Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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Term to express a range of fluctuation

I am trying to make a term for a function equipped on an image sensor. The term is to express "the upper limit of fluctuation allowance in image size which is specified in %" The value of percentage ...
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1answer
128 views

What does it mean when a denomination is described to be “pietistic”? [closed]

What does it mean when a denomination or theological tradition is described to be "pietistic"? The definitions of Merriam-Webster for "pietistic" mean: of or relating to Pietism a : of or ...
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2answers
2k views

Of Yuppies and Yippies and Hippies

While innocently passing by on my way to Big Rep City, I happened to overhear (alright! I was dropping eaves) a dialogue in some podunk Commentary Cafe wherein two fellow ELU consumers were debating ...
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2answers
37 views

“First day after expiration date” term

What term can be used to define the first day of the time interval where an item expires? For example, my driving license expires on 2015.01.31; the date of 2015.02.01 is "first day of invalidity" or ...
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0answers
36 views

Term for Successful Sale after Demoing Product

I believe there is a business term for such an event, but I can't recall what it is. An example would be a vacuum salesman showing a prospective buyer how a vacuum works, and the buyer ends up ...
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5answers
163 views

How to name non-web software? [duplicate]

I am writing an article that is focus on websites and web applications. I also need to refer to the rest software products. But I don't know how to properly name them. I could say "non-web software", ...
3
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3answers
236 views

What is the origin of “pre-plan”?

Although I searched fairly extensively, I couldn't find any references as to the origins of pre-plan. According to Online Etymology Dictionary, pre-arranged and prearranged have existed since 1792 ...
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2answers
119 views

What is the skill of “remembering all the variables involved in a situation” called?

What is the skill of being able to recall to mind all of the variables involved in a situation called? For instance, if I have to get together a bunch of documents for a lawyer, and he asks for all ...
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2answers
118 views

Is the phrase “logic and reason” grammatically correct?

I have always interpreted logic to mean a systematic form (premise-reason-conclusion) of reason. So it seems that you are saying one word (reason) and a branch of that word (logic). But the "and" ...
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2answers
135 views

What kind of wordplay is this?

In his book Humorous English, Evan Esar gives example uses of devices he broadly labels synonymics. He writes of synonymic puns: Many a wife sends her husband to an early grave with a series of ...
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4answers
181 views

Some good derogatory terms for nobility or upper class? [closed]

I'm in need of some derogatory terms for nobles for a story I'm writing, something for a fantastical medieval based world. The more the merrier!
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1answer
76 views

Older mineral names

When browsing through names of minerals in English, one notices that they appear to very commonly be of Latin origin or otherwise latinized or at least foreign; I mean names like "Magnetite", ...
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4answers
147 views

Looking for a word describing “habits which lost their original purpose”

I know there is a certain word which could describe rituals/habits which are being practiced despite the fact they lost their original purpose. I saw it in context of practicing some religious ...
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1answer
270 views

Is there a technical name for this kind of wordplay?

In his book Humorous English, Evan Esar writes, The blended compound is the fusion of two compounds, with the terminal word of one being the same or similar to the initial word of the other. By ...
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3answers
2k views

Is there a term for letting out an exasperated sigh through the nose?

Is there a term for when a person is getting really irritated/frustrated by someone, but they don't want to yell, so they do that thing where they exhale sharply through their nose? Say, for example, ...
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9answers
5k views

Opposite of “mutually exclusive”

The best I can think of is "necessarily accompanying", but it sounds awkward. Most answers I looked up give words like "concordant" and "accompanying", but these words have more passive definitions ...
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1answer
80 views

What do you call getting something in a video game at the very last second?

I remember there was a game in which you had to collect powerups while you were on a minetrack, and there were some jumps you had to make at the very last second to get certain power ups. Basically, ...
6
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1answer
291 views

“He is a genius, he is.” Is there a term for the “he is” addition to this sentence?

Just as we have tail-questions (or question tags), affirmative additions to affirmative remarks ("so do I", "so did he") and negative additions to negative remarks ("neither do I", "neither would I", ...
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1answer
64 views

Any term for an indirect reference/name for something?

Euphemism and dysphemism would be hyponyms of such a term, with positive and negative connotations of meaning respectively. I don't think "synonym" quite describes what I'm getting at here, though, ...
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1answer
315 views

What's the expression for the port of boarding of a flight?

What would be an appropriate formal expression to describe the place from which the plane is going to take off? For e.g. a flight travels from London, Heathrow (LHR) to New Delhi, Delhi Indira Gandhi ...
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6answers
261 views

What would be an appropriate word for a medicine that prevents Alzheimer's Disease?

Medicines that people take or give to their children and pets in the hope of preventing infectious diseases are called "vaccines", "immunizations", "inoculations", or "prophylactics". In discussing ...
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2answers
1k views

What do we call a doctor's prediction

Say my doctor tells me that my grandfather has only a few months to live. What do we call such a prediction based on a medical condition?
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5answers
720 views

What is the Single Word for Burning Alive?

Is there any single word substitute for 'Burning Alive'? We've Behead for 'Cut off the head'. Similar way, What is the Single word equivalent for 'Burning Alive' If any?
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3answers
113 views

Is there a name for questions where the answer is not important? [duplicate]

A question where you don't care about the answer. e.g. "how are you today?" where you don't actually care what the answer is. Is it a polite question?
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1answer
153 views

What does “Tender on a bid…” mean? [closed]

You have been asked by your manager to tender on a bid to develop [x] for [x]. What does "Tender on a bid" mean in this context?
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3answers
132 views

What is the function of “such as” in this sentence?

You should take an AP class, such as U.S. History or English Literature. Many countries, such as Canada, New Zealand, and Switzerland, have more than one official language. In a sentence ...
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1answer
50 views

A noun: the tool to fix neck in the neck sprain treatment

What is the tool to fix one's neck in a neck sprain treatment? It could be soft or hard, in plastic. I did a web search for neck fixture, but it turned out to be a component of a lamp.
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2answers
130 views

Is there an abbreviation to denote "f***k You? [closed]

I frequently see people using various facebook expressions in official e-mails or in general text message. What bemuses me is that most of the time ""F***K you" is written/put as "f**K you". Please ...
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3answers
938 views

Difference between “Registration” and “Enrollment”

I'm developing a scholar system which I have to support english(and others) language. This system haves an "Enrollment" proccess. I've called it as "Enrollment" after some research because I could not ...
4
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1answer
325 views

Terminology for words that are the same backwards and forwards, upside-down or right way up

I'm thinking of getting a SONOS sound system and have realised that it's an example of a special class of word. It's a palindrome, it's a rotational ambigram and it is also a word that is the same ...
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2answers
144 views

What is a term for having a “small” name for something that's actually “large”?

For example, referring to a 7 feet tall, 450 lb man with the nickname "Tiny".
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4answers
128 views

Looking for a word for a slavery “contract”

Suppose a person is forced by law to serve a fixed time as a slave, before they are granted freedom. What would you call this arrangement? It's not a contract or an agreement, because the slave does ...
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5answers
4k views

Are there rules to determine whether a musician's title will end with “-er” or “-ist”?

There are drummers, buglers, fifers, whistlers, and fiddlers. Folks who play all the other instruments use the -ist suffix -- pianist, violinist, cellist, tympanist, guitarist, flautist, etc, etc, ad ...
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4answers
211 views

A word to describe the type of literature read on toilet?

Is there an English word (recognised or slang) that describes the type of literature that is intended to be read in the toilet/bathroom/restroom? I've seen books in the past that seemed aimed ...
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1answer
79 views

What is the term for representing whole numbers with integers instead of English words?

For example, "I am giving you the ___ form". Where I am using numeric characters e.g., 1 instead of one. I don't think canonical exactly fits here because the English version is seems to be unique as ...
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5answers
688 views

Word to describe what an academic degree is “in”

I am trying to describe the individual components of a a list of academic degrees: AS Accounting AS Marketing BA Sociology BA Economics BS Accounting/Finance BS ...
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3answers
76 views

Is there a word for “environmental needs”?

I am looking for a word that refers to the environmental needs of a species for survival (think of climatic conditions, but not necessarily restricted to climate). My native language is not English, ...
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1answer
165 views

Is there a better term for “perfect infinitive”, “perfect participle” or “perfect gerund”?

BACKGROUND There are grammar terms such as 'present perfect' and 'past perfect' as in: She has learned English for 10 years. [present perfect] She had learned English when she was little. ...
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2answers
191 views

What do you call an abrupt, abstract ending to a sentence?

While reading the poem Pike by Ted Hughes, I came across this line: The gills kneading quietly, and the pectorals. As you can see, the line ends quite abruptly. How would one term this literary ...
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0answers
158 views

What are the words for sets of n-grams or n-cores? [closed]

Just saw that a fellow member asked similar question about series of books, however the matter with naming series of things is more complicated in my view. Many times I need the numerals, so let us ...
2
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1answer
324 views

What is an indoor Dock/Harbor called?

For more clarity, I am thinking about something more like a dock, but inside a building alongside or stretching out over a pond/ocean. There would be a wooden door which could be raised and lowered to ...
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1answer
46 views

Term: Retrograde Translations

Let's start with an example. I asked this question over on CN@SE: Translation: “世界上,治疗心脏病最好的方式就是不要开刀。”. In the question I asked for a translation of an, apparently, well-known English quote. The ...
2
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3answers
157 views

Term for numbers that have at least one non-zero significant digit after the decimal point?

So, a number that is nothing but fractions is "fractional". A number that has a whole number and a fraction is "mixed", if you want to call it that. And the portion after the decimal point is called ...
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2answers
154 views

A word describing how 'profound I am in a skill': Can you suggest one?

I am in the process of localizing an application and I can't wrap my head around a specific translation. The user can enter a skill / prof. experience they have acquired or a language they speak ...
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1answer
127 views

What is the difference between “Part of” (without 's') and “Parts of” (with 's')?

Example phrases: Part of the company is very efficient. Parts of the company are very efficient. Google search for 'parts of' has 2.5B results. 'parts of' has 650M Google search results, with ...
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0answers
122 views

How should I fill “First name” and “Last name” in U.S. documents? [closed]

How should I fill this information if I have more than one given name and more than one last name? For example, if my name is Juan Eduardo González Rodríguez. I have 2 given names: "Juan" and ...
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16answers
4k views

English word that means “a process that does not teach you anything”?

I am looking for a word that means “a process that you keep doing, hoping that you will learn something useful, but which you actually never learn anything from”. I'm quite sure that there is an ...
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4answers
90 views

What do you call the energy that has been created by fear or happiness?

There are times that we feel tired and weak and not able to get up and do something, in this situation: if we face a danger, like our house goes on fire, or become under attack, or remember that we ...
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1answer
88 views

Is there a correct techincal term used to describe a phrase or name consisting of a pair or group of homonyms; i.e., “Spring Spring?”

Is there a term to describe names or phrases consisting of two or more homonyms, such as "Spring Spring" or "Rock Rock?"
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2answers
346 views

What's the word for the when you suck snot back in your nose?

My mom and I say 'soup' like: "Why are you souping the snot back up your nose?" But I realise that this is not accurate. So what's the word?