Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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2answers
279 views

Is there a more-accepted synonym to the term “Commonwealth English”?

I've mainly encountered the term "Commonwealth English" in The Jargon File. However, Wiktionary says the term is fairly rare. Are there more accepted terms? Ones that I'm aware of include: British ...
5
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4answers
1k views

What do you call a pair of words which would be meaningless without one of them?

I am referring to a set of words that wouldn't make sense if one word or the other was omitted. Like barbershop quartet, or Cyber Security. What do you exactly call this set of words?
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1answer
457 views

How to derive a noun or adective or adverb from “nya”? [closed]

In Russian network jargon there is adjective "няшный" (originating from anime fandom's "nya"). It is somewhat related to "kawaii" (cute) or "nice", but not the same. However in English any attempts ...
5
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3answers
703 views

generic term for “A-hed”? (quirky article at the bottom of the front page of the Wall Street Journal) [closed]

The Wall Street Journal usually has a quirky article on the bottom of the front page, on anything from paper clips to tugboat racing to borscht manufacturers. Their name for it is an A-hed. Is there a ...
16
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4answers
10k views

“Let's burn that bridge when we come to it” – is this sort of idiom mixing considered a pun, and if so, does it have a specific name?

I couldn't come up with a short title, but the upside is that there is not much needed to be said in the body of the question! For @dmr (and others), it mixes “let's cross that bridge when we come ...
8
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2answers
2k views

Why is the current unrest in the Arab world called the “Arab Spring”?

Does spring in "Arab Spring" refer to the season - or something else?
2
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2answers
705 views

What's the grammatical term for this phenomenon? [closed]

There is obviously a big essential difference between "no towel" and "there isn't a towel". I mean, the former cannot probably serve as a complete sentence, while the latter can. The former can ...
8
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2answers
2k views

Etymology of “binky” — three questions

Definition 2 of binky at wiktionary is "(rabbit behavior) A high hop that a rabbit may perform when happy." This definition is consistent with that at rabbitspeak, and not inconsistent with "A kind ...
1
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1answer
129 views

What is the term for an item/entry in a compendium?

A compendium is a concise, yet comprehensive compilation of a body of knowledge. Source: Wikipedia What then would I call an entry or item of knowledge that is contained by a compendium? Is there a ...
15
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3answers
2k views

Is there a technical term for insideout-ness?

So the technical term for right or left handedness is chirality. The technical term for evenness or oddness is parity. Is there a similar term for inside-out-ness vs right-side-out-ness? EDIT: I ...
0
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2answers
150 views

What is one “content” item in a Wikipedia called?

I think that my question can best be explained by an example: In the following Wikipedia entry (I hope "entry" is the right term), http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_Herring, there are multiple "...
3
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5answers
315 views

What's the term to describe this kind of sentence?

What is the term to describe this kind of sentence: I don't know why people like to study things that they don't like to study. There's some kind of logic error with this statement, and it's ...
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3answers
3k views

“Bring 6 eggs. If there are potatoes, bring 9.”

This is with reference to this comic, called A Programmer's Life (translated from Portuguese): Programmer: My wife asked me to go to the market and said: “Bring six eggs. If there are potatoes, ...
6
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4answers
3k views

What's the origin of “beta” to describe a “user-testing” phase of computer development?

It occurred to me that I use the term "beta" to describe a "release candidate" of a computer product that has passed all expectations of the development team, and is now being given limited exposure ...
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4answers
4k views

What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?

Is sunlight a concrete or abstract noun? What differentiates an abstract noun with a concrete noun?
6
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1answer
25k views

“Production” vs. “manufacturing”

What are the connotations of production and manufacturing? In what situation would you prefer one over the other?
4
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4answers
2k views

“Injunct” vs “Enjoin”

The injunctions (and super-injunctions) that occasionally make the headlines restrain a defendant from doing something. It is fairly clear (e.g. OED) that the word was formed as a noun from enjoin in ...
1
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4answers
104 views

Error on wiki page - Is it ok?

Taken from Wikipedia on Windows and Linux However such an approach has indeed produced several vulnerabilities, although this is a rare case Is that statement logically correct because it ...
5
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5answers
512 views

Word to describe a mathematical variable that repeats, like an angle or time

In mathematics a variable can be said to be constrained if it must lie within certain bounds, for example: 0 < x < 1 (the variable x is constrained: it lies between zero and one) However ...
8
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5answers
11k views

What do we call an adjective made of a verb?

What do we call adjectives formed from verbs? For example: Lost is an adjective made from lose, Forgotten is an adjective made from forget, Broken is an adjective made from break. What is the ...
5
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2answers
12k views

Term for "married bridesmaid”

It was my understanding that, in traditional Western weddings, if the bride were to become unavailable on the day of her wedding then the groom was expected to wed the maid of honor or the next ...
6
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2answers
9k views

Why do people use “mayday” and not “help”? [closed]

I’m not native English speaker, so I wonder why forces like policemen and firemen and such use Mayday instead of the simpler Help. What is origin of this habit?
6
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2answers
1k views

What's the rule for writing sentences with parallel clauses?

I've sometimes seen very nicely written sentences that have 2 clauses: the first is a full sentence, while the second, which is supposed to have a similar structure, was shorten into a special ...
54
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9answers
3k views

Is the term 'String' too jargony to use in a user interface?

Having worked as a software developer for a long time, I'm out of touch sometimes with whether a word would be considered jargon. I am adding something to a user interface where a name is given, and ...
2
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6answers
1k views

What is the technical name for quotes?

This should be an easy question to answer. In my program, I am building a structure which will hold the symbol which identifies a string literal. I want to give the element a meaningful name that ...
1
vote
2answers
305 views

Is there a word or term other than ‘exemplar’ for the educational cards used to teach English?

Is there a word or term other than ‘exemplar’ for the educational cards used in primary classrooms to teach English? These are the: 'A' is for 'Apple' Or for the cards which show how to write a ...
12
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5answers
3k views

What do you call a slip of the tongue in writing?

Is there any phrase or word that can be used to describe a slip of the tongue that happens in writing? Calling it a slip of tongue directly feels awkward, especially when the written text is never ...
7
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3answers
2k views

“Normalization” vs. “canonicalization”

It seems both normalization and canonicalization are used to describe the effort to transform from an arbitrary form to a unique form. Is there any difference between the two words? Why is there XML ...
14
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4answers
17k views

Why is the right jack in cribbage also called “his Knobs”?

Before we got married, my husband taught me cribbage as his way of showing me how important our relationship was to him. One of the points in cribbage is for having "the right jack," or the jack ...
8
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3answers
2k views

What's the origin of the word “sprite”?

EDIT: I appreciate all the answers and the effort provided here, but my question is not about the meaning about the word in English, but about the genesis of the word in computer graphics—I linked ...
7
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4answers
1k views

Linguistics term for word choice

I was taught a word once by a linguist. I can't remember it, but it would be very useful for a Google search I am trying to do to solve another question on a different StackExchange. It was a similar ...
0
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2answers
192 views

What do you call it when A cannot alter B above A?

There's only one true example I can give without going off the idea and this example is quite "techy", so I'm sorry for those who possibly won't understand the principle. I'm certainly not being ...
7
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3answers
31k views

What does “rising senior” mean and what countries use it?

I know it is something to do with universities, but as I have never come across the term before today (and have lived in England all my life including going to an English university), I am assuming it ...
2
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2answers
592 views

Where does the term “make sure” come from?

I was reading the Mac OS X Lion upgrade page, and it said "make sure" all over the place. It struck me as odd. Where does the term "make sure" come from? What are you making to be sure? Yourself? ...
0
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4answers
223 views

What's a generic noun for referring to the bulk material of pure chemical elements?

What's a generic noun (single word or multi-word term) for referring to the bulk material of pure chemical elements? I am talking about H2, O2, lead, diamond, graphene, etc, but not chemical elements,...
12
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3answers
2k views

Term for minimum or maximum

I need to ask a user to request either a minimum or maximum value. What would be the appropriate label for this? I have considered extremum but I am not sure if this is commonly understood or ...
3
votes
4answers
238 views

“Listen to them not”

One of my favorite movies is Hocus Pocus with Bette Midler. One of the lines in the movie is "Listen to them not!" Said by one of the townsfolk in the beginning when they were being hanged. Is this ...
4
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4answers
1k views

Term for people not in any way involved in a crime/incident

I'm looking for a word that refers to the people (general population) who were not involved in an incident. To be particular let's say the incident is a "crime". That is, one you take away the ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Is there a term for the part of a sentence that is in the form “Customers who …” or “Products that …”?

For the purpose of building a dynamic user interface within an software application I wish to separate parts of a set of phrases which would be in the form of the examples below. Examples: ...
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3answers
2k views

What do you call a number that is a power of 2?

I know there is a term for a number that is the power of 2, such as 8, 32, 128, 4096 -- but it slipped my mind.
15
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3answers
2k views

Is there a term for words that when reversed, form other words?

I'm aware of what a palindrome is. What do you call words that, when reversed, form other words, such as ton (not) and part (trap)?
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3answers
2k views

What's the opposite of nominal in the astronaut sense?

If some sub-system is not nominal, what do they say?
6
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2answers
633 views

What do you call a verb which accepts 2 nouns?

In English, there are intransitive verbs which can't used with a noun, or aren't being used with a noun (eg. listen, die, ...), and transitive verbs which can be (eg. almost all of them). However, ...
18
votes
7answers
23k views

Is there a difference between “innocent” and “not guilty”?

I have always thought the antonym of "guilty" is "innocent", but apparently it's just "not guilty". Even juries seem to agree. But why? Aren't they antonyms? Or is there a subtlety I'm missing here?
12
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6answers
204k views

Why use BCE/CE instead of BC/AD?

When I was a kid, I was always taught to refer to years using BC (Before Christ) and AD (Anno Domini / year of our Lord). However, I somewhat regularly hear people referring to years as in the CE (...
17
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4answers
1k views

What is the term for an integer one larger than a given integer?

I'm looking for a concise term to say a number must be exactly one higher than a previous number. None of "subsequent", "incremental", or "next" seem to convey the restriction that it must be ...
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3answers
1k views

Heraldry symbols description

I'm reading Game of Thrones, in English, and when some Heraldry shields are shown as the novel goes, I have some doubts about the meaning on some words. Or given the context some words don't mean what ...
13
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3answers
3k views

How did the word “lid” come to mean “poor operator” (in the context of telegraphy and amateur radio)?

This sense of lid is still common today in Amateur ("Ham") Radio (in the United States, at least), usually as "they're a lid", meaning "they're being a rude or unobservant person." It doesn't refer to ...
2
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3answers
185 views

Can 'area' be called 'plot'?

Can area from mathematics be called plot?
30
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3answers
4k views

What is the origin of “daemon” with regards to computing?

Daemon has an interesting usage in computing. From my local dictionary: a background process that handles requests for services such as print spooling and file transfers, and is dormant when not ...