Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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131 views

What should we call a part of a sentence which is neither a word nor a phrase?

I would like to refer to a part of a sentence which is neither a word nor a phrase, e.g., "I will recognize" in "I will recognize you". Should I call it an expression, a part of a sentence or ...
5
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3answers
58 views

The name of this grammar structure

It is a serious, and sometimes fatal, disease that may become epidemic in crowded, unsanitary living conditions. I'm trying to find the name of grammar structure (a very technological term, not ...
1
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2answers
63 views

Is there a special name for nouns that aren't preceded by an article?

This might only apply to a few nouns, but I was wondering if there is a special name for nouns that colloquially aren't preceded by an article. For example we say "eating dinner" instead of "eating a ...
2
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1answer
72 views

Early Modern English - How Many Uses of Conjugated Verbs in a Single Sentence

Using Early Modern English, can I have more than one conjugated verb in a sentence? For example, would I be more correct to say, "Thinkest thou that thou could take us to see him?" (Note that only ...
2
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0answers
36 views

A word that describes a word for which there are no words [duplicate]

I have searched the internet, read every dictionary and scanned website after website, and cannot find a word that describes a word for which there are presently, in your language, no words. Does such ...
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4answers
93 views

Is there a term for replacing name with a number/code?

For example instead of using Mrs Johnson to use Subject 2332
0
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1answer
67 views

Is there a name for the irregular spelling difference between some nouns and verbs?

Most words that have a noun-form and a verb-form (noun/verb pairs) have identical spelling, e.g. a jump (n.), to jump (v.). However, some words have different spelling: advice (n.), advise (v.) ...
0
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0answers
40 views

Juxtaposition Without Contrast

I'm writing something in which I would like to point out something that's similar to juxtaposition, but without the contrast. Specifically, I'm trying to say that the proximity of a lamp and a loaf of ...
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2answers
61 views

Need a term for all English words with a “.” at the end like “etc., Mr.” [closed]

Is there a name for words like Mr., etc., and Mrs.?
6
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5answers
1k views

Does the term “mass hero” exist in Western Countries?

"Mass Hero" is a popular term in India, especially down south, which implies an actor who has the versatility to sing, dance, romance, fight, laugh, cry, make the audience laugh and cry, apart from ...
4
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2answers
185 views

A word spoken rarely or never

I would like to know an unambiguous term used to designate words that are spoken vanishingly rarely, if at all. Words that are never spoken, _________, illustrate the fundamental difference ...
1
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1answer
55 views

“time” for instants or durations in science

I am trying to describe the evolution of a motion which is composed of smooth parts called "free flights" and instantaneous impacts. For example, consider a bouncing ball: its motion is a succession ...
10
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2answers
731 views

Is there a difference between “Who necessarily do not exist” or “who do not exist necessarily”?

This is from the English version of the book "The Name of the Rose" by Umberto Eco. Brother William was arguing that the non-Christian people should also be given the right to rule. Here are some ...
2
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4answers
49 views

Is there a word for a vocabulary associated with a particular work of fiction?

In his Lord of the Rings, J.R.R. Tolkien coins the word "glitter" to be a collective noun for elves. In his books about Wonderland, Louis Carol invents an absolute mountain of words, words like ...
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0answers
33 views

Word meaning “of a single word”, or, “word” as an adjective

I am trying to find a term to describe something as being comprised of a single word, similar to how the term monosyllabic describes something as being of a single syllable. Does such a term exist? Or ...
1
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3answers
152 views

Origins of the term “High Definition”?

I just found a 1996 VHS cassette with 'Super HD' written on it. I was under the impression that 'High Definition' is a relatively new term but it seems pretty old :D. When did 'High Definition' come ...
0
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2answers
132 views

A more common term for “rabbit cold.”

I've been quoting Lolita (as well as Don Juan, Man and Superman, Pygmalion, Tom Jones, and various Mark Twain's witticisms) for a while now; some people might be annoyed by this, but I don't care ...
5
votes
2answers
79 views

Word Hunt: Audio Player Terminology

I'm looking for a few words today, in the context of Audio Players. I'm basically looking for words that match the following definitions: Here are my current known words, and their definitions: ...
3
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1answer
308 views

Who first objected to the term “chain mail”?

Recently, I've become aware of a new (to me) peeve: some people say that "chain mail/chain-mail/chainmail" is incorrect in some way when talking about armor, and that the proper way to refer to it is ...
0
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1answer
59 views

subtract or substract

Subtract is considered the only correct verb, while substract is considered wrong or at least "very" obsolete. However, here is a guy, whose mother tongue is obviously English, and who uses substract ...
-2
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3answers
118 views

The word for not a word

A few years ago I came across a distinct word used to reference non-words. Most people's guesses are intuitive though unfortunately aren't correct as it's a very distinct word. We're not talking about ...
2
votes
2answers
90 views

A superset of contractor, employee and businesses?

I need a single word to define an employee, contractor or any business entity (e.g. sole-proprietorship, corporation) that provides services in exchange for pay. I saw ...
1
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0answers
49 views

Does OED (and other major dictionaries) use the label “Slang” or only “Informal”?

I was just looking at some slang words in dictionaries. Surprisingly they are all (that I could find) labelled "informal". I couldn't find any labelled "slang". Same deal in other major ...
3
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3answers
271 views

Difference between “spruce” and “fir” when used in “Christmas tree” context [closed]

What is the difference between the words "spruce" and "fir" (or even "fir tree")? Could they be used interchangeably, for example, when referring to a kind of evergreen trees people decorate on ...
1
vote
2answers
176 views

Is there a term for when visual negative-space and positive-space are switched

I think this is a term in the perception/cognition area of words. I recently saw this visual illusion. I don't recall the last time that I've seen this 'flipping' (to be punny) of what is ...
59
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8answers
6k views

“kinda”, “sorta”, “coulda”, “shoulda”, “lotta”, “oughta”, “betcha”, “tseasy” etc. What are these?

In linguistics, is there a term describing this phenomenon, i.e., when the syllables of two words are slurred together in the spoken language? They are not contractions. While contractions are ...
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3answers
46 views

Is there a term for sentences which structurally reflect their meaning?

Is there a term for sentences which structurally reflect their meaning? Here are some examples: I write less. The last word of this sentence is "anything". I ALWAYS WRITE IN UPPERCASE AS IF I'M ...
6
votes
2answers
193 views

Historical differences in usage of “Mrs” for “mistress” or “missus”

The title Mrs. stands for mistress, but some English native speakers claim mistress is only used to indicate the woman with whom one has an (illicit) affair and that missus is the long version of Mrs. ...
5
votes
1answer
66 views

What is the opposite of a retronym?

A retronym is the name given to an obsolete or older object to differentiate it from its newer replacement. Examples include "straight razor" (once just called "razor" until the modern razor), "analog ...
19
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7answers
3k views

What do you call a “cropped image” on a website?

Is there a particular name for this "picture of a baby seal in the comments section of facebook" of this image? I know there is "photo comment" but it doesn't point out that it is a cropped picture ...
10
votes
4answers
1k views

Term for all landmasses connected to Europe?

I'm looking for one phrase that refers to the entire landmass that makes Europe, Africa, and Asia without having to name each continent separately, much like how I can say the Americas to refer to ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

What's the meaning of “designs” in the clause below?

The undersigned agree that this Fee Protection is assignable and transferable to the beneficiaries, designs, heirs and assigns upon written notice of all parties, and shall not be amended without ...
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0answers
61 views

A term for a particular or general skill that needs to be improved and acted on?

The title says it all. I'm unable to come up with the term for something you have as a part of a skill-set that needs to be further improved upon. It may be something very simple that is also at the ...
3
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3answers
181 views

Does the law define the usage of “Immunity” and “Impunity”?

I had to edit my question because I think it led to misunderstanding. For me, the definition of "immunity" is quite different from "impunity", and I know the differences. But what I don't know is ...
0
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3answers
181 views

Is “exceptioned” a word?

The question is a little more complex than the title states. Exceptioned is not in the dictionary. But I am not trying to use this as a verb. I work in IT. We keep a list of exceptioned words that we ...
7
votes
3answers
505 views

Is there a word like “conjugate” that means switching a noun between plural and singular forms?

Changing a verb to reflect the number of people and tense of the sentence is called conjugation. Is there a word that means toggling a noun between singular and plural? ie. "The computer program ...
2
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3answers
159 views

Term for “letter obsession” [closed]

Is there a term for a person with an obsession on a single character or letter? For example: A person that is obsessed with the letter "X".
7
votes
9answers
2k views

One word for “temperature” and “humidity”

Is there a word (or a word combination) that would include both temperature and humidity, but not other parameters? Environmental conditions springs to mind, but I feel that it describes much more ...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

How to describe lists with different ordering schemes?

I'm helping someone copy a list of lines a certain number of times into a new list, and I don't know how to describe the list that we're creating. For example, let's copy a list composed of 1, 2, and ...
3
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3answers
46 views

Term for when work gets passed around instead of being executed

At work, I see a lot of this phenomena: work gets passed around instead of someone taking autonomy and seeing its execution. For example: Task: Arrange meetup for grant awardees in the Lounge area. ...
1
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3answers
76 views

Prettier term for 'Gastronomic Tolerence'

My friend came up with this one, are there any alternatives? "Someone who tolerates all kinds of eating habits" (for example, both vegetarians and non-vegetarians) Example of sentence: "Tim ...
3
votes
1answer
61 views

Name of implement used for cleaning under your nails?

What is the correct term for the implement (usually with a little flat hook) used to clean under finger- and toenails? EDIT: found an image. This is the doodad I'm talking about:
0
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2answers
21 views

Appropriate title for a committee member responsible for monitoring conflicts of interest

This is in the context of a sporting body that has occasionally had problems with officers getting too friendly with business interests associated with the sport. The body is thinking of creating a ...
1
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1answer
117 views

What's the difference between hard-boiled fiction and crime fiction?

I'm seriously confused now. I just read (in Wikipedia) that detective fiction is a sub-genre of both crime fiction and mystery. Now there's this hard-boiled thing. Those money-grubbing editors and ...
0
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0answers
20 views

Creation and Preservation: what are the terms for natural predisposition towards them?

There are tons of exceptions, of course, plus there are people who favor destruction over anything else. However: Some people are impelled towards creation, while others seek satisfaction, ...
2
votes
5answers
111 views

What's an introductory part of the title of an article/book called?

Some examples of article titles: Taking the Leap: How Sociolinguists Can Handle Divergence Closing the Gap: On Linguistic, Regional Convergence Linguistics Revisited: A Statistical Approach to ...
2
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1answer
94 views

What's the name of the action for opening a lock with an RF card?

We're constantly bombarded with new gadgets in our everyday life. Lately, hotels are moving away from ordinary locks and towards card keys. Some of them simply slide into a small slot in the lock, ...
1
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1answer
73 views

Literary term for a “placeholder” protagonist that readers/viewers “inhabit”

In some books and films, the protagonist is a "blank slate" of sorts--the character's personality is bland or never deeply developed, and he/she mainly serves as a sort of "shell" through which the ...
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1answer
47 views

Practice of foster care for illegitimate children

Apparently there existed a practice of sending bastard children to "foster care", typically a village, where village folks received some money from unacknowledged father (?) in some countries during ...
5
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1answer
276 views

“Shuttling between the anal and genital zones of development.” Huh?

Here's a quote from Lolita: "Dolly Haze," she said, "is a lovely child, but the onset of sexual maturing seems to give her trouble." I bowed slightly. What else could I do? "She is ...