Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise?

The period between sunrise and noon is called "morning", between noon and sunset is "afternoon". Is there a term for the period between midnight and sunrise? Edit/Clarification: Wikipedia defines ...
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2answers
57 views

Which term to use for electrical appliances burning

Continuous power fluctuation causes electric appliances burning. I would like to know what is the best term to be used with electric appliances burning due to high voltage or power fluctuation. I ...
5
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1answer
76 views

Minister vs. Secretary

In English language, the government structure of all countries is referred to with the terms of minister and ministry. However, in English-speaking countries, Secretary and Department are used ...
12
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4answers
13k views

What follows next in the sequence “unary, binary, ternary…”?

I looked on Oxford's online dictionary and was able to find the names identifying orders of a given degree: primary secondary tertiary quaternary quinary senary septenary octonary nonary denary -- ...
5
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2answers
63 views

Phrases like “Fifth Beatle” or “Fourth estate”

Is there a term for phrases like Fifth Beatle when there's four main Beatles, fourth estate when there were originally only three estates, or Mongolia's Third neighbor policy when it only has two ...
20
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5answers
665 views

How did “lobster” mean two different species?

This live crustacean is called astice in Italian. The one on the right is aragosta. They look very different from one another. The Italian dictionary describes the astice as having a deep (intense) ...
8
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5answers
785 views

What is the term for the origin of a cliche?

From wiki sources : A cliche is an expression, idea, or element of an artistic work which has become overused to the point of losing its original meaning or effect, even to the point of being ...
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3answers
543 views

Is there a word for opposite numbers?

Example: -100 and +100 - is there a way of describing the relationship between these numbers? Obviously, I've already come up with "opposite", is there anything else? This is for use in an email. ...
5
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2answers
174 views

Words for the “essential character” of each sense organ?

Looking at the definition for flavor and timbre, both are used to describe the "essential character" of a particular sense. If flavor is the essential character of our taste sense, and timbre is the ...
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2answers
50 views

Is there an english word that means opposite yet complementary and orthogonal without a positive/negative connotation?

I am looking for a word to use to describe technical traits of a programming language that are the opposite of each other yet complementary. There is no positive or negative connotation to either ...
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2answers
377 views

Negative versions of extreme adjectives

If something positive is "too much", it becomes negative. For example, too much security could be perceived as being trapped. Is there a term for this relation? In other words, if a word with a ...
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6answers
157 views

A word that comes close to “something that needs to improve/would benefit the end result if you'd do it differently/more efficiently”

Is there a better word to describe what the supervisor says in this examle? Someone has just finished a, by materials built, project and is presenting it to his supervisor. This person is very proud ...
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2answers
30 views

Operator, operand - term for the result?

How the result may be called when applying an operator to its operands? In eg. programming one may be familiar with a so-called "expression" like this one from a SO question: x>y && z==5 ...
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1answer
45 views

Older mineral names

When browsing through names of minerals in English, one notices that they appear to very commonly be of Latin origin or otherwise latinized or at least foreign; I mean names like "Magnetite", ...
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5answers
3k views

Etymology of a “pegged CPU”

There's a slightly obscure, slang meaning in tech circles of the word "pegged" as it relates to a computer's CPU. When it is fully utilised for a duration (at least several seconds), you can say that ...
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2answers
55 views

A term for “removing” goods from a warehouse

Related to inventory management or accounting. Suppose I have a warehouse. I have some goods in it. Then I need to either sell, discard or otherwise expend them. Now I need to indicate in my books ...
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6answers
105 views

Is there a word or phrase for helping someone when you are better equipped than them?

Is there a word or phrase for doing a favour or helping someone because you are in a better position than they are to get it done? For example, it would take me a lot longer to herd some cattle than ...
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2answers
51 views

Suffix for something that is spoken about / mentioned [on hold]

People involved in the analysis of conversational text have a frequent need to communicate about things that are spoken or written about. Similarly, we discuss the speaking or writing about a ...
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1answer
23 views

“You gotta do what you gotta do” and similar expressions

You gotta do what you gotta do. It's there because it's there. Stuff, because stuff. Does this pattern of expression have a name? Existential assertion, maybe?
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1answer
48 views

Term for greetings that are also valedictions

Is there a specialized term in linguistics for those words that, in a given language, can be used to say both hello and goodbye? For instance, I've heard tell that in Hawaii the word "aloha" is used ...
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2answers
55 views

Would this qualify as sarcasm?

Let's suppose a guest brought something inappropriate, like maybe a polo mallet and helmet, to an informal beach party (presumably to show off), and I made a snarky remark to my companion: for ...
3
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4answers
253 views

What do you call an object inserted between two pieces (of bone)

Imagine someone has a broken bone and after removing any slivers there is a void between the two bone fragments. In order to assure that the bone grows back correctly, a piece is inserted between the ...
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0answers
34 views

Is there a term for a word that when spelt backwards forms another word? [duplicate]

I'm not talking about palindromes, but rather a word like "ward" which can form the word "draw" when spelt backwards. Thank you.
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2answers
37 views

Is reducing a complex, or technical, idea into a colloquial label, phrase or expression correctly described as an abbreviation?

I hope someone can tell me if there is a formal, or technical, English word or phrase that describes the result of summarising a complicated (technical, or obscure, apply equally well here) idea into ...
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6answers
65 views

Word to describe policy that attacks the environment?

I am putting together a presentation, and for the life of me I am unable to think of the word which describes this situation. I am discussing policy promoted by the US in Latin America during the 60s ...
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3answers
693 views

What is the difference between “pallet” and “skid”

I usually call this device a pallet, but I have heard it referred to as a skid: Is there a difference between the two words (such as one is the name of the actual wooden device, the other is the ...
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0answers
7 views

Is there a term for words that consist of the same syllable repeated? [migrated]

Words such as "mama", "papa", and "cancan" have only one unique syllable, and the whole word is just that syllable repeated once. Is there a name for such words? I am aware of reduplication, but I ...
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3answers
72 views

Is there a word for “environmental needs”?

I am looking for a word that refers to the environmental needs of a species for survival (think of climatic conditions, but not necessarily restricted to climate). My native language is not English, ...
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1answer
57 views

Is there a correct techincal term used to describe a phrase or name consisting of a pair or group of homonyms; i.e., “Spring Spring?”

Is there a term to describe names or phrases consisting of two or more homonyms, such as "Spring Spring" or "Rock Rock?"
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3answers
173 views

What is the term for a group of liches?

What is the term for a group of liches? In fantasy fiction, a lich (/ˈlɪtʃ/; cognate to Dutch lijk, German Leiche, Norse lík and Swedish lik all meaning "corpse") is a type of undead creature. ...
5
votes
2answers
495 views

Why “inspector general”, and not “general inspector”, like German “Generalinspektor”? [duplicate]

I would expect the term "inspector general" to be "general inspector" instead. In part, that may be because I know the German variant as "Generalinspekteur" of "Generalinspektor". But I'm pretty ...
6
votes
1answer
106 views

Why are “dynamic” and “deontic” modalities so called?

It is said that there are three types of modality: deontic, epistemic and dynamic. Here are sample sentences for each type of modality: (1) You can stay as long as you want. [deontic] (2) ...
2
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1answer
679 views

generic reference, specific reference, and “particular reference”?

Webs are beautiful. (I'm sure it is a generic reference.) The web is beautiful. (I'm sure it is a specific reference.) The Web is beautiful. (This web refers to the World Wide Web, a specific web in ...
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1answer
394 views

What do we call those who discriminate against fat people?

Homophobia describes dislike or prejudice against homosexual people. Xenophobia describes an intense or irrational dislike or fear of people from other countries. What about those who discriminate ...
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4answers
103 views

What's the word for ‘the point at which an object loses balance’?

I'm trying to think of a formal word to describe the "tipping point" of an object. This would be the same point at which an object would be perfectly balanced.
2
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4answers
48 views

Military terminology for the outbreak of war, or events which begin a World War?

I wanted to know if there are any general terms for the outbreak of war, or ones which refer specifically to the beginnings of the World Wars.
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Word referring to process of curing meats?

I remember watching an episode of Floyd on France some time ago which described a French town as famous for their cured meats. I believe the word began with an 'H', and referred to the process of ...
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2answers
64 views

Alternative to Without further ado?

It's a cliche talk in nearly all public speaking events, regardless of the type of the gathering (academic, business, wedding) and the level/class (top League school, fortune 500 company, 200 bucks ...
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4answers
84 views

What is a good word for all sentient races?

I'm creating a historically inspired campaign where the standard fantasy races are extremely intermingled, and conflict is usually based on politics or religion, rather than species divisions. I ...
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5answers
393 views

What is the word for a group holding back one of its members trying to rise above the group?

I know that there is a word which specifically describes the following pattern: When a group will censor, cast bad votes, shout down, keep down or hold back one of its members trying to rise above ...
0
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1answer
97 views

Can a sentence be “causative”, if the subject is only implied?

Original text Please _________ by your next of kin. a. section 9 have completed b. have completed section 9 c. have section 9 completed The correct answer is c But for the life of me, I ...
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2answers
396 views

Antecedents of indefinite pronouns

Consider the sentence, "Most of the apples are fresh." Is it incorrect to say that apples is the antecedent of the indefinite pronoun most?
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2answers
110 views

Specific word used for the combining of past and current experience

I am looking for the specific word used for the combining of past experience with new. It is one word and I don't think it was Latin based but I just don't remember...
3
votes
6answers
313 views

Better term for clergyperson?

I'm creating a database that will include many types of people, and am faltering on the best way to classify "clergypeople". I'd prefer not to have separate entries for Deacon, Pastor, Priest, ...
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1answer
57 views

Is there a word for women who use prostitutes?

Men who use prostitutes are colloquially called johns. Is there a specific word for women who use prostitutes?
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3answers
154 views

Is 'bug' a term or a slang word?

In my answer to the question about the opposite for bug in programming, I referred to 'bug' as a slang word. Shaun Wilson, in his comment insists on 'bug' being a term that derived from a historical ...
0
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1answer
295 views

specific term for words that imitate sounds

I often in children's literature come across the rrrrrrrrrrrrS when a plane take off and the bumpity-bump when someone falls, etc. and I am wondering if these are called with a specific term? written ...
6
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3answers
1k views

Word for a Rare Feeling

I hope it's not too rare, but at least 1 other person has confirmed having experienced a similar feeling. Small, ordinary things can trigger it, in ordinary situations. Then I sometimes get the ...
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2answers
34 views

What is the most widely accepted term for “circumventing support channels or standard operating procedures to gain faster or better service”?

Particularly in the case of tech support, what is the most widely accepted "correct" term for the act of artificially escalating a user or customer request, or maybe even circumventing support, ...
3
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2answers
587 views

What do you call a word whose meaning changes according to when or where it is said?

I remember learning a specific name for words whose meaning depends on the time or location of their use, but as this was when I was in middle school (about 10 years ago), I can't remember what ...