Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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Origins of the gaming term “cheese strategy”

In a gaming scene the word cheese is used to describe strategies or ways of playing that are really powerful and do not require much skill from the players side at the same time. The term is widely ...
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172 views

etymology of “positive economics”

Positive economics, that is, value-free theory, is contrasted with normative economics which is value-laden. What is the etymology of positive economics?
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What are the degrees of synonymity?

In several questions and answers on this site I've read phrases that suggest there can be a scale of synonymity between words—something I haven't thought much about before. Some examples I've seen are ...
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Is the conditional a mood or a tense?

Is the conditional a mood or a tense? I've heard it described in both ways. It seems more like a mood as it is often lumped with hypothetical constructions and the subjunctive mood. I could see it ...
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What's the difference between colloquial and oral English?

What is the difference between colloquial an oral in the phrases, colloquial English and oral English?
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Why is the term “depressed” often used to describe a button which is pressed?

In several books that mention GUI, keyboard, or mouse buttons (e.g. the book Programming Windows by Charles Petzold), the authors refer to the state of a pressed button as depressed. Why is this term ...
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2answers
592 views

What is the term for starting an essay with a story or anecdote to pique the reader's attention?

I am looking for the formal academic term for this - not "opener" or "opening." I want to refer to it in a presentation about creating hooks to pull in the reader. I once knew the term but cannot ...
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Why do they say “love fifteen,” in tennis?

Why do they say "love fifteen," in tennis?
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3answers
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What's the meaning of “on notice” and “under advisement”?

Can someone please give a clear definition and distinction of these terms, as when a public figure is asked a difficult question and says: "I'll take that on notice" or "I'll take that under ...
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Garbage/stuff words

I've watched two interviews. One with Grace Park, one with Eliza Dushku. What one can't miss is that Eliza uses an awful lot of garbage words (or what these are called) — um, so, like, you know, ...
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6answers
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How to name a part of a piechart

Which term best suits to describe a part/slice/share/portion of a piechart, disregarding what the chart is about ?
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2answers
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What do first, second, and third person perspective mean? Why are they so called?

I am aware of the terms first person, second person and third person from grammar, but I have also seen them used in other contexts, in particular first person perspective with regard to video games. ...
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Inhabitants of Vatican City would be referred to as ____

Keep that blank clean. No religious flaming. What I mean is this: inhabitants of America are Americans, inhabitants of Ohio are Ohioans, and inhabitants of Cincinnati are Cincinnatians. But what ...
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2answers
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Use of the term “maths” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Math” or “Maths”? As far as I know, the term "math" is a clipped form of the word mathematics. In other words, it's already plural. So is ...
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3answers
232 views

What is the exact term for resolving all sub-domains (*.stackexchange.com) to www.stackexchange.com

The related question is asked here, and I cannot figure out it.
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3answers
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Use of the word “aforementioned”

Is it correct to use the word aforementioned in an open-ended chatting context in which the conversation backtracks, such that the item that was mentioned before (as in, earlier in time) in the ...
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5answers
1k views

How might I name the items of a Likert scale?

I'm using a Likert scale that has 5 possible items: ++ for "I strongly agree" + for "I agree" +/- for "I'm indifferent" - for "I disagree" -- for "I strongly disagree" Now I think that "I'm ...
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2answers
526 views

How are certain technical words used in British English?

I have noticed that many terms in software come from American English, as the US was responsible for much software engineering terminology. I want to know how Britishers use these terms in these ...
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3answers
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How are relative familial titles used for members who died prior to your birth?

This may seem an odd and morbid question, but I am curious about the use of relative familial titles when the family member you are referring to died prior to your birth. For example, say my mother ...
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4answers
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What are exchanges like “How are you,” “I'm fine,” and “See you later” called?

Some verbal/written exchanges convey almost no meaning but are part of the protocol of conversation. For example, somebody greets you with "How are you?" and they're not usually not listening for ...
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Meaning of “cross”?

There is a related group of drugs known as cephalosporins that exhibit a 6% cross sensitivity reaction to penicillin allergy sufferers. What's the meaning of cross in this sentence? Is ...
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1answer
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What does 'culture' mean in this sentence?

...which is often used when the physician does not (or cannot) perform a culture to determine the actual bacterium.
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1answer
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Ways to say methods of doing things

I saw a lot of usage of machinery, mechanism, to be used with similar meaning as techniques, ways, methods,.... For example, my math teacher said the machinery in the proof of some theorem is not ...
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2answers
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What does a dialogue consist of? I mean, what are these constituents called?

Tina: I had a strange dream last night. Jack: Well, dreams are always strange. I've never had an absolutely "normal" dream. So what did you dream about? Tina: I dreamed about a skyscraper ...
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Term for same root word but words with different meaning

Some words have the same etymology, root, but mean different things, such as mysterious and mystical. What are some other pairs (or more) that fall into this category, and what exactly is this ...
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2answers
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What does 'corporeal form' mean?

These series, however, are only one particularly obvious example; throughout practically the whole of chemistry, even in the various nitrogen oxides and oxygen acids of phosphorus or sulfur, one ...
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What is a group of dragonflies?

As per title, what is the name of a group of dragonflies? Some friends say it is a mob, some say it is a hover. Anyone?
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In which context is “lignicolous” used?

Is lignicolous a word used in a specific context, or is it common to say "that is a lignicolous bug"?
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2answers
983 views

What adjective would best describe adjectives that are related to feelings?

Joyful, happy, angry, hilarious, lovable, annoying, poignant, melancholic, depressing, cheerful, hateful, etc. All these ones are adjectives. Some of them can be applied to those objects who ...
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Are there any rules governing what we call people from different countries?

people from China = Chinese people from Japan = Japanese people from Australia = Australian people from Lebanon = Lebanese people from Sweden = Swedish Are there any rules that ...
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6answers
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Example of sentence using “sang-froid”

In which context should sang-froid be used? Can you provide an example?
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1answer
919 views

What is the name of equipment that is used in films, like when saying “scene one, take two”?

What is the name of equipment that is used in films, like when saying "scene one, take two"? The equipment is usually black and white in color.
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What is this an example of: “FOR SALE: Car by elderly lady with new body and spare tire”

Historical examples: Croesus asked the oracle what would happen if he attacked Persia. The reply: ‘A mighty empire will be humbled’. Thank you so much for the book. I shall lose no time in ...
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3answers
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“Trust” vs. “Cartel”

The establishment of trust is quite difficult but for cartel it is comparatively easy. What is the difference between trust and cartel? Does the word "oligopoly" have a different meaning in ...
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Term for increasing military presence at sea

What term expresses an increase of troops or other military units in a standoff between two armies, when no actual fighting has yet occurred? Specifically, I'm looking for something in the context of ...
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What is the term for neglectful spelling of words such as “you” as “u”?

The age of texting and instant messaging as we all know has created a phenomenon of using shorter versions of words to save on keystrokes. On tiny keypads or phone buttons this obviously can be a time ...
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Is it “a SSD” or “an SSD”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicates: an SQA or a SQA? Do you use “a” or “an” before acronyms? Since SSD (solid-state drive) is pronounced es-es-dee, I'm wondering whether one ...
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3answers
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A generic word to define the superset of companies, NGOs and faculties

I need a word to define a set which includes companies, NGOs and faculties that sounds equally distant to those 3. I am not a native English speaker so I might be wrong but "Corporation" sounds like ...
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2answers
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How To Pronounce “IFRS”?

How to pronounce "IFRS," International Financial Reporting Standards? Anybody knows its phonetic symbols with IPA symbols?
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What do you call words that are separated by a hyphen?

What do you call words like one-note that are separated by a hyphen?
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Is there a term similar to “hypochondriac” except more externally based?

By "external" I mean a person who has a fear or worry of things that could cause serious illness, rather than the fear of already having a serious illness itself. For example, say you worry about ...
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3answers
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Is there a term for French words adopted by the English language, such as “hors d'oeuvres” or “objet d'art”

I would call them "Frenchisms" or some such -ism, but I figured I'd at least ask first. So is there a name for such adopted foreign phrases? Also, how about those adopted from languages other than ...
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If prepend is not part of English, why is there no postpend or subpend? And who introduces them? [closed]

I wanted to ask it already for some time but was in doubt until I've read the comment by Stan Rogers to this answer: In the case of prepend, we have created an artificial term that is ...
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8answers
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Origin of “let's take it offline”

When did people start using the corporate jargon "let's take it offline" (let's discuss that after this meeting in private)? According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the origin of online is from ...
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1answer
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What does “ghetto login route” mean?

Marc Gravell recently provided this answer to a question on Meta Stack Overflow: If you try Jeff's link above, and everything reports OK but it still doesn't work, please let me know. In the ...
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3answers
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Is there a specific name for a portmanteau of two alternative spellings?

This question came about in a discussion between myself and another user of the Gaming.SE chat after I linked in this chiptune track called An Eskimeau Experience Here is the gist of the discussion: ...
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What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing?

What would be a a linguistic term for those nouns ending with -ing? Examples: building, scaffolding, ending. What are some other examples, and what do they all share in common semantically?
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Why is a transportation by road called a “Shipment” but a transportation by seaways called “Cargo”?

I was just reading an article concerning a product trade and transports between countries and came through these words that made me wonder about their differences.
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7answers
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Is technical copywriting jargon or style?

I became confused by comments to my answer insisting that Technical writing is jargon using incorrect English words. I also looked through definitions of "prepend" in internet, all with inserted ...
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How to name something that has sub-categories

So I have this database of my categories. And every category can have sub-categories, except for the prime-level ones. In my database I designate a row that is pointing to the category which will ...