Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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3
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4answers
437 views

Negative versions of extreme adjectives

If something positive is "too much", it becomes negative. For example, too much security could be perceived as being trapped. Is there a term for this relation? In other words, if a word with a ...
4
votes
3answers
251 views

Term for an argument which cannot be distinguished from sarcasm/jest

What is the word or phrase identifying an argument or statement for which, based on the source, you cannot tell whether the person is being honest or not? The kind of argument or statement where you ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

Word for cutting a sentence in half the rest of the meaning inferred

Is there any word for cutting off a sentence on purpose when the rest of the sentence can be inferred? I see this used sometimes when someone is talking about a grave danger. It is sometimes finished ...
13
votes
3answers
400 views

Term for converting to black&white

Is there a single word to denote reducing the color palette of an image to two colors: black and white? For instance, navy becomes black and beige turns into white. I know there is desaturate, but ...
1
vote
4answers
66 views

What is the antonym of “isolated” in the context of chemical substance?

I am looking for a word which would mean "not an isolated substance". I would use "blend" or "mixture", but these would imply that the components where isolated in the first place and then blended ...
0
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0answers
25 views

Street intersection name [on hold]

What is the proper way to call a street intersection? Do we call it Sixth and Spring or Spring and Sixth?
0
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3answers
72 views

What's it called in english to be cautious about something you do?

Is there a term in english for where you want to describe the discreet or cautious approach you take, when you want to make sure you're not risking or jeopardizing anything in doing a routine job? ...
9
votes
5answers
230 views

Is there a specific word for “jolted from naïveté”?

In the example quoted below, I used surprised with intended meaning "jolted from naïveté", but wasn't satisfied with it. Also, I wanted to avoid implying that discovering the mentioned fact made me ...
0
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3answers
95 views

The phrase “more sharp” vs “sharper”

So I was talking to my fiancee and she said "more sharp" to which I said "you mean sharper?". This is in context of talking about her current earrings being "more sharp" then her usual ones. She then ...
2
votes
1answer
992 views

generic reference, specific reference, and “particular reference”?

Webs are beautiful. (I'm sure it is a generic reference.) The web is beautiful. (I'm sure it is a specific reference.) The Web is beautiful. (This web refers to the World Wide Web, a specific web in ...
1
vote
2answers
27 views

What is name for saying “I feel X” as differentiating it for simply stating “X”

I am looking for the term describing the difference between: "The hotel is perfect." "I feel the hotel is perfect." I am making a case that sentences with only this difference can be considered ...
13
votes
15answers
2k views

Name for a device purposefully put together from faulty parts

A tech jargon question: A friend thought he once heard a funny (?) jargon word for a device that was put together from faulty parts on purpose, maybe even with the very questionable intention to sell ...
2
votes
4answers
89 views

Why 'blood vessels' and not 'blood tubes'?

I have a silly question. The way I imagine arteries and veins are as tubes that arise from one part and carry blood to the other part. Why do we call them 'vessels' (which reminds us of cooking ...
1
vote
2answers
46 views

A site where human bones have been discovered

Is there a shorter way of saying "other sites where human bones have been discovered"? I mean a site that is not a burial site, e.g a person has an heart attack, falls down on the ground and dies but ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

What is the origin of the phrase “Sharp Showers” in UK Met Office Forecasts

The UK Meterological Office is the government body responsible for weather forecasting here. On TV and radio forecasts, they have taken to using the phrase "sharp showers" to indicate sudden, heavy ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Is there a term for nouns that describe the performance of a verb?

There are nouns that describe the performance of, or ability to perform a verb? E.g. perception / perceive communication / communicate collaboration / collaborate Is there a term for these nouns ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

Is there a correct techincal term used to describe a phrase or name consisting of a pair or group of homonyms; i.e., “Spring Spring?”

Is there a term to describe names or phrases consisting of two or more homonyms, such as "Spring Spring" or "Rock Rock?"
29
votes
6answers
4k views

Etymology of a “pegged CPU”

There's a slightly obscure, slang meaning in tech circles of the word "pegged" as it relates to a computer's CPU. When it is fully utilised for a duration (at least several seconds), you can say that ...
6
votes
5answers
1k views

What would you call this “double entry” principle in English?

There is a system for entering the number of the ball that falls out in a lottery game. It consists of two computers operated by two different people. They each have to enter the ball number they see ...
2
votes
1answer
36 views

Enter or insert into the orbit?

There is a term orbit insertion which means a maneuver performed by a spacecraft flying by a celestial body in order to become an artificial satellite. What word or phrase would you use to describe ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Formatting of defined terms

In my report, I am defining/describing some terms. What is a proper way to start and format a sentences like: The term crawling denotes the practice of ... Should I put the word/term crawling in ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

What would you call the “neutral” variety in a range of food products?

Imagine you are naming a range of packaged, vegan, meat-like pan-fry kebab products that come with different marinades. There's a Curry, a Döner Kebab, and a Gyro. The final product of the range ...
4
votes
5answers
1k views

What do you call the action of making desserts?

A person who makes desserts is called a pastry chef, but is there a name for the action itself of making desserts? "Cooking" is too general, and "baking" implies bread, cakes, etc. which is not quite ...
13
votes
10answers
2k views

What do you call something that is not first in a sequence?

Is there a word to describe something that is not the first element in a sequence, but can be in any other position? A synonym of "not first", in fact. This element is __ in this sequence.
1
vote
1answer
66 views

The fear of not seeing one's mother ever again

Is there a word to describe the fear of never again seeing one's mother (or at least any person)? I have already checked the list of phobias that Wikipedia offers but could not find anything that ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Is trypophobia a real word?

When I took psychology a semester ago, my teacher insisted that she has never heard of the word. When looked up in Merriam Webster's Dictionary, it did not pop up. Do medical professionals use this ...
2
votes
1answer
25 views

Parenthetical plural of unique examples

Sometimes media announcers, especially sports and business reporters, will make their examples plural, or parenthetically plural, even though those examples are obviously unique. For example, an NPR ...
10
votes
6answers
144 views

Why is it called an Asynchronous method?

I was looking for an antonym for asynchronous (for documentation purposes) when I discovered that asynchronous means "not in parallel". To me an asynchronous call was always one that effectively ran ...
2
votes
1answer
142 views

What is the word for fear of fear?

What is the word for fear of fear? I thought this would be easy to find, recall, or previously asked, but I've looked around and couldn't find it (phobia list). It is simply phobiaphobia? Or ...
-2
votes
1answer
162 views

Reasonable phobia name for fear of alcohol evaporating before you can drink it [closed]

I am curious as to what the phobia name would be for the fear of the alcohol in your drink evaporating before you can drink it. It appears most phobias are rooted in Greek and sometimes Latin. Some ...
-2
votes
1answer
57 views

Fear of Information, which has been proven by statically data [closed]

What is the psychological terminology for the fear of being presented with facts or shunning/deliberately ignoring facts?
2
votes
2answers
3k views

“Regress” vs. “retrogress”

What do each of them mean exactly? Is either (or both) the opposite of "progress"? Could someone please explain the difference? To add some context: When I look up the definitions I see the ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

When was the term “gender essentialism” coined, and when did it come into common usage?

When was the term "gender essentialism" coined, and when did first it come into common usage? I was under the impression that the concept originated though the feminist existentialism work of authors ...
6
votes
5answers
2k views

American term for “sparkling water”?

Carbonated water doesn't seem to be as popular in the US as in Europe as far as I know (correct me if I am wrong) but I suppose some people in the US drink it. What is the most common American term ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

General technical term that uncontroversially encompasses both bacteria and viruses

We can speak of "microbes" or "micro-organisms," and I used to think that these terms clearly included viruses. And they are used this way by at least some other people; here's a website that refers ...
1
vote
1answer
83 views

Origin of term “Microbe” [closed]

What's the origin of the term microbe? According to related definitions and topics, I think it may be micro + be. If it is, what does "be" stand for?
6
votes
1answer
963 views

What is the word that sounds like “caromize” which means “cook a dish until we can reduce the juice in that dish to being viscous”?

OK, once I watched the Master Chef program and I heard people use a word that sounds like "caromize" to express the meaning of “cook a dish until the juices of the dish has reduced and is viscous”. ...
2
votes
4answers
1k views

Difference between “Registration” and “Enrollment”

I'm developing a scholar system which I have to support english(and others) language. This system haves an "Enrollment" proccess. I've called it as "Enrollment" after some research because I could not ...
-3
votes
2answers
82 views

Why “resolution” means “number of pixels” [closed]

For whatever reason, word "resolution" (which has a very different meaning) people began to use as the determinant of the size?
1
vote
3answers
54 views

What is the word for this military term, more specific than “envoy”?

"Envoy" apparently means messenger or representative, but the military term I want needs to be more specific. I'm thinking of a group, or just one person, who goes out before battle, meets the enemy, ...
-4
votes
4answers
916 views

Is “Milk and honey” a way to describe curvy women?

In Czech there is a term used for curvy women: krev a mlíko "Krev a mlíko" means "blood and milk". In this term, "blood" is a reference to red cheeks on a girl (which was considered a sign of ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “pallet” and “skid”

I usually call this device a pallet, but I have heard it referred to as a skid: Is there a difference between the two words (such as one is the name of the actual wooden device, the other is the ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

Sword of Damocles

In an amusing Greek parable, Dionysius II teaches his courtier Damocles that luxury and wealth also come with responsibility and peril. This has given rise to the term Sword of Damocles. However, ...
1
vote
2answers
147 views

Specific word used for the combining of past and current experience

I am looking for the specific word used for the combining of past experience with new. It is one word and I don't think it was Latin based but I just don't remember...
2
votes
6answers
566 views

A parent who has more than one child with one or more partners: “Poly-what?”

A polyglot is someone who can speak many languages; something that is polychromatic has many colours, and polysemy is a word or phrase with multiple meanings If polygamy is having more than one ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

Word for “A Song that Sets a Scene in a Particular Region or Culture”

This is a technical term in theater and movie arts for a stereotyped piece of music that is played to cue the audience that a scene is set in a particular location. E.g. London --> Rule ...
11
votes
10answers
2k views

I am trying to remember a word/phrase that is often used to describe backwards and heavy handed laws

I am having the darndest time trying to remember this word/phrase. I have seen it used many times over the years to describe laws, rules, and policies that are usually very heavy handed and backwards ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Word for “example of what not to do”

I found the term "anti-example" when googling for a word that means "example of what not to do" but I've never heard of it being used in common usage and googling it doesn't seem to lead to any ...
6
votes
5answers
89k views

Why use BCE/CE instead of BC/AD?

When I was a kid, I was always taught to refer to years using BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini / year of our Lord). However, I somewhat regularly hear people referring to years as in the CE ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

How do you call a road without asphalt?

What is the right word to call a road without asphalt? I found the term "beaten path", but it seems to be used mostly for human-made (rather than car-made) paths within a forest. What I need to ...