Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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Is there a shorter/better term for disagreement in number than singular-plural mismatch?

Consider someone mentioning "a bacteria", where the number of the pronoun doesn't match that of the noun. I suppose one could say there's disagreement in number, or the pronoun doesn't match its ...
7
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1answer
100 views

Why is “violated” being used as future perfect with a person as the object?

On Aviation StackExchange, I've seen these: I don't think you will be violated.. He was subsequently violated... Pilot [...] may now be violated for it. ... pilots have been violated... It seems ...
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2answers
1k views

How To Pronounce “IFRS”?

How to pronounce "IFRS," International Financial Reporting Standards? Anybody knows its phonetic symbols with IPA symbols?
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2answers
6k views

What words can I use to describe trends in graphs for the IELTS exam (e.g. “increase”, “growth”)? [closed]

What is the difference between increase, growth, go up and rise? And what is the difference between decline, fall, go down and drop? I really don't know which is the best to describe parts of a graph. ...
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1answer
50 views

Generic term for either debit or credit

In double-entry accounting, transactions are a series of debits and credits applied onto various accounts. What English term could be used to represent something that is either a debit or a credit in ...
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2answers
2k views

What does an odometer measure? Another term for “mileage”

I'm developing a software application in which users must enter odometer values of their cars. I'm looking for the correct term for the variable/database field that stores an odometer reading. Terms ...
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2answers
353 views

Is there a term for the device of titling named chapters in a work of fiction?

Does anyone know if there's a term that describes the device of titling chapters in a work of fiction? That is, chapters not simply called "Chapter 1", "Chapter 2", etc., but chapters with unique ...
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2answers
48 views

Does “the military” refer to any military?

When someone uses the term "the military" is it implied they are talking about the military of the current country they are in, or any military? For example I sometimes see on application forms "Have ...
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2answers
268 views

Something like antonym for “dependent”

Let's suppose I have two objects – A and B. They are a pair. I mean that we will name them considering them one logical unit. For example: If I call A as "driven," then B will be called ...
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3answers
1k views

Term for the person working with chocolate

What is the term for a person working professionally with chocolates (stuffed chocolates and alike of the finer sort)? I'm looking for the "title" of such a person in the same manner as the word ...
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4answers
68 views

Term for people that think the minority or farfetched view is always the truth? [on hold]

Not just limited to conspiracy theorists, but folks who have a tendency to believe in alternative, super minority views as THE truth and strongly believe in them with little validation or proof. They ...
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3answers
4k views

What is a group of dragonflies?

As per title, what is the name of a group of dragonflies? Some friends say it is a mob, some say it is a hover. Anyone?
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5answers
56 views

A term for “utopic tool”

This question is more philology than engineering. As a non native speaker, I am looking for a word in english to describe a tool that has reached its perfection. So it is a synonym for ...
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3answers
101 views

A finger is a component of a hand, a hand is the X of a finger

I'm working with a set of relationships between things, relationships that need descriptors. John is a child of Susan, Susan is a parent of John; a parent-child relationship. Milk is a ...
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2answers
1k views

“pros and cons”, “black and white”, “ups and downs”. Always in a fixed sequence, is there a word or phrase for these?

Is there a word or phrase for two nouns or adjectives joined by a conjunction (usually "and") in a fixed sequence? alive and well fast and furious hat and gloves pen and pencil ...
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1answer
20 views

term for the finalizing dialogue used when ending phone conversation

How do you term the finalizing dialogue used when ending a phone conversation.Particularly with a loved one like a close immediate family member,Partener &/or offspring.
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2answers
379 views

Is the word multimedia redundant?

So, the correct plural form of medium is media. Of course, there are exceptions, and the words have taken on new usages (such as adding a definitive article "the" to media, making it singular), but ...
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4answers
1k views

Linguistics term for word choice

I was taught a word once by a linguist. I can't remember it, but it would be very useful for a Google search I am trying to do to solve another question on a different StackExchange. It was a similar ...
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1answer
218 views

Is there a linguistic term for “word pairs” where the masculine term is positive but its feminine equivalent is not?

The feminine form usually has a neutral to negative range of meanings. e.g. master (“a man who controls things”) x mistress (“a woman who is having sex with a married man”) governor (“the chief ...
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3answers
865 views

What are people, male or female, working in a Brothel, called?

They sure are not called call girls or hookers (absolutely not!). I don't believe "call girls" because these are people working in an establishment, right there, not making calls, not that 'kind'. ...
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2answers
48 views

Origins of the sports idiom “playing 500”, meaning same number of wins/losses

In sports, people often say that a team is "playing 500", meaning that they have the same number of wins and losses for that season. Why not say "fifty fifty" or "half and half" or "50 percent"? Why ...
6
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5answers
641 views

J. Oliver's usage of the word 'bog'

I have a question about the usage of the word 'bog' in the following sentence: Bog standard scoops of ice cream etc I understand that the meaning is 'form'; nevertheless, this is the first time ...
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1answer
41 views

Can anyone advise on a guide to the usage of “enote”?

I am looking to use "enote" in a mathematical description where the symbol occurs before the concept, and denote seems inappropriate. (I suppose with rewriting this can be overcome, but that's a ...
4
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1answer
129 views

What word describes writing a word someone else said while trying to write something else?

I was trying to write "diagram" and someone said "poop" and I ended up trying to write "diapoop." I quickly caught myself, but I've always wanted to know what word is used for this phenomenon, if ...
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1answer
18 views

Scientific Nomenclature: italics or roman in an italic environment

Scientific Nomenclature says that: Italics are used for bacterial and viral taxa at the level of family and below. All bacterial and many viral genes are italicized. Serovars of Salmonella ...
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2answers
215 views

Is there a more generic word for “space objects” (not counting human-made or massive objects)?

Basically, objects like Asteroids Meteoroids Meteors Meteorites Comets Etc. As stated in the title, this also doesn't count human-made objects, such as Space junk Satellites, Space stations, ...
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24answers
8k views

What's a good term for source code that could theoretically still run, but is purposefully not?

I'm a software engineer. There are many times when I write a good chunk, or even the entirety of, a feature, but opt not to make it actually run in the program for some reason or another. This code is ...
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4answers
65 views

An adjective for your place of origin when it differs from your place of birth ? (like in Switzerland)

My question may seem strange since in most English-speaking countries, someone's origin is defined by their place of birth (at least that is what I think). But in Switzerland your origin is defined by ...
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21answers
22k views

What is the word for always YES (100%) or always NO (0%), never in-between

For example: 1) In statistics, this attribute will always either be 0% or 100%, never in-between. 2) The boundary is either safe or destroyed, because there is never a state where it is only ...
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0answers
80 views

Term for phrases which are synonymous as a whole but antonymous on a literal reading

Is there a term of phrases where there are multiple ways to say the same meaning (that is, the phrases are synonymous), but on the surface, the structure of at least some of the phrase components have ...
2
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3answers
59 views

Is “apt alliteration's artful aid” actually alliterative?

... and if not, what is it? This cropped up in a facebook expat group that I am in, when one commentor insisted it is assonance, not alliteration. As the only linguist in the group I was called on to ...
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0answers
20 views

Meaning of “plummeted” in this sentence [migrated]

I'd be very grateful if anyone could explain me the meaning of thes sentence in bold "Payroll was cut by more than half. Oil reserves jumped. The time it took to drill a deep-water well plummeted. ...
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4answers
8k views

Is there a term for letting out an exasperated sigh through the nose?

Is there a term for when a person is getting really irritated/frustrated by someone, but they don't want to yell, so they do that thing where they exhale sharply through their nose? Say, for example, ...
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2answers
50 views

“Cross-posting” - is this word able to be used literally nowadays?

"Cross-posting" is the act of asking a question of more than one site within a system. As far as I know, it has always had a poor reputation, because doing so encourages answers that are not seen ...
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1answer
73 views

past progressive with dependent clause — dependent clause types in the face of ambiguity

I'm trying to explain how to contrast the following two sentences in a meaningful - detailed - way. I was eating when a bee stung me. I was eating when I was on a break. The intention is to ...
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1answer
119 views

What do you call the use of a negative clause to end a claim by questioning it?

I mean the clause at the end, seemingly asking for confirmation of the claim. You would like to sleep, wouldn't you? How is this called?
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9answers
6k views

Term for a doorway without a door

Is there a specific term I could use in a floor plan for the doorway leading from one room to another? For example: a person is in the living room and looks through the "doorway" that leads into the ...
7
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1answer
993 views

What are these containers called?

The german term is Absetzmulde (Image search). They look like this: Image source: Sirch GmbH There are varios different styles of bulk goods containers that can be easily loaded on/off a truck, but ...
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2answers
231 views

Specific word used for the combining of past and current experience

I am looking for the specific word used for the combining of past experience with new. It is one word and I don't think it was Latin based but I just don't remember...
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0answers
83 views

Phrasal verbs with synonymous opposites

There are some cases in English where one can substitute in a word that normally has an opposite meaning, but instead produces the same meaning. For examples, consider the following meanings and ...
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1answer
27 views

What do we call a “manuscript expert”?

Someone (in most cases an academic) who is well-rounded in the field of ancient manuscripts, with solid training in history and/or literature, one or more ancient languages, paleography, and ...
3
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2answers
215 views

Why is salt being referred to as “sodium”? [closed]

Why is salt referred to as "sodium" in nutrition facts (like on products) and similar documents in some parts of the world? Why is that nutrition facts labels in some parts of the world list salt ...
4
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5answers
605 views

What are the holes in ice trays called?

I watched a video where the guy called the holes in ice trays "cuplets". I was sure this wasn't an official word, so I did a thorough Google search for what those were called but I could't find any ...
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5answers
431 views

If 'native' means “born to a place”, can I call myself a Native American? Why not?

I was born in the US, have lived here all my life. I am as native to it as anyone. Can I call myself a Native American? Don't people from other countries refer to themselves this way? What is ...
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0answers
17 views

Reported Usage Vs. Actual Usage

I'm currently writing a linguistics research essay and my professor wanted me to explain the differences between "reported usage" and "actual usage" of inter-dental stopping based on the surveys I ...
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6answers
115 views

What do you call a person who is dogmatic in their opinion until someone they see as an authority has an opposing view, and they then flip?

I used to think this was actually being dogmatic, but when I actually wrote that the other day I decided to check myself, and it doesn't appear to be the case, however I'm fairly certain there is a ...
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1answer
77 views

What is the correct name of a student's set of answers to a test or exam paper? [closed]

I am not not sure whether it should be called an answer script or an answer(ed) paper. Or is there better names? What should I call the “list of answers” a student gives in a test? just refers to a ...
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1answer
32k views

What does a series of dots (elipses) mean after a sentence?

For example you send an email to a acquaintance or friend. "I've been busy. Recovering from unexpected surgery. My recovery is going well. I will send information on that hobby to you soon. Hope ...
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5answers
2k views

What is the proper way to say “queryer”

That is, the person who is querying. The person who sends can be a sender, the person who receives can be a receiver. Similarly the person who responds (to a query) can be a responder. But can ...
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0answers
25 views

What is the origin of the phrase “inconvenient knowledge” [closed]

Richard McCombs 2013 book, The Paradoxical Rationality of Søren Kierkegaard, contains this passage: "...the suspicion arises that the purpose of this investigation may well be to forget one's ...