answer
57 views

What could we call a “market for predicting decisions”?

I've always called these "decision markets", and will do so here to simplify the language in this discussion. But that term is overused to the point of being confusing, and I'm curious if anyone can ...
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2answers
286 views

Inverted conditional sentence using 'can' and 'will'

On this page in Wikipedia!, it states for first conditional sentences: The condition can also be expressed using the modal verb should. This form can be used to make an inverted condition ...
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2answers
147 views

“Build out” as business jargon

I have noticed an increase recently in use of the phrase "build out" when "build" would suffice. This seems to be mainly an American English phenomenon from what I can see. Here are some examples: ...
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5answers
185 views

Was the blue screen of death ever just a blue screen?

Etymologically speaking, at least according to Wikipedia, the term Blue Screen of Death: originated during OS/2 pre-release development activities at Lattice Inc, the makers of an early Windows ...
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455 views

English Typography in the 17th Century

I was browsing through some very old English texts when I came across this page from The memoires of Sir James Melvil of Hal-hill, by George Scot (1683). The first thing that struck me was the anatomy ...